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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: January 14, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - January 14, 1970, Yuma, Arizona                             die and ARIZONA SUN SENTINEL SUN-52 Issue, 66th Year Wed., Jan. 14, 1970 SENTINEL 25Hth Issue, 95tli Year By JONES O5BORN Where Did They Stand? Where did they stand? The men and women we send to Congress are there to repre- sent us and so have a right to know where they stand on the issues of the day. The most direct way to find out where they stand is by their voting records. When they vole "Yea" or "Nay" on a roll-call vote their record is there for everyone to see. But when they fail to cast a vote, or when they are absent from their job, their consti- tuents may have trouble learn- ing where they stand. This [joints np the impor- tance of voting. The number of times a congressman casts a recorded vote is called his "vot- ing participation score." That score is compiled at the end of every year by Congressional Quarterly, the non-partisan Washington reporting service. Voting participation is also the -closest measurement we have of a congressman's atten- dance record. Hence the voting participa- tion score is a useful guide to attendance as well as partici- pation of our congressmen. In 1909, the scores for Ari- five men in Congress were as follows: MAY CHOP YUMA CO. Remap Unveiling Kret and Stump Chief Architects LONG SPAN Sen. Fannin........ Sen. Goldwater. Hep. Rhodes...... Rep.Udall... ...02 pel. ,...47 pet. ....03 pet. Diane teller at the First National Bank downtown, sights in on a. model of the long Interstate 8 bridge spans that will be built over the Colorado River.At far left is the old bridge over the Colorado River with the railroad bridge just behind it.Uhder Miss Ro- land's chin is the Territorial Prison. In the right fore- ground is the Valley National Bank; across the street toward Miss Roland is the San Carlos Hotel at 1st and Main.The wide street is 1st Street. The model will be on display in the lobby of the First National Bank for at least two weeks.'.The model .was made by California Highway Department engineer technicians. (Sun Staff Rep. Steiger............'.....92 pet. Shooting Mate Frowned Upon WASHINGTON One out. of five persons answering a survey on violence say there are situations they can imagine in which they would approve of a husband slapping a wife's face. While 20 per ccnl answered yes to this question, 22 per cent said they conld imagine situa- tions in which I hey would ap- prove of a wife slapping a hus- band's face. But when it comes In shoot- ing your mate, the percentage dropsoffdraslically. Nixon Hacks New Cuts from Budget GRKEN Writer WASHINGTON (AP) President Nixon has ordered furl her substantial last-minute cuts in his forthcoming budge! perhaps in an effort lo avoid seeking major new taxes from Congress in 1970. Press secretary Ronald L. Xiegler said today that Nixon informed his Cabinet at a three-hour session Tuesday llllllllllllimillllllllllllMIMIIIIIlllllllllllllll! "substantial additional economies should be made" Iwyond what earlier bad been regarded as the final budget levels for the 1971 fiscal year thai begins July 1. acknowledged that Ihe eleventh hour budget revi- sions could delay until early February presentation of the new federal spending blue- print. Asked if the President order- ed the new cuts in an effort lo fHE WEATHER Tim V.iii.ilile hiiji rkr.i. I i r.t-.- H-.-li Ir-.K t- Tti-.ir-l.vvfii' Inside The Sun Comics..................... Crossword............... Editorial.................. Markets.................... Movies................... .8-B ,.5-B ......-1 .....2 .5-B Sports................. 2-B Worrwn............................5 AFTER 15 YEARS: avoid seeking hew tax revenues from Congress. Ziegler said thai Ihe budgel could be ba- lanced either by cutting spend- ing or raising taxes-or some combination of the two. He said he could nol speculale on which course Nixon would lake. However, he acknowledged thai the budget, as it stood before Nixon's new order, already showed a surulus. To some, lhat suggested Ihe chief executive had decided that furlher reductions in fe- deral outlays would polili- cally more palatable in an elec- tion year than requests for tnore laxcs. Administration sources csli- mate Ihe budgel message will call for a siicndmt; lo'al of around billion lo bil- lion. The budget reportedly will show a surplus of "a very few billion an official said, wilh the help of an odds-and- ends package of lax increases, user charges and speeduns in lax collections. Still hanging fire is the S19.8 billion appropriation