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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: August 08, 1968 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - August 8, 1968, Yuma, Arizona                             Editor's Notebook Across the Continental Divide By JONES OSBORN The fifth day of our six-day pack trip into the Rocky Moun- tains of Colorado was to be our longest and most eventful. On the first six or seven miles of our ride that day, we followed familiar stream: the Valleoito. We are riding due north, past Thunder M o u n t a in, Jagged Moun- tain and Le- viathian Peak, all to our left, and all tbwer- ing more than into the clear .Colorado skies. AND'TM'YUMA'ARIZOiWSENTINEI. YUMA 276 18 Pages Per Copy lOc Yuma, Ariiona, Thursday, August 8, 1868 Ph'.ne 783-3333 ARIZONA 128 A MAJOR SURPRISE Nixon Our ascent is gentle until we pass Rock Creek, and from there it begins to climb more steeply.'For we are now headed upward toward the Continental Divide the "backbone of the nation." Three or four miles ahead of us we see our destina- tion: Hunchback feet high. Mountain, -.-Halfway there, we spot deer a fine big buck with four or five does in his harem. Like all deer, they are curious. They stand' and watch us for several minutes before making their Way over the ridge. Silhouetted against the skyline, the antlered buck is a magnificent sight. Council Babe Ruth Councilman Henry G. the quality of water. ell yesterday moved for Josephine commendations at the asked if the canal City Council meeting. could turn salty. Depart- Council approved both of Public. Works Director Winsor said that was .One 'commendation Mayor Thomas F. Allt directed at the Recreation that "at no time was Park Department and the ever a provision to Ruth Board -for a "fine quality of water." He ney" which gave Yuma to other contracts with mendous government for water The other commendation directe'd at the Yuma Chief Arthur Fair- County Library and reported to the Council Mrs. Betty Thomas for officers in the department the Ted Hollin Library. The taken recent courses on brary opened for business accident investigation fnrttn Ai-jlnno WJrrhlwaV Pfltm The climbing is steeper now, with frequent rests for the mountain ponies. But at last, we reach the summit the where rainfall on the western slope runs toward the Pacific Ocean, 'and on the east- ffri s 1 o pe to t h e Atlantic Ocean the dividing point. W.e are at feet, and there iih a great patch of deep snow 18ft from winter. The little girls, both natives of the desert, x can't resist the urge to trade for a snow-seat. They slide down the pack using their ponchos as a seat. it is cold up here on the ridge and although the view of majestic mountains in all direc- tions is appealing, the cutting wind is not. After the usual pic- ture-taking of trail markers and signs, we head down the other side toward Beartown, mous old mining camp. day. Both Recreation and Parks Director Brent Marchetti and Mrs. Thomas expressed their appreciation of Mitchell's com- mendations. UliI Resigns In other action, the Council accepted the resignation of Ed- ward L. Uhl Jr., after 17 years of service on the Yuma City- County Library Board, and 'decided to send a letter of ap- preciation to Uhl for his ser- vice. In a companion decision, the Council appointed John Olin to serve on the library board for a three-year term. In another appointment, the Council named John J. Tschigg to serve on the Electrical Advi- sory Board. The Council adopted a resolu- .between. -the fa- Arizona GOP instructors, training in photog- raphy, identification and crowd control. Chief Fairbanks said the training was not taken be- cause of specific incidents, nor was the department training for specific major areas of police duties; rather it is a program to further train the officers for police duty. On Reserves An ordinance was given sec- ond rea'ding anf passed to formalize the police reserves in the City of Yuma. Two ordinances were given first reading for equipment for in the Public Works Depart- ment. One ordinance will au- thorize the call for bids and pur- chase of a transistorized two- way radio system; the other ordinance will provide for the .pickup. Agnew Choice MIAMI BEACH, Fla. Arizona delegates to the Re- publican National' Convention said today Gov. Spiro T. Agnew of Maryland is an acceptable choice to them for the GOP vice presidential nomination. Members of the delegation in- dicated they expected Agnew to be neither an asset nor a liabil- ity to t h e GOP ticket in Arizona. "Agnew, a first-term governor, is not known widely outside his Yuma County Water Users Association, and the Department of Interior to supply East Main Canal water for watering Smuck-er Park. The contract between the two local entities and the U.S. Government sets forth that the government will two. .dump trucks, ana a truck chassis. Present at the meeting were Mayor Thomas F. Allt, Council-men Walter G. Duncan, Mitchell and Ochsner; City Attorney John Wisely Jr., and Acting City Recorder Marjorie Oliver. Vii Disrupt Er SAIGON (AP) American and South Vietnamese troops have invaded the A Shau Valley for the second time in three and a half months, disrupting the major Communist supply base again as part of their campaign to blunt the big enemy offensive expected in Base back across the nearby Loation border. U.S. headquarters