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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: September 7, 1972 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - September 7, 1972, Yuma, Arizona                             Supervisor Candidates Answer Sun's Questions -I-.VICK 001'T I'HOlO UIV CO o-O DAVID HIL.L. OLD iV.p-N.'.-F i OH SUN ond ARIZONA x H SENTINEt SUN 254th Issue, 67th Year Yuma, Arizona, Thurs., Sept. 7, 1972 SENTINEL 149th Issue, 100th Year Eight Americans Slain At Virgin Islands Resort GLEN STROHM Incumbent Supervisor WILBUKN McCURLEY The Challenger DDescribe your qualifications for the office you seek. I have Ix'i'ii self-employed for twenty-six wars. I have served on city and county government fur vents. I ;im currently completing my fourteenth year on your County Hoard of Supervisors. I have vi- gorously studied methods of holding the line against increased county taxation, and have studied and implemented various state and federal programs created to as- sist county government through fund- sharing and grants and inter-governmental cooperation. This backgunnd qualifies me lor this posit ion. Political science major in college. Fifteen vears of administrative, budgeting and purchasing experience in both military and civil life. Marine engineering graduate. AMALIK, St. Thomas. V.I. (AP) Police hunted today for four or five gunmen wearing green fatigues .who machine-gunned eight Americans to death during a robbery in the golf clubhouse of a Rockefeller resort in the Virgin Islands. Officials would not release the names of four of the vie- No Tax Hike: Nixon 2) Some areas of Yuma County are growing rapidly, yet the county has no zoning regulations. Do you see any need for controlling and guiding this by means of zoning? Xonini; for the City and County should he an overlapping program which should lie adapted to Ihe most advantageous uses needed by the Lily anil County. I under- stand the need for in the areas where the City of Yuma is expanding; however, such must he done without being overly burdensome to agrictlh lire. A definite and major need for Yuma Countv. particularly in areas where poten- tial danger from inadequate sewage dispo- al creates sanitation problems. Protection of agriculturalists is needed against busi- ness exploitation. Fringe areas of efforts should he jointly undertaken. 3) Stale law now allows the smaller counties to vote on the question of having a five-man Board of Supervisors (instead of three members as at Would this be advantageous for Yuma County? An increased number of would only add to a cost to the county taxpayer which, at this lime, is not ins- tilled due to the. amount of population we have, li is my considered opinion that when our population nears the HXI.IIOO mark then serious consideration should be given lo increasing I he Hoard to live members. Do you believe the present method the best interests of the county? The present method of hiring county ollicialsis I he method used in most respon- sible businesses. That is, we, the Hoard of attempt lo hire the most able and qualified men lor all the various county posit ions to be filled. I feel thai this creates an atmosphere of responsibility and thus makes county employees direct ly responsible to the taxpayers. We have always tried toclfccl (he hiring of Ihe lies! man for the job. Accusations of two-man board control has been made often under differing adminis- trations. A five man board would eliminate anv such coalition in county government. At present, representation in the countv is not equal. Distances involved prevent certain supervisors from adequately repre- senting their constituents. With recem re- disincline. Hist. Three has insufficient votes to elect a representative from the Ynma area. of hiring county employees serves Hiring bv hoard action onlv has resulted in numerous retired military officers being hired bv the countv. While possibly Iwst qualified, the lack of an evaluation hoard eliminates ot her qualified persons from po- tential employment. 1 would desire that positions be advertised and the best man selected bv a board of evaluation rather than simple hoard vote. I would desire an effort be made for employment of quali- fied memlx'rs of ininorit v groups. 5) In your opinion what are the three most .serious problems now confront- ing the Yuma County Board of Supervisors? B ecause ot growth, both here in the County. Ivcausc of the v.