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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: October 06, 1975 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - October 6, 1975, Yuma, Arizona                             SUN SUN 278th Issue, 72nd Year 15 Cents and ARIZONA SENTINEL 16 Yuma, Arizona, Mon., Oct. 6, 1 975 Telephone 783-3333 SENTINEL 177th Issue, 103rd Year U.S. JEEPS Egypt Displays New Western Weapons 9 Have Filed In City Election Nine candidates have filed and been certified as of this morning to run in the Yuma City Council election. Nine others have indicated they will run and have taken out petitions. According to Marge Oliver, city recorder, the candidates approved to run. are Bob Tip- pett, Modine Uribe, John Shaffer, Cy Bombard, John Underbill, Alfred T. Morgan, Richard.F. Ortega, Doris Rider and'Mary Tellbuescher. Candidates have until 5 p.m. Tuesday to file their petitions of nomination for certification. The primary election is Oct. '28, with voter registration closing Oct. 17. Yuman Is Held For Grand Theft Walter (Junior) Hardlcy, 50, of 488 Maiden Lane, was ar- rainged Sunday before Yuma Justice of the Peace William R. (Bill) Steen on charges of grand theft. Hardley is suspected of tak- ing money and a blue suitcase from Chester William Connal, 45, whose body was found Sat- urday morning in a planter box behind Red's Birdcage, 231 S. Main St. Judge Steen set bund at As of this morning, .Hardley hadn't posted bond and was being held in Yuma County Jail. Yuma police reported this morning Coimal's body was found by Harold E. Wolfram, 585 2nd Ave., and not Hardley as originally reported. Howev- er, police said Hardley had been seen with Connal Friday evening. Connal cashed a check from the Veterans Adminis- tration Fridav afternoon, po- lice said. Then, Connal paid off two small debts and said lie was heading for Phoenix. Connal didn't leave town. However, police said Connal's suitcase was found at Hard- ley's home. This morning, police were still awaiting the results of a palhologist's examination that was conducted to determine the cause of Connal's death. Police said the death could be accidental, due to natural causes or a homicide. Meanwhile, Yuma County sheriff's deputies are still try- ing to identify the body of a man found Saturday morning near the Well ton-Mohawk Main Canal north ofliigurta. Deputies obtained finger- prints from the man, classified them and sent the classifica- tions to the FBI and other law enforcement agencies. Cause of death of the uni- dentified man also hasn't been said. Sinai Accord Bar to Peace DEATH BLAST Tempe police officers examine the remains of a car ripped apart by a violent explosion today when the driver, iden- tified as Joseph Nardi of Tempe, started the engine. TO HIGHER LEVEL Police say an explosive device was planted inside the car, believed to have been a white Lincoln Continental. The car was totally demolished. (AP Wirephoto) Car Bomb 20 People Apparently Decide Kills Man To Transcend Earthly Life Campaign Spending Limit under Review WASHINGTON {AP) The Supreme Court today agreed to review the con- stitutionality of campaign law changes which impose spending limits and other restrictions on presidential candidates. The court will consider a decision of the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington upholding the 1974 amend- ments to the Federal Election Campaign Act. The justices also denied a motion by Senate Republican Leader Hugh Scott of Penn- sylvania nnd Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass., to present oral arguments in support of the amendments through their attorney, Archibald Cox. In addition to limiting spending by candidates, parties and contributors, the legislation requires disclosure of the identity of contributors and provides for partial public financing of presidential campaigns. It has been challenged by former Sen. Eugene Mc- Carthy, DMinn., an in- dependent candidate for president: Sen. James L. Buckley, Con-R-N.Y.. and others. In a brief filed with the high court, they took issue with allegations by the act's supporters about "skyrocketing" costs of political campaigns. The court reached its decision whether to hear the appeal, which was filed Sept. 19, with unusual swiftness. A hearing and decision before the end of the year are con- sidered likely, in view of the importance of the case to the forthcoming elections. WALDPORT, Ore. (AP) Authorities are investigating reports that about 20 people left the Waldport area after being told at a meeting that they would be taught to transcend earthly life. Marjorie Hayes at the Bay Haven Inn said a man who identified himself as Mr. Simons paid S50 to rent the firm's Kir Room for a meeting Sept. 14. Flyers advertising the free meeting