reported that 15 North Vietnamese troops had been killed in the first four days of the operation U.S. losses were two dead and 22 wounded, while eight South Vietnamese were killed and 18 own state. "He will make a splendid vice said Gov. Jack Williams. He called Agnew a man of great sincerity and depth. things I have heard about him have been verv said Mrs. Forrest Bra- den, Arizona's national commit- next month or so. A fleet of 200 helicopters land- ed more than soldiers of the U.S. 101st Air Cavalry Divi- sion and the Vietnamese 1st In- fantry Division in the valley in the northern part of South Viet- nam Sunday and Monday, but announcement of the operation was withheld until today for se- curity reasons. The U.S. Command in Saigon said the allied force has met with "minimal resistance" so far. Probably warned, by the heavy air activity that preced- ed the invasion, the North teewoman. "Most of the delegates were disappointed that California Gov. Ronald Reagan was not the Nixon running mate. Barry Goldwater conferred several hours with Nixon and others early today about who should get the No. 2 spot on the ticket. Goldwater left Miami Beach' before Nixon had reached a decision. Bulletin: to- on two r.unts 6f aiurder. vii -..antenced to- 30 to 100 yearsiv oid I1' iro-' Vietnamese presumably pulled wounded. In the air war, Strategic Air launched 10 missions Wednes day and today against enemy base camps, supply areas anc bunker complexes north anc west of Saigon in the centra highlands. U.S. fighter-bombers flew 111 missions against supply lines in North Vietnam's southern pan handle Wednesday. Pilots were hampered in their assessmen of damage by poor weather bu reported knocking out 10 an tiaircraft artillery sites and cut ting roads in 60 places. m HAPPY 'WINNERS GOP Presidential Nominee Richard M. Nixon, center, gathers his family around him today for a victory photograph. At right, Semi Viole Dies Roll GOP A man was killed north Fla. (AP) Sporad- Roll early this morning rock-throwing incidents were the semi rig he was today in an area of rolled as he was attempting Miami where the negotiate a first serious racial vio- ..Lewis'; but .Wednesday Quemedo, N.M., was driving 967 Peterbuilt said, bands of young illed with maize on the were roaming around road, north of Roll when section 'in which white mo- accident occurred. He was were stoned, cars set elling towards and stores looted during As the road turned night. The original distur- north to east, he apparently was triggered when po- plied his brakes but one massed at a Negro rally. 'ailed to work because of, 25 persons were injured, aulty brake drum, two Negroes who po- to Sgt. Charles Wallace of said were shot by unknown Sheriff's Office in. Wellton, investigated the accident. One set failing to grab as le was turning the corner 100 Negroes were mostly on charges of disorderly conduct leading to rioting. lave been the cause of the truck to roll, said Sgt. Wallace, jewis was pinned in the broke out in the predominantly Negro area about p.m., several hours before and dead at the scene. Sgt. Wallace said he. received the report of the accident at this morning, but it could nave taken place as early delegates 10 miles away across' Biscayne Bay on Miami Beach nominated Richard M. Nixon as their presiden- 1 a.m. There were no canaio The death brought the Police Lt. Jay Golderi traffic toll to both of the men who were Coroner Witten, of were in good condition. He has ordered an autopsy. "The police have not fired body was removed by bullet." ambulance Curry, 25, was Funeral arrangements as he was being ques- pending at Dixon's Yuma in a looting case. Golden two shots rang out in the THE but no gunman was seen. The other shooting victim, CephUs Griffen, was hit by a Highest Yesterday bullet as he walked along Lowest this morning sidewalk, police said. Temperature at 11 a.m. today 97 Relative humidity at 11 a.m. of the injured suffered Average high this date 106 low this dale from broken glass and FORECAST to Friday from rocks and bottles. P a r 1 1 v cloudy through 1- nda.v Slightlv warmer days and said at least 32 stores humidities. High this afternoon broken into and seven Low toniKht SO. High _ Friday looted. Three cars were VP Delegates To Vote From Floor MIAMI BEACH, Fla. (API Richard M. Nixon, winner of the Republican presidential nomination, today picked Gov. Spiro T. Agnew of Maryland as his running mate. Nixon made the announce- ment in a brief news con- ference ,at p.m. He said some 100 party leaders had been consulted. A short while later Agnew, in his own session with the press, said "I am stunned, I had no idea that this was going to happen. It came as a bolt out of the blue." He said he was "pro civil rights" but "without the David Eisenhower with' Julie Nixon, his fiancee, and right, Mrs. Nixon with their other daughter, Patricia. (AP jurned and two were damaged >y rocks. Four newsmen were among the injured and a man.; driving car with a George Wallace bumper "sticker" was- -stoned as lundreds of Negroes circled his wrecked automobile. Dazed and bleeding, he was pulled to sate- in a bar by two Negroes. The violence ended after the Ralph David Abernathy, leading his Poor People's Cam- at the GOP 'convention, Gov. convention Claude Kirk, a delegate, walked through the streets urging calm conferred with Negro eaders. Here I Come' MIAMI BEACH, Fla. (AP) When