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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: July 22, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - July 22, 1970, Yuma, Arizona                             and ARIZONA tDAltp SUN S E N T I N E L SUN 210th Issue, 65th Year 10 Cenls 20 Pages Yumo, Arizona, Wed., July 22, 1970 Telephone 783-3333 SENTINEL 11 Uhltsua. 98th Year By JONES OSBORN Jobs and Money Leaving the U.S. I expect that everyone under the njje of 30 knows what these names represent: Saab, Simca, Porsche, IJMW, Hcnault, Mercedes Vial, Volvo, Austin, Jngunr, Hover, Datsun, Opel, Toyota, Volks- wagen. Foreign-mode curs, of course. Lasl inonLli, record high numbers of Lliese aulos were sold in the United Stales. Aliout of them were delivered during June, topping the previous one-month high of foreign cars in May. The number of June imports was 19 per cent above the saint month a year ago. So far this year, foreign imports are run- ning 13 per cent ahead of last year. Koreign-inade cars are now caking from 12 per cent to 13 per cent of the U.S. car market.' it least two of trie big U.S. nakers (GM and Ford) are joing to fight back with "sub- impact" models, coining out :his fall. That's good. Every car manufactured abroad, but sold here, means both money and jobs leaving the U.S. Our unemployment rale is inching upward. Large numbers of job-hunting young- sters haven't been able to find work thife.sumincr. The Labor Department estimates there are looking in vain for jobs. A good many of them need work in order to pay for college in the Fall. a connection be- tween increasing sales of foreign-made cars and unem- laying.pff adult vvorkers aren't likely to hire studerits-as sum- mer replacements. I mention the auto industry because it is so extremely cru- cial to the U.S. economy. One out of every seven jobs in the nation is connected, directly or indirectly to autos. When we lose 12 to 13 per cent of the manufacturing market, the slack is felt all up and down the line. Our auto makers and their employqes who stand to lose their jobs are asking them- selves, I hope, why so many Americans prefer to buy foreign-made aulos. The ap- peal of a foreign name can't be the whole reason; price and value must also play a part. Press Club Will Hear Phoenicians The Yuma Press Club will meet tomorrow at p.m. to bear two Phoenix businessmen and an attorney protest con- troversial House Bill 102, also known as the Consumer Pro- tection Bill. Presenting the discussion will be Clinton Kox, Kirby dis- tributor in Phoenix and chair- man of the state Direct Sellers Association; Mike Bourner, at- torney for Southwest Savings and 1-oan Association: and Leo Haddad, Farm and Home food distributor and co-chairman of Direct Sellers. The meeting will be held at Press Cub headnuarlprs in the 01' Trails Steak House. Active and associate members and their guests nre urged to attend the panel, followed by a ques- tion and answer period. llllimMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII THE WEATHER OS I'.irilv rliniily ihrmiftli TlHiwUy. Jiliitlilly wnrmtr cl.ivs.ftnilhrrly lime wiinh'ill-It mph. Sunwl AT FOOT OF INDIAN Hilt Murder Victim Found Here American Bombers Guns in North Vietnam SAIGON (AP) American attacked an- tiaircraft guns 66 miles inside North Vietnam Tuesday after the North Vietnamese fired on an unarmed U.S. reconnais- sance jet, the U.S. Command announced today. It was the first American at- tack on North Vietnam report- ed in nearly a month. A spokesman said neither the Air Force RF4 reconnais- sance phanjom nor its two es- al 1 1 n m. Hil.ly Ilrlilivo liurniiliiy nl 11 n in. corting Phantoms which made the attack were hit. Damage to the North Vietnamese gun po- sitions was not known, the spokesman added. A communique said the an- tiaircraft battery was about seven miles west of Dong lloi. The Inst such attack was on June 25. U.S. reconnaissance flights over North Vietnam continued- after President Lyndon B. Johnson ordered the bombing Dr. Knotts, Pioneer, Dies Here at 87 Dr. R.R. Knotts, 87, former physician at the Territorial Prison and longtime' Yuman, died about midnight at the home of his daughter, Evelyn Fletcher, 13.103nl Street. Coining to Yuma in early 1908, Dr. Knotts was at the prison for a short time while the structure still housed the badmen of the Southwest. He was assistant prison physician under Dr. II.V. Clymer and saw the last prisoner leave on Sept. 11, 1908. Following vvnrk'He' was physician for the North Slur Mine during the construc- tion of the Ajo-Gila