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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: October 14, 1969 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - October 14, 1969, Yuma, Arizona                             Editor's Notebook Marijuana: How Best To Control It? Iy JONES OSBORN In three previous columns, we have reviewed the best scientif ic knowledge that is available on the subject o[ marijuana. .Most of the scientists and doctors who have studied mari- juana, and a great many ol (he lawyers and judges must deal with niai'i j u a na of fenders in the c o 11 r tropm, seem to fee] that we may be making the problem more difficult for oui-selves, by imposing such haish and rigid penalties. In our federal laws, we clas- sify marijuana the same as heroin. And the laws are rigid They impose the same penalties for possession, use, and sale of marijuana as they do foi heroin. But a great many well-mean- ing .people don't know the dif- ference. They regard both as "dope" and fear they are equally harmful. Politicians, who tend to follow public emo- tions, are not above making use of this fear. Two separate bills are now before a Senate subcommittee on juvenile delinquency. One is backed by the politicians, who want to attack the marijuana problem with harsh penalties and stronger enforcement. It would preserve the long, mandatory prison sentences, even for first-time possession ol marijuana. For a first offense of selling it, a mandatory pris- on term of at least five years with no chance for probation oC suspension. Nixon's attorney general John Mitchell, himself askec the senators to consider the fact that our federal laws impose a heavier penalty for second-of- fense selling of marijuana than they do for manslaughter or sabotage. Dr. Stanley director of the National Institute of Men- tal Health, says flatly that marijuana is not medically a narcotic. He says it is a mis- take, to classify it the same as heroin In our laws. Marijuana penalties, he feels, are more harmful to the convicted person than the weed itself. Dr. Roger O. Egeberg, assis- tant secretary of Health', Education Welfare under Nixon, says that the penalties on marijuana ought to be re- duced. He says the records show that only a very small fraction of those who have smoked marijuana go on to more dangerous drugs such aJ heroin. Their views are more In ac- cord with the other bill before the Senate. It would abolish mandatory penalties, giving judges some leeway in dealing with various types of offenders. It would put marijuana and heroin in different categories, where they belong. It -'also would make it easier for ad- dicts to get needed treatment. It seems fairly evident that the existing penalty structure has not worked. For it is es- timated that from 8 to 12 mil- lion Americans have used mari- juana at least once. Tt seems clear lhat it is time for a re-assessment or our ex- isting laws and methods of at- tacking the problem. In the meantime, young men and young women, stay clear of marijuana. The penalties are extremely harsh'. Don't make a martyr of yourself for any- thing as foolish as a marijuuna cigarette. TROUBLE livening up your conver- sation? End of problem. Read CHECKING yp the new personal-service col- umn. You'H find fascinaiingand a musing tacts guaranteed to win you fond listeners. Be sure to catch L M. Boyd's CHECKING' UP every day in Hie YHRM Daily Sun AND'THE-YUMA YUMA 284 18 Pag.s Per Copy lOc Yuma', Arizona, Tuesday, October 14, 196? COUNTERS MORATORIUM 783-3333 ARIZONA 95r-No. Nixon Sets Address On War's Progress By KENNETH J. FREED Associated Presa Writer President Nixon, after saying again lie will not allow Wednes- day's blossoming Vietnam mor- atorium movement to influence his policy, has announced he will speak fo the nation early next montli on the course of the war. The announcement of the Nov. 3 address came Monday only a few hours after the White House See Story Page 2 made public a letter on which Nixon told a Georgetown Uni- versity student there will be no change in Vietnam course "merely because of a public demonstration." Still, the timing of the speech announcement and the way in which the letter was released caused considerable surprise. It is rare that a planned presi- dential speech is announced three weeks in advance. And it is even rarer that the White House releases contents of a presidential letter to a private usual procedure being to let the recipient an- nounce the contents. As It Exists In saying Nixon would discuss the entire Vietnam situation Nov. 3 "as it exists at thai the White House noted the speech would come just about a year after former Presi- dent Lyndon B. Johnson ordered an end to U.S. bombing of North Vietnam. Thus, the White House said early November would be a good time for a major discus- sion of the war. While Nixon continues to in- sist he won't allow "his course to be swayed by those who dem- it is growing more and more apparent the morato- rium has grown far beyond the scope of the student-originated concept. Instead of a day in which stu- dents