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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - January 8, 1971, Yuma, Arizona                             COMP MfCKO HM010 DIV PELL-MOWELL CO OO DAVID HILL .OLD MCNSfJELD KD OH 44691 EMTors ...WTENOK By JONES OSBORN The Lawmakers By NEIL JOHNSON The Yuma Daily Suit What the citrus growers have been waiting a ttt warming is' coming soon but it may be too late. The National Weather Ser- vice forecast calk for a freeze ttt warning tonight but it may be the last one of this cold snap. "It will be a marginal niiuation may-have one ttt Are Gathering Ft 6 9 Rdl'll The new Arizona Legisla- ture convenes Monday. But tomorrow morning the minori- ty members of the House of Representatives are called into a meeting to prepare for the opening. For State Senator Harold C. Giss, with 22 years of experi- ence in the upper chamber, the opening of a new legislative session probably holds no sur- prises. But for me, preparing to serve as a state representative for the first time, it is different. tXnow it. will take some time the intpeg" as they say. I expect irwill take some time, too, to know the 58 other state representatives. Elwood Bradford and I will comprise one-thir- tieth of the membership of the House. Maricopa County, oh the other hand; has one-half of all state representatives arid One-half (15) of all state senators. We will have to learn to work with those numbers as best .we can for the benefit of our district. Mr. Bradford and I have each been given two commit- tee Brad. is. as- signed to the Agriculture Livestock and Municipalities. With his 14 years of experience on the Board of Regents, it is a shame that he cannot serve on the Education Committee. But as freshmen legislators. I suppose we cannot expect the choice assignments. My committee assignments are Governmental Relations, and Highways Transportation.' I expect to write a few col- umns from Phoenix, about le- gislative matters that might be of interest to this district. No cerf.ain how long1 this first' reguladses- eion will last. Perhaps eight weeks, perhaps longer. I aim to be in Yuma every weekend during that period, whenever the legislative schedule per- mits. Letters to your state repre- sentatives and state senators are always welcome. They can be addressed simply to: State Capitol Build- ing, Phoenix, Arizona. Wide Stretch of South more freeze warning but it will be Vic Cotten reported this morning. What growers have been calling the worst winter since 1937 has taken a heavy toll in the citrus still on the trees. "I believe there is 65 to 75 percent fruit damage through- out Yuma reported Russell Braman of the Federal Crop Insurance Corp. Many growers have thrown in the towel and predict a com- plete crop loss. "We won't know for sure for a week to 10 days, but in view "of the low temperatures, I don't see how the fruit can said Art Warner of the Yuma Citrus Co. He termed the six freezing days result, on the citrus as a complete disaster. Still the county's wind machines continue to turn and burn a million gallons of fuel a day in an attempt to protect the trees from freeze damage. Last night saw the coldest temperature ever to be record- ed at the Weather Service of- fice at Yuma International Airport- a 24 degree reading. The coldest ever for Yuma was when the weather, of- fice was downtown and that was 22 in 1911 and again in 1937. "It was just more ;of the same last said Glen Curtis of Curtis, Woodman and Roach. He said the effect (l urn to page 2) By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Winter maintained its week- long siege of arctic cold in the Southwest today and hurled a wave of snow and freezing rain into a wide stretch of the Deep South. Four inches of snow blanket- ed Greenwood, Miss., and half an inch of ice glazed Nat- chez. Schools were closed in com- munities in northern Louisiana and Mississippi because of icy or snowy roads. Most schools also remained shut in northern New Mexico, including Albuquerque, be- cause of cold-induced fuel shortages.. Six persons died in weather- related auto accidents in the South. Three were, killed by a skidding truck as they stood on a central Louisiana roadside to flag traffic away from their car that slid into a bridge. The National Weather Ser- vice advised that the worst of the Southern storm was yet to come. It issued warnings for parts of fioui- siana, Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and Tennes- see. Ice-storm warnings were posted over interior Louisiana, southern Mississippi and northern Alabama and Geor- gia. Before swinging into the Deep South, the storm side-' swiped southeast Texas and hit the Houston area late Thursday with freezing rain. Telephone 783-3333 SUN 35th lime, 66th Year SENTINEL 252nd Issue, 98th Year Yuma, Arizona; 8, 1971 FIRST TIME EVER A group of Kofa seniors crowd around Shirley Melkows- ki, a