Dend road and a captain in the Army Medical Corps during World War I. Dr. rjjiotts came back to Yuma after the war and went into private practice. Before he retired in 1950 he was city and county physcian and director of the Department of Health for Yuma County. Upon his return from the .war he helped organize H.H. Post 19 of the American Legion. He was a charter member and was the post's second commander, serving two terms in 1920 and '21. During these early years the Legion met in Dr. Knotts's office. He was a charter member of the Yuma Rotary and a member of Yuma Lodge Free and Accepted of North Vietnam slopped on Nov. 1, 1908. Since the bomb- ing halt, five reconnaissance planes and four escorts have been shot down over the North, and the U.S. Defense Department has reported more than 60 retaliatory attacks by American planes. Elsewhere in the war, Cam- bodian forces battled a new at- tack on the highway between Phnom Penh and the country's only oil refinery, the U.S. Com- mand announced the loss of five more helicopters to enemy ground fire including one in Laos and four in South Viet- nam, and the North Vietnam- ese stepped up attacks in the northern quarter of South Vietnam. Ten Americans were report- ed killed and 56 wounded dur- ing the past 24 hours, one of the heaviest 24-hour American tolls in recent months. In the biggest action in South Vietnam, one American paratrooper killed and 25 wounded in all 80-round North Vietnamese 'mortar barrage and infantry attack on a 101st Airborne Division position be- tween Hue and the Laotian border. PROBE MURDER SCENE Border Patrolman Ron Dorr, wearing dark uniform, and U. Dale Freeman of the Yuma County Sheriffs Department, investigate the murder of Kenneth VV. Wassum, 54, by searching for his billfold. None was found. The rock-slaying occurred about 1 a.m. today near Indian Hill; Wassum's body .was found concealed in bushes down'-' an embankment. (Sun Staff PhotbK DR. R.R. KNOTTS Masons and other Masonic bodies. He is a past exalted ruler of Yuma Elks Lodge and past dis- trict deputy grand .exalted ruler of Arizona. Dr. Knotts moved to Knotts Merry Place at Silverado, Calif, after his retirement but recently had been living with his daughter. Mrs. Fletcher heard a noise in the bathroom about mid- night and got up to find her father dead. Cause of death is believed to be a stroke. Funeral services are pending at Dixon's Yuma Mortuary. Arabs Seize Jet in Athens ATHENS com- mandos seized a Greek jetlinei and held its occupants hostage at Athens airport today for more than seven hours. Then the plane took off after all of the 53 passengers, except six commandos, were released. An Olympic Airways spokes- man said one of the plane's eight crewmen was also allow- ed off. The spokesman said Aristo- tle Onassis, owner of Olympic Airways and husband of the former Jacqueline Kennedy, had made an unsuccessful offer to turn himself over to the hi- jackers, five men and a woman, as a hostage. IV River Bridge Is Ours To Keep, Cqre for Imperial County yesterday gave a negative reply to an Ari- zona Highway Department's request to share the cost of inspecting and maintaining the old U.S. 80 bridge from Yuma to Indian Hill. The 452-foot steel truss span was turned over to Arizona during the mid-1960's after a boundary dispute arose from the changing bed of the Co- lorado River. Before thai time the California-Arizona boundry was considered the middle of the river. Before being transfered to Arizona, the two-lane bridge, built by the U.S. Indian Ser- vice in 1914, was taken care of by Imperial County. When the boundary dispute was settled with the awarding of about acres to Arizona, the Arizonans insisted on an access road within the bounda- ries to the acreage west of the river. The joint California-Arizona Boundary Commission granted YPG Man Drowns at a portion of the highway, which included the old bridge, to Arizona. Imperial County's answer to the recent Arizona Highway Department request was that an inspection of the structure was indeed proper but declined to share in any of the cost. IIIIIIIIIHIIIHhlillinillllUinillllMIIMIIIUItt Inside The Sun Comics..........................IB Crossword......................9 Editorial.........................4 Markets..........................2 Movies...........................13 Women............................5 Transient, 54, Is Victim in Rock Slaying ByJOHNBAlTIN 'i'he Yum a Da ily Sun Yuma County Sheriff inves- tigators were piecing togeth'er clues in a mystery murder fol- lowing the finding of the body of a 54-year-old