bill for the departments of Labor and Health, Education and Wel- fare; it carries SI billion more for education than Nixon asked. The President also has criticized a pending military and civilian pay bill, which would affect (be current fiscal year's budgel. Ziegler said thai (be budget will give lop priority lo nurtur- ing (lie health of the economy anil lo the ending of a continu- ing and steady cycle of ruing prices. KIVA-TV Will Go Off The Air as of Jan. 31st Saving that Ihe Ynma-KI Cenlro market cannot support three television the owner of KIVA-TV has an- nounced thai the station will go off the air-Ian. :tlsi after l-r> years of "After several years of I rying lo convert Ihe operations of KIVA-TV to a profitable basis." Bruce Merrill of ['hocn- ix said in an open letter ycster- dav lo his siaff. "I have come to the painful decision lhat 1 have neither lire talent nor Ihe resources to accomplish this." Leiivenworlh (Bun) Wheeler. Yuma general man- ager of K1VA. said thai appro- ximately HI employees would affected. He said thai Mer- rill would make an announce- ment laler concerning the dis- posal of Ihe equipment and physical plant. Merrill, who has owned the. station for 10 years, said il had shown an almost uninterrupt- ed series of annual'losses. He added thai the innrkc't-could never support three television stations on a profitable basis until it grows lo five times its present size. He was referring to KULU-TV. Yuma and KECC-TV, Kl Centro. Merrill said he will return the license to Ihe Federal Com- munications Commission and liquidate the assets of the sta- tion as rapidly as possible. DyLESSCHLIANGEN PHOENIX (API-Official unveiling of a new plan lo re- district Arizona along "com- munity of inicresl" lines was scheduled today in what would probably be the final act of the special session on reapportion- ment. Bolb House and Senate re- convened the siwcial session adjourned Monday at 9 a.m. lo look over a new realignment prepared chiefly by Sen. David Kret- R-Maricopa. A memlwr of Ihe Republican majority but an foe of Ihe majority plan approved by the Senate Monday. Kret said his plan hews lo a narrow deviation in while preserving the identity of in- terests recommended by the Supreme Court. Kret and Sen. Robert Stump, minority whip, are the two senators named to a joint conference subcommittee lo work out a revised plan acceptable lo bulh houses. House members are Reps. Scott Alexander, R- Pima, and Jack Brown, D- Apache, minority leader. Stump, going over Ihe Mfiri- copa County realignment Tuesday night, said, "It's far- superior to the earlier plan in sticking to community interest lines in Maricopa County." Stump said he hadn't had. time to study it from a party standpoint. Krel said the only incum- bent reshuffled by Hie plan is Rep. James Sossamau, R- Maricopa, a Queen Creek resi- dent whose district would be stretched into the agricultural district embracing Chandler, Casa Grande and Coolidge. The proposed fourth con- gressional district was regarded as the most parl of the reapportionment package- by most of the 12 conferees. The House named five members to the group and Ihe Senate seven. Sen. John Conlan. R- Maricopa. chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee and head of the joint group, is the staunches! advocate of de- fining boundaries of the new fourth district now. The House bill sets up a per- manent commission to deal with reapportionment al regu- lar intervals in Ihe future. Conferees apparently have agreed on a proposal which would give Ihe legislature days to act before turning (he mutter over lo the commis- sion. House Majority Leader Burlon Barr, H-Miuicopa. said. "1 admit I'm disappointed but we'll along wilb (be compromise lo gel something. Let's face it, that's where ihe votes are." The legislature would have to faciions lu come np with an acceptable compromise. Firsl, there are differences over the redislricl- ing jlself. Next, a nnmliei of legislators in both parties are aloof 'to the idea of leaving reapportionment lo a commis- sion. Fimillv. I here is the fbnnjjchstrici. vl, -I- -Hhough to hv.isi. might be one hurdle loo many. The cleared its decks of all other business lo spend the full day on reapporlion- menl. Barr said, "We'll work into the nighl if necessary." The Senate was scheduled to resume the regular session al 2 p.m. In any case, il was probably the last day of the special ses- sion because the legislature will adjourn for a long weekend Thursday to permit its mcmlicrs to go on ihe annual Ilirecday Flying Farmers lour which is to parl of tlu: time in Hermosillo, Sonorn, and Ha ja California. Parker May Be Lost in Reshuffle Parker precincls I and 2 