said Ihe people who would conduct the meeting were "sent from the level above that of human and will return to that level in a space ship within' the next few months." About 200 people attended, Mrs. Hayes said. She described them as mostly "hippie types." The Oregonian in Portland published the report of a man who attended the meeting but who asked to remain unidentified. He said a man and a woman, dressed alike, conducted the meeting. The man did most of the talking. They said they were sent to earth to provide people who followed them the op- portunity to learn to over- come death and to ascend to the higher level of con- sciousness. They said they would leave soon and others like them would follow, but perhaps not for years. They said people who would fol low them had to give up worldly ties. They suggested that further preparations would be conducted at n site in Colorado. They held a later meeting in Eugene for the people who were not in- terested in following them. There are various reports of people giving away a fishing boat, 150 acres, 10 acres, farm equipment, a guitar and of people putting their children with friends or relatives before leaving. Authorities said most of those who left told relatives they were leaving, and none of thein was listed officially as a missing person. Authorities said there was no evidence any crime had been committed. They said recipients of property that was given away were not involved with the people who conducted the meeting. A woman got a card with a Fruita, Colo., postmark from a son who had left. It said he would not return. TEMPE (AP) An "explosive device" planted inside an automobile blew up today, killing the man who had just got into the car in a parking lot, police said. Officers identified the victim as Joseph Nardi, about 50, of Tempe. They said a large amount of dynamite had apparently been used to trigger the explosion, which occurred about a.m. in the parking lot of the Canlen House Apartments. The victim was killed as he tried to drive off in the vehicle, believed to be a white Lincoln Continental, investigators said. The ex- plosion demolished the car. Nardi apparently lived in the apartment house located at 3730 S. Mill Road. Tempe police say the man killed in an explosion today was a witness for the FBI in a 1970 case nnd was living under a different name. Million Hospital Bond Vote Okayed by Supervisors Today Human Chain Being Planned ROSEMONT, 111. (AP) More than 40 persons from around the country are beginning plans for a bicentennial "hands across America" celebration. A meeting Sunday in this Chicago suburb brought agreement on a tentative coast-to-5 4oute, with persons holding hands in a chain stretching across the United States on the nation's 200th birthday. Attending were representatives of some national civic organizations as well as individuals and an observer from the American Revolutionary Bicentennial Administration Chicago attorney Marvin Rosenblum, who conceived the plan earlier this year, said, "You can't photograph linked spirits...so you have to go for the next best thing- linked hands." The tentative which Rosenblum emphasized is subject to changes, would start in Boston. From there it would run through Now York and Philadelphia to Washington, angle northwest to Pittsburgh, Cleveland, and Chicago, and veer south- west through St. Louis, Tulsa, Okla., Oklahoma City and Dallas. Continuing west through Amarillo, Tex., the human chain would wind through Albuquerque, N.M., Phoenix and Los Angeles. Japan Royality Tours U.N. NEW YORK or Hirohito and Empress Na- gako of Japan toured the Unit- ed Nations headquarters today amid some of the toughest se- curity measures ever seen in this city. As they arrived in a 24-car motorcade, police sharp- shooters could be seen on neighboring roofs holding rifles. Police launches patroled the East River. The streets from the Waldorf-Astoria, where the imperial couple is staying, were heavily guarded. There were at least 100 police outside the hotel where King Olav V of Norway is also n guest. By ERNIE RUSH The Yuma Daily Sun The Yuma County Board of Supervisors this morning ap- proved I he setting of n date for a bond election for remodeling and expansion at Yuma Regional Medical Center. The request was in the form of a letter from Hospital Dis- trict 1 Board chairman Dale Webb which states, "The Hos- pital Operating Board has in- formed us (the Dist. 1 board) they can pay this indebtedness without undue rate'increases barring unforeseen events." The letter requests an elec- tion be held as soon as ble, but the Board of Super- visors did not set a date at this morning's meeting. Originally the hospital board requested a million Ixind issue after being inform- ed by the bonding firm, Hefsnes, Ely, Beck and