man at the foot of Indian Hill this morn- ing. Late this morning, Lt. Freeman identified the victim as Kenneth Walter Wassum, a transient! killed by blows on the head with a large rock neat the Southern Pacific Railroad track. His assailants are at large. The body was removed to Johnson Mortuary where Sgt. Roscoe Ivey was taking finger, prints late this morning. An autopsy was ordered by Judge Krsel C. Byrd. Two Navajo Indians heading into the jungle area found the body concealed in tamarisk hushes about a.m. today. The Indians were identified as Willie Henio, New Mexico, and Jerry Thomas, Winterhaven. They notified a passing U.S. Border Patrolman ,Ron Dorr; 2052 6th Avenue. Dorr was first on the serene and secured the area. knowledge of track-, ing, PJitrojrriiri Dorr immedi- ately .identified significant tracks, of shoes in the area around the body, up the hill and along the railroad tracks. All of the area was searched during the next four hours by Sheriff Travis (Bud) Yancey, Sgt. Val'Quintero and Lt. Free- man. The victim lay on his right side. He wore a brown shirt, gray pants and boots. Lt. Freeman said a large rock was found beside the railroad track. A large piece of skin was found on the rock. His believed the site of the first blow on Wassum's head occurred in that area. Officers said beer cans were found in the area. They theorize that there might have been an argument or a fight of some kind, and at some time, a robbery. Wassum's billfold was gone. After the blow on the head, drag marks indicated that the body was rolled down a rocky (Turn to Page 2. Please) Sen. Wash Plan Crackdown On Maids 'I'he body of a Yuma Proving Ground soldier was found yes- terday afternoon at Senator Wash Reservoir. Victim of the mosl recenl accident in the area was Ronald G. Brown, 2-1. He was attached to Ihe Army Hospital at YPG and had served here since July 20, 1968. The hmly was found by lien Knoll, a U.S. Bureau of Recla- mation employee. Investigators believe that lirown was at an outing at the reservoir Saturday but ap- parently nobody sow him drown. He wns not missed as friends thought he had left the :irca early. lirown is survived by n step- father, Merl T. Giilger, of riiamlwrsburg, I'a. The body was taken to the Johnson Morluary and will be to [''rye Mortuary in Krawley for further arrange- men I. AERIAL CHAIN GANG Eighteen (count thorn) members of the Antioch, Calif. ferent airplanes in order to accomplish (he font, I'lioi.i Pnracenlcr join hands over Antioch to form a unique was taken from fellow chutist Hn.v Cott.inRhnm who slnr formnlion. Several other chutists are trying to join jumper! with a helmet .mounted cnmurri. men slide Can'f Break a Habit? (AP) _ The fire lent this week sold 23 i, the kirn! fire- men slide liou by firemen. Immigration and Natural- ization Service officers said that they will crack down on illegal maids working in the Yumnarea. Officers said the penalty for conviction of U.S. citizens is or a five-year prison sen- tence or both for aiding, tran- sporting or concealing an ille- gal maid. An estimate is that at least maids are working in the Yuma area, however tho exact number is unknown. The officers said the maid often shows a visitors card be- fore she goes to work. Bui women of the house rarely read it, officers said. The vnilors card is printed with salmon-beige ink in tho form of safety paper. The printing says U.S. Immigration nnd Naturalization Service. Over thnl is black ink. On the front is n red border. Also on the front is statement that the cnrd docs not allow em- ployment in the United States, On the buck of the curd ire conditions printed both in En- glish and Spanish lhal allows the bearer to visit within 25 miles of the Ixmler for 72 hours. Some illegal maids come through holes in the interna- tional fence. Some of the maids have two visitors cards. If one is taken away from her and she is merely pickfl up the second card, re-enters the U.S. and doesn't mils a day of work, officers said. Officers said they caught 24 illegal maids in two days re- cently through investigation al the San Luis Port of Entry, ll is estimated that the average salary for illegal maids is a week in the Yuma aren. In Kl Pnso, Tex., illegal maids earn about M R week. Some of the tricks pulled by illegal maids after the womnn of the houst leaves is to Black things from the house in the alloywny. That evening, the items are gone, Invesligntion has revealed Ihnt mmeone working with the mild hid re- moved the items from Iky.   

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