would demonstrate their opposition to the war by staying away from classes for a day, the movement has spread to in- PEACB VIGIL Flag-holding Vietnam war pro- testors stand Jn front of the California state capitol in Sacramento as a list of the state's war dead is read. The group said the vigil will continue until Wednesday evening when a rally will be held on the capitol (AP Gen. Chapman Lashes 'Anti-Everythingers' MEMPHIS, Tean. (AP) 'ho commandant of the Marine 'orps hit out today at "anti-ev- rything organizations" which use "instant and theatrical vic- ence" to draw attention to their pposition to the Vietnam war. Speaking on the eve of nation- Ade antiwar demonstrations, Gen. Leonard F. Chapman said ueh groups have taken sanc- nary behind the right of dissent while supporting the effort of e lenemy. "They employ some of the vo- Welcome, Winter Visitors! At Oncar Nelson'i Trailer Parfci Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Chap- man, River Falls, Wise. cabulary of the pacifists in speaking of this he said. "But from ihe very beginning they have waved the flag of the enemy, burned our own flag, practiced violence and preached (heir own war as a means to de- stroy our present society." In comments tor a service club, Chapman compared ex- treme dissenters with Viet Cong guerrillas. "Like our enemy in Vietnam, they fight a guerrilla he said. "They, too, have a free- dom of movement, and the ad- vantage of doing battle when and where they choose. Their sanctuary is the honesty and in- tegrity of the responsible dissen- ters." Chapman contended that such people are not representative of today's generation of young Americans tut said they dD get more attention because they use (he "methods of sensationalism to carry their -fight. elude nearly every facet of the nation's life. Leaders of 'the four-million member Alliance for Labor Ac- tion announced Monday it is backing the protest movement the first endorsement the mora- torium has received from a ma jor labor organization. The alliance was formed by United Auto Workers President Walter Heuther and acting Teamsters president Frank E Fitzsimmons. AFL-OrO, which no long- er counts the UAW and Team- sters as members, 1ms strongly supported Nixon's Vietnam poli- cies and is not taking part in the moratorium. Further support came Mon- day from W. Averell Harriman the original U.S. Paris peace ne- gotiator under the Johnson ad- ministration. Speaking with con- siderable emotion, the former New York governor said "We're a free country paying a tremendous price for the war and entitled to dissent." Civil Rights leader Whitney Stolen At Chretins A burglar stole from Chretin's 2690 4th Avenue last night. Police said the burglar pried a .door open. and. then pried a cabinet and a safe door inside the cabinet. The burglar left the same way he entered, po- lice said. Partial tracks of shoes in were the only clues .police found. In another burglary, C.E. (Buck) Moore. 1258 18th Street, reported that record albums worth 550, a racing bicycle worth'J50 and a Colt .357 Mag- num revolver worth 5120 were stolen from his premises. A third burglary occurred in a car while Mark C. Westgate, 1065 13th Avenue, was in class at Yuma High School. Police said the right wind wing was broken and a burglar reached nside and opened the car door. Twelve stereo tapes worth S71.40 were stolen and the ve- tiicle was ransacked. Inside The SIM Comics _____________..... 7 Crossword 3-B Editorial ...........-........._....._... 6 Markets ..........._...................... 2 Movieg 3-B News Quiz ....._............._.. 3-R Sports 1-B, 2-B Women ................._................ 3 THE WEATHER iighest yesterday S3 this morning .ri7 Temperature at 11 a.m. today 74 Relative humidity at II a.m. 49% Average hign this date 90 Average low this date 60 FORECAST to Wednesday nigkt: Variabl o hi gh cloud Lness wit h ttle change in temperature through ednesday. High this afternoon 83. ow tonight 57, High Wednesday Sunset Sunrise BULLETIN! M. Young, erecutivc director of the National Urban League, ex- pressed opposition to the war for tlie first time in endorsing Wednesday's series of rallies, prayer meetings, marches and discussions. "Vietnam is tragically divert- ing America's attention from its primary urban and racial the very time that crisis is at its flash Young said. At Whittier College, which Nixon attended as an under- graduate, moratorium leaders plan to light an antiwar "flame of life" as a "constant reminder of tlrose who have died and are dying it burns." A WC Students Join Moratorium By DEBRA SEEGER With considerable attention being focused on nation-wide campus activities concerning tomorrow's moratorium, there may be those who are wonder- ing if Arizona Western College will voice any anti-war senti- ments. A group of AWC students, not sponsored by an outside club or organization, has planned a very informal demonstration opposing the war in Vietnam and the handling of that war's issues by the Nixon administra- tion. To Evoke Tomorrow's demonstration has been explained as a way