Co., of Phoenix, that this was the ma- ximum increase in indebted- ness the hospital could gener- ate revenue to cover. The firm later informed the board that closer study show- ed the hospital could carry an additional indebted- ness, according to Webb. As a result, the district board decided to add that amount to the bond issue be ing requested. The entire amount of the bond issue must lie paid out of hospital revenue, despite its being a general obligation bond, according to a state law related to hospital bonding. If the present hospital oper- ators default on tile bond pay- ment for one year, their con- tract, is automatically can- celed, and the default mnde up by county taxes. Then the operation of the hospital must be put out. to bid. The issue, if approved by hospital district voters, will be For map of Precinct 1 in A WC District Governing Board election seepage G. lyXvXvXxXx.xCx'X.X'X'X'XWX'X' used in several phases of the expansion. The biggest priority is remo- deling of the present building, particularly the obstetrics and units, at a cost of about million. Adding space in the pediat- rics unit will cost approxi- mately and equipping all the new, facilities about The bond issue will not gen- erate enough money to com- plete the proposed expanison and remodeling. But the hospi- tal hopes to raise the addition- al money needed by a concert- ed community fund drive, ac- cording to George Williams, hospital director. 'Other phases of expansion ipcludc completion of the top floor to give additional bed space at a cost of approxi- nuitley million, and a third elevator in the new building at a cost of In another action, the Board of Supervisors authorized the Yuma County Housing Au- thority to study the creation of a joint city-county authori- ty with a single staff. According to Charlene Ma- loney, director for the authori- ty, the joint committee pro- posal was prompted by the closing of Mesa Vista Homes, a county apartment complex operated by the housing au- thority. She said the county is sub- mitting an application to the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for a leasing subsidy program for low income persons. In order to best take advan- tage of the program, she rec- ommended the county consid- er the joint authority. The county would retain ju- risdiction on the committee outside of the city limits, and the city would retain jurisdic- tion inside. The single staff would allow those making application for the program to easily locate inside or outside the city, she said. "People don't know bounda- ry lines when they're looking for she said. Paffy Reports Denied SAN FRANCISCO (AP) Attorneys for both sides in the Patricia Hearst case denied published reports today that the newspaper heiress has con- fessed to several crimes in- cluding a fatal bank robbery and has agreed to turn state's evidence. A story in today's editions of the New York Post quoted "sources familiar with the in- terviews" as saying Mias Hearst had confessed during talks with court-appointed psychiatrists seeking to deter- mine whether she is mentally competent. The Post said Miss Koarst identified several persons who harbored her as a fugitive and agreed to testify aganst her terrorist comrades in return for immunity or special treat- ment. The report said Miss Hearst, 21, decided to cooperatd with authorities after her attorney, F. Bailey, told her it was the only way to avoid a long prison term. "This is absolutely not said Albert Johnson, a partner of Bailey's, when in- formed of the Post story. "I've been the only attorney with her for the past week, and she has not confessed to anything. By ASSOCIA TED PRESS Egypt displayed Western military equipment, including American jeeps, it has acquired in the past year along with its standard Soviet armaments in a parade today marking the second anniversary of the 1973 war with Israel. A dozen French-built Mirage 111 jet fighter-bombers and six British-made Commando heli- copters swept over the review- ing stand during the hour and a half march. The aircraft and the jeeps, some mounted with previously unseen antiaircraft missiles that sources described as Sovi-. et SAM7s, were purchased by Saudi Arabia and other Per- sian Gulf states in an effort to lessen Egypt's dependence on the Soviet Union for arms. President Anwar Sadat, who took the salute, is expected to seek additional American mili- tary equipment when he makes a state visit to the United States starting Oct.27. On Sunday, three Mobil Oil Co. representatives, accom- panied by six United Nations escorts, arrived at a northern Sinai uil field in what will be- come the expanded buffer zone between Israeli and Egyptian forces under the new Sinai ac- cord. Prime Minister Yitzak Rabin in Jerusalem reaffirmed Israel's intention