-.l to maintain good county government, roads, parts and other county facilities, because of the ever increasing inflation and eost-of-living bur- dens upon you 1 believe that preventing an increase in county lax rate is the most significant priority facing am Hoard of Supervisors. (Yrlainly the large narcotic traffic in our area is one of our problems because of Yuma's proximity to the Mexican border. Another problem is the growing necessity for better countv parks and recreational facilities for our own use and encouraging tourism. (li. Potential loss of lax revenue in both Ihe city and county when the Interstate N bypass is complete. Loss of tax revenue from reduced business could force tax in- crease. Feel a study should be made at this time to offset such potential tax loss and forestall increased taxes. Study of fringe areas to provide needed to reduce cost to taxpayers in event of future annexation. Need of a merit system to assure con- tinuation in county employment thus as- suring the best man in the best job with continuity from administration to admin- istration. 6) If goals would you have for the County of Yuma during the four-vear term? This quest ion must be answered within the context ol the previous question. To provide better parks and rurea- tional facilities within sound tvonomic limilal ions, I will continue to s.rk and obi am federal funds lor the projects MI thai tbev can be effected without addi- tional burden upon Yuma County taxpay- ers. In this vein I will assist local law en- loi i-eiiicnt in their cltort- to oht am tub-nil lund-to-oh c their problems, and will figbi fur and federal prot'u -sharing legisla- tion in !cs-i-n the burden uixui yon. in all -phiTt- ot i-iiiini y To work for a five man board of super visors. To work for decrease of county tax load. To study problem of enticing pollu- tion-free industry. To investigate the feasi- bility of a countv merit svMem. To work for county zoning and to In- a full time -upcm-nr reflecting the desire- and needs "f the taxpayers of l he countv. Tomorrow Last Day To Sign For Classes Friday is the last opportu- nity students have to register at Arizona Western College and receive official college credit lor classes this fall se- mester. Tonight, however, is the last night for evening registration. Registration will run from p.m. in the registrar's office in the administration building on campus. No additional charges will be made for late registration since these fees have been waived, said Donald K. Brad- sbaw, college registrar. Stu- dents may also register Friday during the day from H a.m. p.m. Students may register for full time or part-time loads. Late registrants, however, will have to makeup work that bei-n assigned since i he start of classes. AugL'Sth. Inside The Sun Comies Crossword Editorial Food Markets Movies Sports Women 19 13, II. 15 5. fi 1 YOU NOW HAVE THE WEATHER Anti-Fraud Toughened Tfnir Hichl IW.c AV.T ttu- ni .Tr.lun- thi-.iM, nicht li'lli- 1'HOKNIX l An inten- -ified drive to prosecute con- Dinner frauds will begin Oct. the state attorney general's of- fu csaid Wwlnesdav. Jack MiCnrmick. assNtant attorney general, said th" aid I.-H f-t'i law i-nforc.-menl agencies "t has h.-i-n enlisted in the tough- ened procram. nh'1' McCormick "aid the program wa- made po.-iblc from an amendment to thi- Slat.- sumer Fraud Act which will tx-rmit countv attorneys to bring charges and prosecute consumer fraud eases in their countH-s. In the past onlv the attorncv offif.- hafl authority He said local police and -heriffs' departments may in- vestigate consumer fraud cases and refer them to their countv attorn.-v or ihc attorney gen .-ral for pro-i-i ulion to register for H voting in the g 1972 General S Elections this November! g Register at Office of County Recorder 5j g Yuma County Court House tims, but Lt. C.ov. David Maas said they were believed to be tourists from the U.S. main- land. A spokesman for the Rocke- feller family in New York said two of (he victims were tenta- tively identified as Pat Tar- bert. a girl who worked in the club's golf shop, and John Gul- liver, a groundskeepcr. He said the other two victims were electricians. The gunmen opened fire late Wednesday afternoon in Ihe Fountain Valley Golf Club on the island of St. Croix. about 50 miles south of St. Thomas, Maas said. Seven persons died at the scene and another at a hospital. Ronald Tonkin, the territo- ry's attorney general, said there were four or five men in green fatigues using automatic weapons. The killers looted their victims' pockets and cleaned out the clubhouse cash drawer before escaping into the overgrown hills around the course. Gov. Melvin II. Kvans was called back to Ihe islands from Hilton Head. S.C., where he had been named vice chairman of the Southern Governor's Conference "This is alNolnti-lv the worst thing thai has ever happened in the Virgin Islands." saifl Maas. who was act ing governor until F.vans' return. "These men will be caught." About police were search- ing for the gunmen. WASHINGTON White House said today Pres- ident Nixon does not plan a request for tax increases should he win a second term, but the possibility for changes in the tax system was left open. Presidential press