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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: June 7, 1972 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - June 7, 1972, Yuma, Arizona                             OH SUN 177th Issue, 67th Year 10 Cents SUN 24 Pages SENTINEL-72nd I..., Y.O, POSSIBLE LOSS Fire Destroys 3 Yuma Firms By BOBWERLEY The Yuma Daily Sun Fire swept through three Yuma businesses in a shopping complex early this morning with damages estimated at over _ Totnlly destroyed were the Sage and Sand Cocktail Lounge. 2500 4th Avenue; Ray's Auto Supply and Crafts Inc. The three are adjacent to each other with a fourth busi- ness in the 270-foot-long build- ing, Fashion Square, suffering heat, smoke and lire damage. All duty and off-duty fire- men, totalling 33 fire fighters and four chiefs, responded to the fire call shortly after mid- night. Two hours later, the weary fire fighters had stopped the blaze just short of the final business. Cause of the fire wns believ- ed to be an electrical short in the ceiling of the cocktail lounge and not lightning as was reported by a wire service. Shortly after midnight, a cus- tomer entered the bar and told the bartender that there was a fire on the roof. The Yuma Fire Department was called and the bartender locked the money in the safe and dismis- sed his customers. When the fire fighters arriv- ed, the flames were working in the attic space and proved im- possible to control. Despite the use of three pumpers, the lad- der truck and most all of the hose available, the fire moved through the building, aided bv a from the northeast. Chief Hennie Raebel was in charge of the fire fighting, aided bv assistant chiefs Ted Hardy and Bill Steicn. Al- though the blaze was effec- tively halted in two hours, some units were still at the scene at. 6 a.m. Because of the large numljer of units and men at the fire, one unit from MCAS was called on to stand by at station one in case of any need in the downtown area. This morning. Ray SIIVH- geau, owner of the building and operator of the auto sup- ply, estimated that thu loss of the building would run around He guessed his stock might be valued at In reply to a question he said. "I have some insurance." W.E. Wickman, who was in the process of selling the cock- tail lounge, said the loss of stock and fixtures in the bar might run He reported that he was insured and that the cash the bartender de- posited in the safe was reco- vered intact. In halting the lire, the fire lighters succeeded in keeping the blaze out of the Buena Vista Motel that is built al- most touching the Savageau building. Three other busi- nesses in the small shopping complex were not harmed. Thcv are Fabric Inc.. M'Ladv Beautv Salon and Venus de Milo. Thev are in a separate building and the smoke was carried nwnv from them bv the breeze. McGovern Draws Four Aces In Sweep of State Primaries MIDNIGHT BLAZE As the Yuma Fire Department ladder hose pour water into the blaze at left, Ray Savageau (center) watches as his building is lost to fire last night. Destroyed were Sage and Sand Cocktail Lounge, Ray's Auto .Supply and Crafts In. The blaze was fought for two hours before being brought under control. Additional photos Page 3. (Sunfoto) Supreme Court Strengthens FCC Authority over Cable TV WASHINGTON Supreme Court strengthened the Federal Communication Commission's authority to reg- ulate cable television with a ruling today that the FCC has authority to order CATV oper- ators to originate some of their own programming. The court ruled 5-4 to over- turn a decision by the U.S. Cir- "cuit Court in St. Louis that the "FCC had overstepped its au- thority. The challenge to the ruling had been brought by Midwest Video Corp. which operates cable television sys- tems in Missouri, New Mexico and Texas. Such systems capture TV and radio signals and carry them by microwave or coaxial cables into homes, most in communities with poor recep- tion for direct signals. The FCC ordered in that CATV systems with more than subscribers must be able to present programs other than automated services. Chief Justice Warren E. Burger said the FCC should be allowed wide latitude until Congress acts to deal with the problems brought about by the emergence of CATV. Four justices, William J. Brennan Jr., Byron R. White, Thurgood Marshall and Harry A. Blackmun also ruled in favor of the FCC. They said the rule is not only within FCC's legal authority to regulate cable television but "there is substantial evidence that the rule, with its subscriber standard...will pro- mote the public interest within the meaning of the Com- munications Act of 1934." Dissenting from the opinion were Justices William 0. Douglas, Potter Stewart, Lewis F. Powell Jr. and William H. Rehnquist. "The policies reflected in the plurality opinion may be wise the dissenting opinion, written by Douglas, said, "but whether CATV systems should be required to originate pro- grams is a decision that we cer- tainly are not competent to make and in my judgment the commission is not authorized to make. Congress is the agency to make the decision and Congress has not acted." By ASSOCIATED PRKSS Sen. George McGovern cap- tured the crucial California primary today to cap a four- primary sweep that takes him a long way toward winning the Democratic presidential no- mination. Though the race turned out to be closer than expected, the South Dakota senator won a clear victory over Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey in their battle for California's 271 delegates to the Democratic National-Con- vention. Along with victories in New Jersey, New Mexico and his native South Dakota, the triumph vaulted McGovern's delegate total past the 900 mark in his drive to reach the needed to capture his party's presidential nomina- tion.