have iK'en remapped to In1 in- cluded in I ho districts of Hop. Gladys C.anlnei. H-Yavapai. in a reappui1! umtneiu plan revi- sion prepared by the Joint Confeience Committee in Phoenix. Mrs. Gardner had pleviously lost Sedona and inherited part of Maiicopa County under a plan to which she vehemently objecled. Sen. David Kiel, H- Maricopa. said that under the plan, Mrs. (Jardner would he relumed lu Yavapai ami Mohave Ccinnlie-! and re- ceive 1'arker. Kret added lhat she would still be about 3 per renl shy of equality in population. Ap- parently, the rcsi "f Yuma Comity will not healfccted. Rep. Charles Johnson. Yuma, lold The Sun this morning that plan afler plan was being drawn np and inn through eompulers to deter- mine accuracy of representa- tion. "We may come out wilb a bill yet." hi- added, "but so fur we haven't found one that <'iio wilh. There's a that wiK nv.-.'iy." Welcome, Winter Visitors! Al Yiimii On-niifilil Trnilrr 1'orli: Mr. and Mis. G.C. Mao Okla. Mr. and Mis. Joseph I'aln- Itailis. Hliiomlield. Mr. ami Mis Oscar T. Kn- gelstad. Wash. Mr. arid Mrs. Oeiali! Wil- son, WeMatrSu'e. Wash. IN STATE LEGISLATURE: Hospital Vote Held Today rails for the Hospital Dis- trict One election will lie open until 7 p.m. in the lobby uf Parkview Raplist llnxpitnl today. Contestants in the election arc George Lindsay, incum- bent; Edward Camijid and Dr. Dale Webb. It is the fir.il three-way context since the district was formed. Bill Opens Tax Barrel to Cities PHOENIX {AP) A bill to reserve collection of certain taxes to the state was intro- duced in (he House today, which met briefly Iwfon: ad- journing to relnrn to the spe- cial session on reapportion- mcnl. The hill, sponsored by Ilou.se. Majority Leader linrlon Barr. H-Maricopa, would make tin: state the chii'f mlleUor of in- come, anil privilege ta- xes. 1ml open the door lo sbar- the revenues wilh the Border Spraying Critics Blossom ANIMAL FRIEND Cheryle Mclntyre, 10, 2213 17th Street, found yester- day's warm weather a good chance to let her hamster, Mathew, play in the grass outside her home. The little animal takes time out to nibhle on a hamster crunch, his favorite snack. (Sun Staff Photo) WASHINGTON (AP) A tiny agency that has worked for years in obscurity trying to keep the U.S.-Canadian Iwrder clear of weeds and heavy un- dergrowth has found itself part of the growing controversy over environmental control. For 15 years, the Interna- tional Boundary Commission of the United States and Can- ada routinely used govern- ment-approved chemicals to help elc-ar sections of the bor- der. Then, last October, Sen. Gaylord A. Nelson. D-Wis., wrote the Slate Department to question the practice of using a chemical he said is also a defoliant in Vietnam. In his letter to the State De- partment, Nelson said 800 to miles along Ihe border had been sprayed, and alth- ough the chemical would not directly harm fish and wildlife, there is an intrusion into the balance of nature. And all of a sudden, conser- vationists and other critics dis- covered the commission- phone and mail business for the six people in the office hup been brisk. Mrs. Marie Sheehy, adminis- trative officer for the commis- sion, said from 250 lo 300 per- sons have phoned or written to complain but "about 90 cent of them arc conservation- ists who haven't even been lo the border to see whal we are doing." Conservationists are jump- ing to erroneous conclusions on some misinformation circulat- ed about the scope of Ihe pro- ject, she said. Mrs. Sheehy said the chemi- cal is similar to that used as a defoliant "by utility, highway, nursery and agriculture de- partments in nearly every state." ing rily. "We're mil trying lo take this money away from Ihe said Barr. "We're just trying lo avoid futuie messes like Ihe one in Tucson where Ibey're dying to collect city anil" state that aren't compatible." Speaker John 1 laugh, Pinia, and Hair agreed thai the lerm in the past is too strong to describe Ihe state's position. "We plan to offer the use uf stale machinery in collecting these said Haugh. "We can't have a misb-mash of local taxes thai conflict with our own collection machinery." Legislative action in this field was forecast lale last spr- ing after Phoenix adopted a special luxury tax on liquor and cigarettes. It hx-rame certain with Ihe new 2 per ccnl sales lax on nonfood items adopled by Tuc- son as a financing pay Ixnjsts for city employes. Ano'.hiT niajor bill which would the valuation formula on gas and electric uti- lities was introduced by Hep. Tim Harrow, R-Mmicop.i. Har- row was chaiiman of a Ways and Menus subcommittee as- (Tiirn In I'k-ase)   

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