secretary Ronald L. Ziegler told news- men. "We plan no tax increases and we contemplate no tax in- creases." Asked what time period his assertion covered, Ziegler repli- ed, "In the second term." The press secretary's asser- tion followed an appearance at the White House by House Re- publican Leader Gerald Ford of Michigan and Senate Republi- can Leader Hugh Scott of- Pennsylvania. Their message, following a two-hour meeting with the President and other Republican leaders, was that no tax increases would be asked through the next Con- gress. Xiegler appeared in a Intvi press briefing where he was queried on the tax issue. Asked whether the President might not propose yet a fax program that die] not involve increases. Ziegler said it was "something 1 can't predict." THE PRO SHOP Mayor Allt uses a golf club to show City Ad rrading to an flic plmis and iniiiistralor Jim Clevenger the drawing of the pro shop .specifications (he building at yesterday s ('iiy Council for the city's new golf course. The City Council gave meeting. (Sunf'oto) Koreans To Quit Vietnam New City Finance Dept., Pro Shop Are Approved SKOUL (AP) The South Korean government has decid- ed to withdraw the Korean troops still in Vietnam Hv HICK COOK between next December and The Yuma Daily Sun a high-ranking A pro shop for the cit v's new hoicign official said ,mrw Department were among the w-is items gaining approval at ves- several terdav's Yuma City Council treasurer, acting as finance applications from American director. The Department will Legion I'osi Yuma handle bookkeeping, purr-has- Lions Club and ihc Fraternal ing and financial mailers for Order of Kagl.-s and M.I the cilv which an- now spread li'iib a-, tin- for a hi-aring 'li thi-.ipphialiuii-. of South Wednesday. The (Council gave final read- The South Korean govern alu' approval to an ordi- m.-nt withdrew I.D1X) troops a Cuv Finance An from Vietnam earlier tin., year. Department and gave reading Kecrcalion and Park Commis Korean forces have been in ordinance adopting plans sion received first n-idini; The since I'lift and have specifications for a pr been the second largest foreign golf course, contingent fighting for the Sai- gun government. venger showed the .mined ar- I'-a.-.- ann-cmi-nt with the -lav list'.-, shop for ihe new ,-oursi-. lor nun- months M'fi a mon'li Tin- ,-lnhhoii-i- i-- ,.jlv VI..Jr and us.-d for ri-.-r.-alional pur commission will si-rvi- in an The City Finance Depart menl will be headed by the city R.H. and Asso- Phones Were Already Topped, Soys O'Brien WASHINGTON f.M'i 0'Hin-n -aid conversation- Lawrence F. 0'Hrn-n -aid on hi- office n-l.-phoni- wen- today his lapti.-d nionilori-d by i-avesdroppt-r- in for weeks wb.-n hi- was a room on the seventh floor of Democratic nation: man, and that an a In tempt was made lo hug 'In- prc-i onvi-nl Ion i-ainp.-i.-uii headquarters ol S.-a McGovern O'Brien, now naiimia! b.ur- uian of McGiA'ern'- aiiitiaign as Democratic pn-sid.-niial no- minee, told a news onfi'i.-n. the five rni-n arresti-d -luni- 17 al party hi-atlipiartei m Watergate Office Building wi-ri- in fad Irving :o a t in tin- tap on In.- bin-, and install new mi-lit. Howard Johnson llnti. across i hi- strci-i from the Wa- i.Tgai.-. and tran.-cribi-d in form Hi- diil not di-.-lo-.i- thi- -onrc.- ot ill.- information on hi' h In- hi- bin -aid w.-ii- Hlnmp.-a- ,f.-. lln-d lo Hero's Photo Brings Arrest I'l.KVF.I.AN D.Ohio (Al'i Kiig.-ii" hmidt. ot Gene- va. Ohio, wa- photograph'-d h lo two nn-n in a plan.- ,-ra-h la-l wi-.-ki-nd. Also receiving first readiiiL' was an ordinance providing fur the purchase of a 1-J foot cen- "rm trifigual pumji for tin- Citv's Pn-si-nt lor thi- inci.-titiB Water Department. Cli-venger Mavor Allt; Coiinnlmcn said the pump will n-placi- on.- -latins Pi-nd.-r. Jim D.-vu. Mrs which broke down. Gail Bi-.-l.-r John California's Climate Changing, Says Expert I.A.IOI.I.A.falil 1 -a-.- Sol S. npp- r.-.-an-h a-i-tani -i' M Born, -aid burn- "l-'-d on tin- lii-ni 'hat -Vlart li He said at l.-a-i two n-le- pboni-s were tapp.-d at D.-ino cratic and that of Oiivi-r. liaison man with Di-mocran. chairm.-n O'Brien -aid at; ailemp' wa- 'barging him will mad.- to hug thi- Capitol Hill campaign ln-adquarli-r- of ill" Mcd.m-rn on May J7. but was al a.m ln-'-aiisi- tbi- prc-i-n> of pas-er-ln prevcnii-d thi- ini-n invulvi'd from cnii-rmg th" of- fici's at IPI C St m a-bington. ".a- i'-, John P.-l.ii. managi-i ol Athli-tn I'iub in li-vi-land. wbo -av. I pi, Mir.- in a n.-w- S'bmidt i-i barg.-d w it b taking horn Inh wbili- ib'-r.-a-a barii-nd'-r la-i Angilvt. a -.M-aki-nin-.' ot Hva.-int h v.hirli l h ,'rom Itopnal -loim- a ini Ihc California -tormx in ih.- paM i-plaMiig a .aid the a- tar no.-tb a- Kl KM- wbit.-b.-aidKl-.-u-nliM -ario. M.-x.. -v.-ra! a San a-.VI"   

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