- Humphrey, however, ap- peared to have done well enough in California to stay in the race and encourage those Democratic party leaders and labor chieftains who have been cool to the McGovern candi- dacy. Kven before it became clear that Humphrey's margin in populous Los Angeles County would be insufficient to over- other candidates split the re- maining ballots The vote was McGovern Humphrey and Wallace Despite the uncertainty in Wallace's totals, it appeared that McGovern's gains Tues- day's primaries were enough to move him ahead of Wallace for the first time in total popular votes. In the primaries before that he could do' better than McGovern against President Nixon in November. McGovern told cheering supporters in San Francisco today, "If there was such a thing as a stop-McGovern movement under way across the country, I think we ended here in California on the 6th of June." come the hefty McGovern ma- jont.es m the northern part of thoseheldTuePsdav, McGovern Humphrey V J the state and in San Diego, McGovern was claiming victo- ry and saying it means he'll win the Democratic nomination. With 94 per cent of the vote counted, McGovern had 45 per cent, Humphrey had 39 per cent. Alabama Gov. George C. Wallace, a write-in entry, ran third with five per cent, but his true total was unlikely to be known for several days. Six votes and Wallace 3.41 million. On the basis of today's incom- plete totals, McGovern led by about votes. Humphrey said today in Houston, Tex., where he was meeting with Democratic gov- ernors, "We did much better than people expected. We felt we mounted a good campaign." Humphrey told newsmen he hadn't "the shadow of a doubt" Consider Wallace HOUSTON, Tex. (AP) Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey, battered by a California defeat in his bid for the Democratic presidential nomination, re- versed himself today and said he could under some circum- stances accept Alabama Gov. George C. Wallace as a vice presidential running mate. Melon Firm with UFW Contract Couldn't Get Workers Today Juco Bowl Pact Is Signed Here o School Financing Reviewed Bv DUNCAN OSBORN Tin' Yuma DnilvSun Yuma's proverbial cap has grown a new feather and it's called the Sunkist-El Toro National Football Champion- ship. Tom Gaddis of Snnkist Growers. Inc. out of Sherman Oaks, Calif, announced here todav that the National Jun- ior College Football Cham- pionship game has been moved to Yuma. It will he belli be- tween the first mid sec- ond-ranked junior college football teams in (he nation Nov. 251 h. The Kl Toro Bowl. Inc. today signed a contract with the National Junior College Athletic Association to con- duct the game here. The con- tract is for one vear. with a two-year option. Formerly the Shrine Bowl, the national championship game has lieen held in Savannah, (in. for the past several vears. Today's announcement earnest a press conference at the City Council chamber in (he Yuma City Hall. Present were Gaddis, assistant manag- er of public relations for Stin- kist. Bob Kennedy, chairman of the Kl Torn Howl. Inc., I; Mayor Tom Allt, some local ii buisinessmen and repre- sentatives of local media. Kennerlv said the recipients of any profits the game may show will be the Yuma Grid Kids. Inc. Gaddis stated that Sunkist, a marketing co-op with about 8.000 growers in Arizona and California, has been sponsor- ing major sporting events for some time and have "never had an unsuccessful event." "Our feeling is that the pub- licity value of this thing is in- Gaddis said. "1 think that the people in this community have an excellent opportunity. The communitv has totally something to gain." Kennerlv outlined their re- sponsibilities under t he NJCAA contract. He said transportation to and from the game must be furnished for 40 people per team "bv the reasonable means of transpor- tation." Further, both teams must be housed and fed for a maximum of 48 hours before the game and 24 hours afterward. Both teams must also be supplied with suitable mementoes and trophies from the game. He said the participating schools receive no monev. (Turn to Page 2) WASHINGTON Supreme Court today agreed to rule on the way all states ex- cept Hawaii finance their pub- lic schools. Acting on an appeal by Texas, the. court said it would review next term a ruling by a three-judge federal court in San Antonio that the current property tax system disadvan- tages the poor and is unconsti- tutional. Thirty stales lined up with Texas in seeking review. But four of their governors backed the district court. Eventually, the case may rival in importance the 1954 Brown vs. Board of Education suit that led to the desegrega- tion of schools in Southern and border states. In every state except Hawaii, public-school financing is based to a large degree on the local property tax. Though the states and federal government provide additional funds, the kind of education a child re- ceives is related directly to the tax revenue from property in his district. Weatherman Sees More Rain Here Rain dampened Yuma again yesterday, and the National Weather Service predicts more where that came from. A 30% chance of thunder showers was forecast for this