secretary in the superintendent's office, as registra- tion for national elections The students, all 17 years old, art from left, Joanne Zermeno, Greg Cubric, Marie Corona, Jacquie Blank, David Smith and Bob Rojas. The voter registration will be a regular fea- ture of the school's services as long as the students are elirih1p eligible. Jobless Rate Hits Six Pet. Soviet Sub fender on Way Home WASHINGTON (AP) A Soviet submarine tender, center of months-long concern about a possible Russian sub base in Cuba, is in the mid- Atlantic heading in the direc- tion of home, the Pentagon re- ported today. Jerry W. Friedheim, a top Pentagon porters that the sub tender and a Foxtrot class submarine were northeast of 'Bermuda on Thursday, proceeding in a northeasterly direction.- This heading would take the 'two vessels, toward Russia, if con- tinued. WASHINGTON (AP) Un- employment climbed to six per cent in December, the highest rate in nine years, despite the return to work of men displac- ed by the General Motors strike, the Labor Department reported today. The development contra- dicted the forecasts of adminis- tration officials who had con- tended that joblessness, which hit 5.8 per cent of the labor force in November, would di- minish when the auto strikers returned to their plants. The report, snowed there were 4.6 million idle men and women in December. This was the same as in November, but the seasonal contraction of the labor force caused the adjusted rate of joblessness to rise by about persons in the seasonally adjusted annual rate. Average weekly earnings of factory workers increased by Uruguay Guerrillas Nab Britain Envoy MONTEVIDEO, Uruguay (AP) British Ambassador Godfrey Jackson wad kidnaped this morning and is in the hands of the Tupamaros guer- rillas, Montevideo police an- nounced, Persons claiming to be wit- nesses of the abduction tele- phoned radio stations saying it was carried out minutes before 10 a.m., when the ambassador, his driver and two guards ar- rived at the British Embassy at Aibar and Buenos Aires streets in Montevideo. They said the ambassador's aides were beaten into submis- sion, and the car carrying the ambassador was driven away by the kidnapers. The auto, which bore nutic markings, was reported found l short time later a few away. The information was carried on Radio Station Espectador in Montevideo. The Tupamaro guerrillas, a leftist urban terrorist group that has operated for several years in the Montevideo area, has held two other foreigners as hostages for more than five months. Claude L. Fly, a U.S. soils expert, has been in Tupamaro custody, since he was kidnap- ed from his place of work last Aug. 7.. Aloysio Dias Gomide, a Bra- zilian consul, was kidnaped by the Tupamaros from his home on July 31 and has been held longer in custody than any other political kidnap victim. A third kidnap victim, Dan Mitrione, a U.S. police expert, was executed by the Tupa- mai os shortly after he was kid- naped, on July 31; in December as a result of a slight increase in average hourly rates and a gain of one- tenth of an hour in the factory work week, to 39.7 hours. The unemployment rate for white workers remained at 6.5 per cent in the month, but the rate for Negroes, which declin- ed slightly in November, re- turned to its October level of 9.3 per cent. Long-term unemployment continued to climb.' The number of persons out of, work for at least 15 weeks passed the one million mark, reaching the highest level since This brought' the average spell of unemployment to 9.8 weeks, up from 9.4 weeks in November. Joblessness was greatest among construction workers, at 11 per cent. In manufac- turing, the unemployment rate in durable goods plants Was unchanged from November but rose in soft goods production from 6 per cent in November to 6.9 per cent in December. Employment declined slight.- ly to in December, a dip of from November; the latter figure was slightly larger than the decline in the entire civilian labor force. In seasonally adjusted terms, the decline in employ- ment and rise in the labor force were somewhat smaller. New High School Program Features Voter Registration Kofa High has a new pro- gram registration of eligible students for voting in national elections. Beginning Monday morning fourschool secretaries will reg- ister students who will be 18 by Nov. the date of the next general election. Today the secretaries went through a practice period by registering a few students and staff. Yesterday afternoon the se- cretaries were sworn in at the Yuma County Recorder's Of- fice as deputy registrars. The secretaries are Shirley Mel- kowski, Marilyn Eades, Thel- ma Amstutz and Jackie Pul- liam. B52 Crashes In Lake Michigan CHARLEVOIX, Mich. (AP) An Air Force B52 bomber with nine men aboard-said by witnesses to have exploded in a ball of fire-crashed into Lake Michigan Thursday night off the northwest tip of Michigan's