to delay sign- ing the new Mideast peace ac- cords until the U.S. Congress approves the presence of American technicians in the But Congress is expected to approve this week the sta- tioning of the technicians. The Israelis said the Ameri- can oilmen would inspect the area and check plans for a turnover to Egyptian control of the Ras Sudr wells, about 7f) miles north of the main Abu Rude is fields. A former undersecretary of state and a senator said today the new Sinai accord is more likely to impede than assist progress toward a final peace agreement, in the Middle East. George W. Ball, undersecre- tary of state in.the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, told the Senate Foreign Rela- tions Committee it had little choice but to recommend ap- proval of the accord because of- AWC Election Is Tuesday Eligible voters are being urged to cast their ballots in Tuesday's Precinct 1 election of the Arizona Western Col- lege District Governing Board. Charles McConnell will be the only candidate listed on the ballot. He is the only one to formally file for the seat held by Donald N. Solriwedel, who will retire Dec. 31 after serving on tbe board since its inception, Soldwedel urged those eligi- ble to vote in the precinct to turn out for the election. "This election is just as important as any contested he said. "We have set up six poll- ing places so as to make it easy for residents of Precinct 1 to vote." The retiring board member emphasized, "Your casting of a vote will show your hacking of the new board member and your interest in gaining a bet- ter image for your community college." Polls will open at 6a.m. to- morrow and will remain open until 7p.m. Polling places are Yuma Datsun, Bishop Gardens recre- ation room, Alice Byrne School, Gila Vista School, O.C. Johnson School and Wood- ward Junior High School. McConnell, deputy execu- tivedirector of Yuma Regional Medical Center, has been en- dorsed by the Yuma County Educators Political Action Committee YCE-PAC President Ray Orysdnle also encouraged a strong voter turnout. "We strongly urge eligible voters to show support for community college education and Charles McConnell by casting their vote he stated. the heavy investment of U.S. prestige in Middle East negoti- ations. But Ball said the Sinai pack- age of agreements is "likely to impede, rather than assist, pro- gress toward a final solution" of the Arab-Israeli dispute in the Middle East. Ball testified before the opening session of public hear- ings by the committee shortly afterSen. James Abourezk told members the new Sinai accord represents only a partial settle- ment in the Middle East and would assure "more conflict, not less." By approving the accord, said Abourezk. a South Dakota Democrat. Congress would help the United States lose le- verage to bring about an overall Middle East set- tlement. Ball told the committee the effect of the Sinai package is to neutralize the moderate voice of Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and remove his influence from attempts to reach a final settlement on such issues >as occupation of the Golan Heights by Israel, the Palestinians and the future of Jerusalem. These issues concern all of the Arab slates, Ball said, and cannot be settled by bilateral negotiations. Inside The Sun Comics..........................10 Crossword......................8 Editorial.........................4 Markets..............'............2 Movies...........................10 Parker News................11 Sports.............................9 Weather.........................3 Women............................7 The Weather Tompumturv nt 11 n.ni. today 87 Hifihiodny near 100 LowTuesday muring mid 60s Tuwxlny mid !IOs Kehitivphimidityiitllajii.tiitUy HI'r Average high thisdalu 94 Average low lliisdntt- fifi Forecast for Yuma nnd vicinity: In- m-iisinp clnuriimss Tuesday. Windy, slightly cooler daw. winds 1ll.15ni.pJi. thWtvniooii. 10-20 m.pJi. Sunset Sunrise CHARLES MCCONNELL Qualified voters should have received letters notifying them of the election during the past week, according to college of- ficials. Anyone having ques- tions about eligibility should call 726-1000, Ext. 250, during the day Tuesday. Those voting will be requir- ed to sign affidavits swearing they are qualified voters. In order to vote, a person is re- quired to be a qualified elector in state elections and have been a resident of the college district 30 days immediately preceding the election. An unofficial tally will be made tomorrow evening in the Iward room of the AWC ad- ministration building. The of- ficial canvass of the ballots will take plnce at a special dis- trict board meeting Monday, Oct. 13, in the senate room-of the College Union.   

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