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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: April 15, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - April 15, 1970, Yuma, Arizona                             tDAlL? SUN SUN 127th 65rh Yeor 26 Pages and ARIZONA SENT.LNEL 10 Cents Yuma, Arizona, Wednesday, April 15, 1970 Telephone 783-3333 SENTINEL 27th Issue, 98rh Year By OSBORN The People Will Decide This One After 15 years of effort to regulate by state law the bill- boards that now clutter Ari- tia's highways, 15 years which produced not a single measure of restraint, the peo- ple who are most concerned about Arizona's outdoor beauty are taking the question to the people. A committee known as Ari- zonans for Billboard Control (ABC) has been formed. It has drafted a proposed law, and hopes to enact it into law by the initiative procedure. This means; first of all, that signa- S tures must be collected on hundreds of petitions. Then it would be placed on the ballot, to be voted on directly by the A people. The law if enacted would allow all existing signs to re- j-'i main in place for five years, in order to recover their cost of installation. Then they would have to come down. Cities and towns would late signs within their borders as they see fit. The Arizona Highway Department would provide public information URGENT Apollo Craft Off Course Corpses Float Down Mekong NEAK LEUNG, Cambodia (AP) The bodies of hundreds of Vietnamese floated down the Mekong River in southeast Cambodia today, many with1 their hands tied behind them. It appeared to be the biggest mass killing yet revealed in Cambodia. A police official at the Neak ferry crossing 36 miles southeast of Phnom Penh, the Cambodian capital, said he had counted 400 bodies this morn- ing. But still they came, and more could be seen for a mile up the river, until it disappear- edaroundabend. The stench was overpower- ing, and passengers on the ferry gagged as the boat move4 through the bodies. Some women were among floated by tied together. Cambodians along the bank including the police said they had no idea where the bodies came from. The government leaders who deposed Prince Norodom Si- hanouk have been whipping up an anti-Vietnamese campaign directed not only at the thou- sands of Viet Cong and North Vietnamese troops who operate back and forth across the border with South Vietnam but at the Vietnamese who live in Cambodia. The Khmer people of Cam- bodia and the Annamites of Vietnam have been traditional enemies for centuries, and gov- ernment planes dropped leaf- lets in Phnom Penh Saturday reminding the people of a his- toric massacre when Khmers once rose up and killed DEAR GOD PLEASE the slain but very few. Most signs to assist the traveler with were men ciad oniy .j'-! sign plazas at appropriate loca-. shorts. One group of eight all Annamites on Cambodian tions. The highway Depart- bodies, including one woman, territory in one night." ment and the Department of Economic Planning Devel- opment would cooperate in the placing of tourist information centers near the various en- trances to the state. Signs re- lating to activities on the site Women kneel in a pew in New York's St. Patrick's Ca- thedral yesterday to pray for return of the astronauts. President Nixon stood in silent prayer at a White House dinner and Pope Paul VI said a special prayer during this morning's mass for Apollo 13's safe return. Congress also asked persons to pray for the three-man crew last night during the crucial maneuver, that sent the disabled capsule heading toward earth. (AP Wirephpto) would be exempt from regula- tion. But no longer would Arizona theerection of signs and- iiiill boards in the great open alongside .our main intruding iato some the most and beau- tiful scenic vistas_-of the worlds No longer would our; expanses of montairi and' forest become merely a backdrop for commercial signs and bill- boards. No longer, that is, if the signatures and the votes are forthcoming. Sturdivant Is Reelected Head Of Theatre Unit B.V. Sturdivant, of Yuma, has been unanimously elected 6- for the third consecutive term iS as president of The National Association Theatre Owners of Arizona. He also is vice president of the national organization, and chairman of the NATO Justice and Order Coordinating Com- mittee. Recently, following a na- tion-wide speaking tour .by Sturdivant, more than theatres across the country pledged their talent and facili- ties lo Attorney General John N. Mitchell in the fight against crime. Coordination is being effected by him in Washington with Deputy Attorney General Richard G. Kfeindienst, Her- bert G. Klein, of the White House, and Richard W. Velde, associate administrator of the Law Enforcement Assistance Administration. The American Bar Association, the Advertis- ing Council, and the American Judicature Society are among other entities which are joining in the effort halt the increasing incidence of crime and lawkss- Yumo Librarian Gets State Post Mrs. Betty Thomas, director of the Yuma City-County Li- brary, was named pres- ident-elect of the Arizona State Library Association at a. recent convention. Seven