Lower Peninsula. Coast Guard aircraft and vessels at the scene reported finding wreckage and debris from the aircraft, including two empty life vests and a hel- met, but no sign of survivors. A Strategic Air Command investigating team was to ar- rive today. CLARENCE JONES Yuman Named To Arizona Racing Body Clarence E. (Sambo) Jones, owner of Southwest Meat Co. in the Yuma Valley, has .been appointed by Gov. Jack Wil- liams to the Arizona Racing Commission. Jones takes the seat left va- cant by the resignation of Al A. Marth of Phoenix. Marth resigned last month for health reasons. His term runs to June 30, this year, at which time Jones will be eligible for reap- pointment to a full, six-year term. Donald Butler, former Yuman now living in Tucson, and a longtime member of the Racing Commission, recently resigned. His seat has been filled by Phoenix banker Frank Brophy. Jones served as a director of the Yuma Chamber of Com- merce and was president in 1963. He is a charter member of the Caballeros de Yuma, a former director of Yuma Pro- ducers Cooperative Assn., ami a member of the governor's advisory council on civil de- fense and disaster. Members of the Racing Commission receive no regular salary, but are paid their ex- penses for the days on which they discharge Commission duties. Probe Soys Fire At Pioneer Arson During free time students can register at the main, ac- tivities, guidance and superin- tendent's offices. At Yuma High plans for a registration program are being, finalized and students there will be able to register in the counselor's office by the mid- dle of the week. Warren Conrad is handling the drive. Any citizen of the United States born Nov. 6, 1954 or before can register. No literacy test is given, due to Supreme Court decisions. In addition, proof of age is not necessary as the student's record at the school contains the correct date of birth. At the present time the under 21 registration is for na- tional (federal) elections only as the state and local require- ments still are 21 or over. However, when the state legis- lature meets this month a fur- ther clarification about voting age limits is expected. TUCSON (AP) A blaze which claimed 28 lives at a fasionable Tucson hotel Dec. 20 was the work of one or more arsonists, accord- ing to a special Tucson board of inquiry. The board, in a report releas- ed Thursday night, said the blaze began on the fourth floor of the 12-story Pioneer Inter- national Hotel after two sepa- rate fires were touched off. "The thing that indicates Fire Chief L. F. Peter- son said following the report's release, "is the fact two fires started in the fourth floor hall- way about 60 feet apart." The board's conclusion read in part: "The fire was intentional and man-caused not me- chanically-caused by some de- vice failure and the cause is concluded to be an act of arson." The board said its conclusion was based on a preliminary re- wmiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiini THE WEATHER yesterday 48 Lowwt this morning 24 Timperoture at 11 a.m. today 42 .Hijhttm nftcrnoon 52 Suturdiy 56 Low tonight 28 Relative humidity at 11 20% high this dote 66 Avtngelowthitdtte 40 FORECAST to night: fnne warning tonight. Variabte high doodinot and slightly winner through Saturday. Protection will bo neceaury for fender ]Mnt4 and expotwd pipes tonight port by Cyrillis Holmes, a Cali- fornia forestry arson investiga- tor. Holmes is expected to have a more detailed report for the inquiry board within a week. The Tucson City Council shortly after the blaze began selected three of its members to compose the board. The re- port Thursday followed more than two weeks of secret hearings. Firemen said shortly after the blaze many of the hotel's 112 occupants were awakened in the upper portion of the building only to find the hall- ways aflame and no means of escape except through Win- dows. While releasing the report, the board presented a film showing firemen trying to start a blaze on the Pioneer's par- tially damaged third floor. After several ways of start- ing a fire were tried, the film concluded books of matches were used to ignite it. The report made no attempt to identify arson suspects. inside Sun Churches....................5, 6 Comics..........................11 Crossword....................11 Editorial.........................4 Markets..........................2 Movies...........................10 Women............................5 RETURNED PROPERTY A red teddy bear was among the items picked up yester- day by Phillip Douglas, 2402 Mary Avenue. Some worth of items taken in burglaries was returned by police to Douglas and Russell Dodsor., 2451 Carol after the items were recovered. George Washington Jr., 33, was arrested in connection with the case and is also being investigated for a pair of Tucson munhn. (Sun Staff Photo)   

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