afternoon, tonight and Thurs- day after .03 of an inch last evening was measured at the airport and .13 of an inch at the Valley Experiment Sta- tion on 8th Street. Northeast winds gusted to 29 mph during the thunder- storm. The Wellton area was hit hy high winds, dust and rain ves- tcrdav. Two power poles were reported set afire by lightning, causing a power outage of about 35 minutes in Wellton and one for several hours at McElhanev Cattle Co. No rainfall measure was available from the area. Guslv winds of 15-25 mph are forecast near th'.i'i'ler- showers. The weekend outMok indicates continued cloudiness with widely scattered thunder- showers. High temperatures combin- ed with high humidity t" keep Yuma steamv. Todav's high of 97 and this morning's low of 72 are expected to ho related Thursdav. The sun will set at p.m. todav and rise again imnnrrnw at a.m. The Yuma division of Fresh- pict Foods, Inc., couldn't get any workers for their canta- loupe harvest this morning, even though they have a sign- ed contract with the United Farm Workers. A spokesman for Freshpict said they are forced to tell buyers that they cannot sell cantaloupes today because they have no field crews. He said-there were trucks stand- ing by this morning, waiting to load melons for market. Body Is Identified The man whose body was found floating near the shore of Squaw Lake Monday has been identified as Robert Mi- chael Matusio. 30, of Lakeside. Calif. Identification was made by the Imperial County Coroner's office. Today Malusio's Irndv will sent to the Lakeside Mortu- ary for services and burial in the Lakeside Cemetery. The Johnson Mortuary is in charge of shipping arrangements. "Very he com- mented bitterly. Freshpict Foods signed a contract with UFW early in 1970. Under the contract, the UFW agrees to furnish field crews for the cantaloupe har- vest at specified rates of pay, both for piece-work and hourly rates. But this morning, it was re- ported that workers refused to go into Freshpict fields be- cause they wanted more money than the contract called for. One unconfirmed report said one bus in San Luis was loaded with workers, but that union officials stopped the bus and led the workers off. It was reported that Fresh- pict had asked for 100 field workers this morning to pick cantaloupes using the con- veyor-belt loading machines which make the work easier, on a piece rate basis which is an option of the grower under his contract with UFW. Fresh- pict has melon fields in both Yuma and Gila Valleys and intended to pick in both areas today. But without field workers, they are forced to a halt. This latest development in the Yuma cantaloupe situa- tion strengthens the belief of local growers that a contract with UFW holds no benefits for them, but several disad- vantages. "If the UFW refuses to perform under the terms of its own contracts, what good are one grower asked. 1-8 Opens Smoothly Interstate 8 began exiting onto Kith Street west off Pacific Avenue this morning without ceremony. At the traffic signals at the freeway exit and entrance on Ifith Street were turned onto their red and green se- quence. The freeway dis- charges cars onto Ifith Street, which leads them to 4th Ave- nue, back onto Highway 80. Grenade Believed For Agnew MANSFIELD, Conn. (AP) State police today arrested a man they said was carrying a bund grenade and heading for the U.S. Coast Guard Aca- demy, where Vice President Spiro T. Agnew was to speak. State police in Mansfield .said they acted on a tip and arrested Jerome Jacobson Jr., 26, of Conventry, Conn., a.m., about the time Agnew was scheduled to arrive at the academv in New London. The academy is about 35 miles away from the scene of the ar- rest. The vice presid' '.'s heli- copter arrived 15 minutes be- hind schedule. inside The Sun Comics..........................20 Crossword....................18 Editorial.........................4 Markets..........................2 Movies...........................18 Sports................13, 14, 15 Women............................5 Picking Reported 'About Normal' While handfuls of United Farm Worker pickets are still present around Yuma, local growers say cantaloupe har- vesting operations are "nor- mal." Manuel Chavez, local union leader, was not available for comment on the Freshpict Co. labor shortage todav. A spokesman at the union head- quarters in San Luis said Cha- vez was in Calexico, and added. "I cannot comment on it." Jack Consaul. president of the Yuma Vegetable Shippers Association, said this morning that for every company other than Freshpict. "the harvesting is running about normal." He noted that "green card" crews that had left the fields have started returning to work in every grower's fields. The youths recruited to pick melons are also still in the fields, but some companies are expected to wind up operations about the middle of next week. Demand for melons today is fairly good, with 36's selling for to mostly 45's. to mostly to and 27's, to SG. with an occasional Shipments todav are esti- mated at 52 rail and 30 truck loads. Consaul said he's not sure how the season will appear in the final tallv. "There were melons lost, but it's hard to tell whether or not its going to be a successful he ex- plained. He added that pickets tried to draw workers from the fields today but were unsuccessful, with pickers working virtually side by side with pickets. He said the workers "just turned around and kept working."   

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