officers were chosen at Uie meeting April 10th and i llth in Tucson. Mrs. Thomas was the only Yuman elected to j serve. Council Checks V Charter Voting The Yuma City Council held a special two-hour session to canvass the vote. on the charter amendment; .and'-two per cent excise tax elections. A few minor changes were.noted. City officials are busy this morning attempting to'nnalize .the procedure so that resolution can be adopted this, afternoon to send the material to Gov. Jack Wilh'ams. The issues won't become law until the questions have been approved by Gov. Williams and the State arrotncy Gener- al, filed with the secretary of state, and the charter question finally recorded by the Yuma County Recorder. Mayor Thomas F. Allt said the Yuma City Council in- tends to hire a city administra- 'tor this year. However, the timetable is not set because ol the unknown time element in sending materials to Phoenix for approval by the state of- ficials. Further, the city ad- ministrator's position, would have to be provided for in a new budget. Budget hearings will begin soon; adoption of the budget occurs in July and Au- gust. City Councilmen yesterday took 24 sacks containing re- turns and studied the figures and checked those figures against poll lists and ballot stubs.' Several precincts show- ed discrepancies in the figures, and councilman resolved those discrepancies. The discrep- ancies occurred mostly in voided, ballots. Two resolutions were adopt- ed by the City Council affirm- ing the canvass of the vote .on both the charter issue and the excise tax issue. For the excise tax issue, the yes vote amounted to Arabs Storm Embassy By THE ASSOCIATED Part of the AAoon Will Come lo Yuma with ASU Geologist I- --W _ Arab demonstrators stormed the-U.S. Embassy in the capi- ta! of Jordan 'then and set fire" to the American cultura] center Thevmob protesting the im- pending visit of a U.S. envoy to Amman, the capital, smash- ed windows the embassy and ransacked its offices. Three embassy vehicles were wreck- ed. The demonstrators hauled The no vote amounted to 755. down the U.S. flag on the em- There were 36 ballots voided, bassy roof and replaced it with the Palestinian colors. At the cultural center, The total, vote was The voided ballots amounted to 1.48 per cent. On this issue, 38.9 per cent of the registered voters went to the polls. Regarding the charter elec- tion, the City Council read into the resolution all yes and no votes from each precinct, however the total yes and no vote previously reported are not expected to change sub- stantially. City officials were using an adding machine to check the totals this morning. There may be some changes in precinct figures. One election board added all yes and no votes in their total figures, rather than showing straight yes and no votes apart from the vole on the eight ques- tions. a bomb was thrown first and then some in the crowd set the building on fire. Three Jordanians, "one of them an official of the Al Fatah Arab guerrilla organiza- tion, were injured by splinters from the bombing and by ran- dom shooting. JlMllllllllllltllllllMUIillllllllMIIUfllllllllllll Inside The Sun Comics..........................14 Crossword....................13 Editorial.........................4 Markets..........................2 Movies...........................13 Sports......................11, 12 Women............................5 Pieces of the moon will be on display in Yuma Friday with the public invited to see them and huar aboqt lunar materials research being' performed at Arizona State University. Dr. Carleton B. ASU professor of chemistry arid ge- ology, who is one of the scien- tists from throughout the na- tion working with the space program, will speak at a dinner Friday, at the 01' Trails Steak House, starting at p.m. He will have the moon rocks and lunar dust with.him for the program. The dinner is sponsored by tho ASU Alumni in Yuma, and by the University's Extension Division. The general public, alumni, and parents of ASU students may reserve for the dinner by sending a check, pay- able to "Yuma ASU for per person to Ron Er- hardt, P.O. Box 28, Yuma, 853M. Also included on the eve- ning's program will be Dr. George F. Hamm, ASU Vice President for Student Affairs, who will talk about "Conflict and Change in the Student Community." He will also speak at a Yuma Press Club forum at 5 p.m. Dr. Moore, who serves as director of ASU's Center for Meteorite Studies, was the re- cipient last month of the Uni- versity's Faculty Achievement Award. The award recognized his leadership in meteorite re- search, and his work with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Apollo lunar program. He also serves as curaor of FROM OUTER SPACE Dr. Carleton B. Moore, ASU professor who is a principal investigator of moon rocks and lunar dust for NASA, will' tell about his research and show samples of moon material at a Yuma dinner meeting Friday. He holds one of the meteroriteg with which he works in ASU labs. ASU's Nininger Meteorite Col- lection, the largest in existence that is open for study by re- search scientists. He serves as editor of the journal