to evoke interest and exchange ideas concerning the war. Stud- ents, faculty members and community people are invited to swap ideas in the warm de- sert sun. The grassy hill just across the sidewalk, to the east of the Little Theater will serve as headquarters for the. mora- torium. This is where' people can congregate all day, but especially at noon when -a few are expected to step forward to speak. By Anyone Other than posters hanging and handbills in circulation, a letter has been drawn up that will be sent to President Nixon, signed by anyone who agrees with its contents. It states that those who sign the letter oppose U.S. military action in Viet Nam. The letter goes on to state that the signers cannot support Nixon's current war policy concerning Vietnam. The letter will be available to read and sign in the grassy area, also. The students who have, band- ed together in this cause 'are of very different backgrounds. Because of this, the war is the only issue these students can totally agree upon. Interesting and very informative discussion is expected to come from "the gathering together of And Share Many- students- who feel lhat middle-age and older people are close-minded are urging these people to come and share ideas with the group. States sophomore Jerry Seguln, "What I am hoping for is to have people look at the Vietnam situation again. Too often the people who can help correct a disgraceful situation, like this iwinlless war, don't care to bother themselves with such trivia. This apathy con rub off on their children, espec- ially in a small community like Yuma. "We are urging anyone, vol- crs ami. non-voters, wlio wish to sign (lie letter to President Nixon to do so before 2 p.m. In tills small way, we will at voicing our -opinion, which, is ,morc than I can say rCor., many eligible voting Above all, .the AWC mora- ffiajn planners -are hoping'to jetain; a-non-violent atmosphere in which'students anfl faculty can discuss peaceful; -lawful procedures of opposing the Viet- nam The basis of' net ion for Wednesday's moratorium will bo to do something live. For this reason, sheets will be distributed In the early afternoon which name appro- priate congressmen and their addresses. It Is hoped by many AWC students that the bulk of people will be In attendanea by noon tomorrow. Alllxxigh some fac- ulty members have indicated their support ot the mora- torium, boycotting of class e.l Is entirely up to the individual student and professor. Light Quake SAN DIEGO, Calif. (AP) A light earthquake: hit the San Diego area today: at a.m. Sheriff's officers .said -several persons enst of the; city tele- phoned to sayi they'felt.-it. No damage was reported. California Institute- of Tech- nology at Pasadena said it reg- istered about 4, too light for serious damage, on the Richtcr scale. YUMAN HELD: By NELL JOHNSON The Yum a Sun Foster Abraham, 43, of Route 1 Box 21, Winterhayen, was arraigned this morning before Tustice of the Peace Ersel Byrd on murder charges, stemming from a shooling incident yester- day afternoon. Dead is Billy Cook, 35, a tran- sient. A quarrel began shortly after 2 p.m. at 177 Maiden Lane. Bolh men had been at a nearby bar but met outside a short 'ime later. According to witnesses. Cook had chased Abraham earlier in the day with an open knife. Ends Fight Here ffyhw-" FOSTER ABRAHAM Held for Murder. 'olicc found a knife in Cook's pocket during the investigation after the shooting. Pistol Pointed Witnesses also said Abraham pulled the gun during the quarrel and pointed it at Cook saying, "Don't get on me, man." Even'with the -22 caliber pistol pointed at him, Cook reportedly still approached and put his hand in his pocket. said Abraham find INVESTIGATION Law enforcement officers and Tri-State Ambu- lance personnel search the murder scene at 177 Maiden Lane for evidence Vic- tim Billy Cook, 35, shot four times, lies under sheet after he was pronounced- dead at the location. Suspect Foster Abraham, 43, Winterhaven, was arraigned- on the charges this morning. (Sun staff the barrelless revolver four or five times. Police found Cook had four wounds in the chest, stomach and arm. Moments later Yuma patrol- man Todd Hemingway arrived at' the scor.c ar.d Abraham admitted to him he fired the weapon at Cook. "I shot him, he wag going to pull a knifc on me and I shot Abraham confessed to Hemingway. Abraham then pointed out where he put the weapon. In Pocket Cook's hand was in his pock- et, clutching the closed knife, when ha died. Tri-Staffi Ambulance Service was first on the scene but Cook apparantly was dead before they arrived. Abraham is being held in the Yuma County Jail without bail. No datt for a preliminary ing has been set and no request for an attorney has come from Abraham. Services are pending at Dix- on's Yuma Mortuary for Coot He U survived by his father, L.C. Cook ot Yuma; a brotiitr, Clyde Cook of Waco, Tex.; k sister, Gussie O'Dell of Waoo, Tex. and a cousin, Lottie Washington of Yuma. He was born in County, Tex., on Jan, 25, 1334.   

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