losing Gov. Ronald Reagan went before the Re publican convention today to endorse the nomination of Rid ard M. Nixon, the band struc "California, here I come- right back where I startee from." Inside The Sun Comids Crossword Editorial Food Movies ....................................13 Sports 10, 11 Women Rescuers Carry Out Dead Miners GRESNVILLE, Ky. (AP) Rescue workers began the slow process today of carrying out he bodies of nine miners re- ported killed Wednesday in a [iery explosion in a coal mine shaft near here. A mine employe, who asked o remain unidentified, said the rescue workers had found eight Bodies in one area of the mine. The body of the ninth miner was found nearby, he said. The employe said it would take some time for the workers to bring the victims to the sur face because the shaft area was small. The first body was dis covered at about <1 a.m. EDT hours after the acci dent was reported. Throughout the rescue opera tion and the reported finding of the bodies, mine officials, po lice and other authorities hav refused to discuss the acciden with newsmen. The entire area leading to th River Queen mine entrance wa cordoned off soon after th accident and newsmen have no been permitted in. In Washington, the U. Bureau of Mines said it re ceived a preliminary repor that the blast resulted from th accidental detonation of a car load of explosives being trans ported deep in the mine. The mine, owned and operai ed by Peabody Coal Co., is jus south of this small coal-minini community in Western Ken lucky. GOV. AGNEW condoning of civil disobedience" and that this was one of the reasons he had been chosen to run for vice president. Had he been president, Agnew said, he would not have allowed the Ressurection City encampment of the recent Poor People's Campaign in Washing- ton. The selection of Agnew, a onetime supporter of Gov. Nel- son A. Rockefeller of New York, was a major surprise. The (Turn to Page 2, Col. 4. Please) iff Nomination Cotton Fashions Steal 1st Bale Spotlight FIRST BALE AWARD James Berkley, Somerton farmer and Mrs. Barkley, (right) smile as they ac- cept a check for from Miss Janet Kehl, Yuma County Maid of Cotton. Barkley, who ginned the first bale o'f cotton in Yuma County this year, was guest of honor at the annual First Bale of Cotton luncheon Wednesday at the Stardust. Don McCain chair- man of the Chamber's Ag committee, assisted in the presentation ceremonies. (Sun Staff The presentation of to Somerton farmer, James Bark- ley, for producing the first bale of cotton in Yuma County this year, w a s almost over-shad- owed Wednesday by a showing of new cotton fashions. Parading before an attentive audience of about 150 persons attending the third annual First Bale of Cotton luncheon held at: the Stardust Hotel yesterday, 18 poised, young women wore to advantage the large collec- tion of cottons loaned for the show by local shops, the Cotton Producers Institute and Mc- Call's patterns. In the absence of Miss Judy Hickman, the Arizona Maid of Cotton from Bisbee who was unable to attend1, Miss Janet Kohl, Yuma County Maid of Cotlon, prosontcd the award check to Bnrkley, who wns also winner of Ihe award last year. In 8 Hours Barkley said the first bale, ginned on July 17th, was pickcc' in about eight hours from 25-acres ot cotton. Sixteen (arm hands picked the delta pine jhort staple cotton at a cost f about Barkley said this 'ear's winning bale was picked me week earlier than last year. The fashion show, "Cavalcade of was presented by .he Yuma County Cotton Wives. Fashions for the show were shipped here by air express romthe national Cotton Coun- cil in Memphis, Tenn. Introduced Mrs. Evelyn Berryman, presi- dent of the Cotton Wives intro- duced the models. Mrs. Gracie Hammons was narrator and Mrs. Chris Layton at the organ, provided the background music for the show. Hits of the hour-long show were a purple velveteen mini- dress worn by Mrs. Sue Monreal and a white evening gown, created and modeled by Mrs. Rosalie Crowe. Don McCain, chairman of the Chamber's Ag committee cm- ceed the event which was spoiv sored by the Agriculture Conv miltce of the Yuma County Chamber of Commerce, MIAMI BEACH, Fla. (Spe- Everett Dirksen said today that Richard Nixon did not win the Republican party nomination on the first ballot. "It was a furniture salesman in Pekin, 111., a cab driver in Philadelphia, Pa., an electron- cs engineer in Los Angeles, Calif., a college senior in Knox- ville, Tenn., and scores of thou- sands of unknown and unherald- ed party workers across this nation. "Sensing victory this No- vember, the unsung doorbell ringers and the unseen party delegates who were never quot- ed by the columnists nor seen on camera were unwavering in their loyalty to the former vice president. "They refused to be swayed by the polls or seduced by the glamor .of Gov. Reagan or the so-called appeal to the un- committed voter of Gov. Rocke- feller. "When victory comes to tha Republican party on Nov. 5th, as I am confident it will, it will be a triumph not only of a man who comes closest to being the political Horallo Algcr ot this century but of the uncounted dedicated party faithful who, never wavered In their faith in the future of their party and ot their nation. "I for one this morning saluted them as I shouted my approval of Dick NLxon."   

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