of the Meteoritical So- ciety. For NASA he serves as a principal investigator of lunar samples and is the only person performing nitrogen and car- bon anayses on these materi- als. The evening program is a part of a day-long "ASU Day in which will include a workshop on Community School Ecu cation, a Public Ad- ministration Workshop for City of Yuma officials, a lun- cheon for civic club repre-1 sentatives, and appearances by Dr. Moore at Yuma High, Kofa High, and Arizona Western College. Feature Education Panels at PJA Meet Opening Thursday PTA TALK Young Suzanne Lasich is finding out all about State PTA Convention that opens here tomorrow. Filling her in are her father, E.L. Lasich, 1359 E. 25th Place, who is president of tne Rolle School PTA, and Mrs. Gilbert LeClair, Phoenix, mental netlth chairman for the state PTA. (Sun Staff Educational panels on chil- dren's mental health problems will be a feature of the Arizona PTA convention opening here tomorrow. Some 300 delegates are ex- pected for the two-day gather- ing at the Stardust Hotel. Among those taking part in the panel discussions will be A.D. Buchmucller, a national PTA project director; Mrs. Laura Ganoung, a pupil per- sonnel official from Tucaon; Mrs. Farris Vsden, national representative; Mrs. Gilbert LeClair, Arizona State Mental Health chairman; Dr. Weldon P. Shofstall, state superin- tendent of public instruction; and Mrs. Ronald Fuller of Yuma, a nominee for south- western region vke president. Arizona PTA President Marion J. Porch will open the convention at 9 a.m. Thurs- day. Regular convention busi- ness will take up the morning to be followed by the recogni- tion lunchpn at noon. The ed- ucation panels.will Uke up the entire afternoon with the con- vention banquet following at 7 p.m. in the Palo Verde Room. Mrs. Vaden will give the keynote address. Entertain- ment, will be by the Ambas- sadors to the World of Coron- ado High School (Scottsdale) led by Robert Frazier, former Yuma High vocal instructor. Friday will see a member- ship breakfast at and the second general meeting during the morning. After lunch, local units will delve into workshops from 1 lo p.m. will be for first and second year presidents, and chairmen of local committees including membership, program, parent and family life and health and safety. Award of charters and an- nouncement of the 1971 con- vention site will close the gathering Friday afternoon. Failure Could Be Disastrous SPACE CENTER, Houston Control report- ed today that the Apollo 13 spaceship was off course and must make a midcourse engine correction tonight or Thursday if it is to return to earth. If the firing is not successful, the spaceship would mug the earth by 104 miles and probably would have no way to get home. However, officials noted that the chances of making the course correction were "excel- lent." The normal firing would be done with the engine of the lunar module, a powerplant that fired flawlessly Tuesday night. A burn of only a few seconds is required to alter the course to aim at the desired landing area in the Pacific Ocean. If the lunar module engine should-fail, the astronauts could use the small control jets on the side of either the lunar module or the command ship. Astronauts James A. Lovell, Fred W. Haise and John L. Swigert are scheduled to make the midcourse correction at. p.m. tonight. However, of- ficials are considering delaying it until p.m. Thursday, Splashdown is set for p.m. EST Friday. There was no explanation K ow the spaceship veered off a spcalled free'.return trajectory which would have brought it back to a landing on earth even if no midcourse were attempt- ed. The space agency had said -Tuesday that the Apollo 13 ship was on such a path. And ahead lies the critical reentry when the crippled com- mand ship must carry James A. Lovell Jr., Fred W. Haise Jr. and John L. Swigert Jr. on a blistering dive through the earth's atmosphere. Tomorrow Is Here.1 WASHINGTON (AP) For the millions of taxpayers who vowed "I'll do it tomorrow is here. This is the final, frantic day for filing most tax returns. The last of. 77 million 1969 tax forms, with some excep- tions, must be postmarked by midnight or the Internal Reve- nue Service can begin assessing penalties against anyone who delays. Although almost two million more returns had beep filed by last Friday than the same time a year ago, 25 million remained IIIIIHIHWIIIIIIIimillllrfflUIIIIIIIIHmiHI Yuma Postmaster Clarence de Corse an- nounced today that the Main Post Office will ex- tend its postmark deadline to midnight for those mailing at the downtown branch only. imiiiiiimiiiiiimiiiiMMimumMMMiw out as of that last count, the IRS reported Tuesday. It ex- pects 77 million returns. Friday's total was 52.3 mil- lion returns, compared to 50.7 million at the same time last year, a jump of 3.3 per cent. Of those, 32.7 million taxpayers will receive refunds, compared to 30 million last year. THE WEATHER Tenpmbirotllijn.todty Low lonidit 70 45 64 75 45 high thi date FORECAST to Thundjy Siany and winner ud Tbursdny. Cktr udcool torajht SmSet 30% 86 55   

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