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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: November 3, 1967 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - November 3, 1967, Yuma, Arizona                             Yuma Welcomes Arizona State Air Conference Editor's Notebook Growth Not Want By JONES OSBORM Tliis is the month during which the United Slates crosses an im- portant line. YUMA 41 The clock lalion experts believe it will oc- cur on Nov- ember 20th. At 11 o'clock on that morning, the "census c l-o c k" in W ashing- ton will tell us that the popu- lation of Hie United States is 200 million. And k just sec- onds later, the will tick off a total popu- of That's il. Our total population increases by 1 person every seconds. Which is 250 more per- sons every hour. 1Qc AND'TH THE WEATHER this T. ;'t 11 ;t.ni. todnv 77 IN 1'ilivc ;it II ;i.m. h.sh tlii- '1'i'j- M !-u- tins ul In Sr-tunl'iy ninht: Mildly tfiro'teirSfiiuritoy, A little this .-iftcrnoon and lo- 71 misty northr-nst winds this '.uoriioon (iiU afternoon 82. toniyht Saturday S3. Sitiwl Per Copy lOc 16 Pages Yuma, Arizona, Friday, November 3, I967 Phone 763-3333 ARIZONA I98 Our birlh rale has eased a hit. From 2G.G per popula- tion during the Baby Boom of 1947. down to 1S.4 per But look out. All those girls horn during the Baby Boom are now beginning to reach the chiM-bearing age. Thus, the pro- portion of women of child-bear- ing age will jump. If married couples would av- erage only 2 children per fam- ily, our population would hold stable at 200 million. But we're not doing that. We average 3 children per couple. So, in another 38 years, the U.S.A. will have 300 million or an additional 100 million per- sons. We won't go hungry. But many authorities think this in- crease will force the American standard of living downward. They see a serious "decline in the quality of life." It will be seen in more pollu- tion of air and water, more -shortages of schools, more juve- nile delinquency, more racial tansion, and more big city ghet- tos with air the problems they seem lo bring. PHEONIX AP) A 25-year- old woman was shot to death in front of Phoenix police head- quarters today and her es- tranged husband was disarmed and taken into custody a few seconds later. The victim was identified as Linda Lee Meredith, address unknown, who was dead on ar- rival at Memorial Hospital. The victim's estranged hus- band, LeVoy Jasper Meredith, 42, of Phoenix, was disarmed of a .38 caliber pistol by an off-duty police officer after re- portedly firing five shots. Meanwhile, Mayor Milt Gra- ham, one of the passersby when the shooting occurred, rushed into police headquarters and called for an ambulance. Charles Owen, the off duty policeman, said, he had just parked his car when he saw the shooting. He said Meredith offered no resistance when he took the gun from him. Romney To Announce His Plans Nov. 18th LANSING, Mich. George Romney today said he will announce his presidential intentions at a meeting in Mich igan on Nov. 18. Romney, after discussing his cancellation of a proposed tele vision broadcast Nov! 15 told a news conference; "I will hold a meeting on Sal tirday, Nov. IS in Michigan. A that lime I will announce whcth or I will or will not run." Bulletin: Martin Luther King Jr. nnd 3.. other Negro mini- sters were freed from Jail a day early' today by a judge jvuh'b.-sald he dI'd not to Yjork o hardship on anybody.The four had served four days of a f Ive-dey King hna a virus condition. Tax Expert Called By Arizona Solons WELCOME, BOSS Janet Wilson, hostess for Bon- anza Airlines, pins a name tag on Edward Converse, Bonanza president, at a de-icer party Thursday evening at the Stardust Hotel The get-together kicked off the 2nd Annual Arizona Aviation Conference being held in Yuma this weekend. In back from left are Charles Broman, general manager of the Tucson airport; Henry Newman, director of the Southwest Region of the FAA; Joseph Kyle, Civil Air Attache in the American Embassy in Mexico City; John Chapin, Yuma, chair- man of the Chamber of Commerce aviation commit- tee; Richard Jacoby, Yuma, committee member and Dr.' Leslie Thomaso'n, Wichita, Kan., director of plan- ning and research for Cessna Aircraft. (Sun Staff By KOBKKT K. WA1.KKU PHOENIX of the contusion over Ihe statewide reappraisal program may be cleared up next week when a national expert on taxation con- fers with Arizona legislators. House Majority Leader Bin-ton Barr. R-Maricopa, says Max Arnold of Denver has been asked lo meet wilh lawmakers to discuss a proposed change in the law under which the ap- praisals were made. Arnold is architect of In s. He said if that should turn lo be Ihe inlont of the moa- "it's in for very rough liules Shift There is .some controversy at the Capitol over whether at. the end of thp long and costly pro- gram, Ihr rules are suddenly being switched in Ihe middle of Barr says no. Other legislative leaders have million, four-year Arizona reap- indicated they don't -1 praisal system. He has proposed an amend- ARCADIA, Fla. (AP) James Richardson was charged on a coroner's warrant Thurs- day night with first degree mur- der in the parathion poisoning of lis seven small children. Richardson, 31, was charged after a six-member coroner's jury ruled he and "other per- ons unknown" administered the parathion "feloniously, wil- 'ully and of his malice afore- thought and with premeditated design." "I just say I'm not the 5-foot-9 fruit picker said aft- er Sheriff Frank Cline read the charge to him. Richardson, who had been in jail since Tuesday night on a technical charge of child neg- lect, was accused of putting the deadly agricultur- pesticide that affects the nervous food eaten by his children Oct. 29. The in age from 2 to violently ill within minutes. Six of them died that afternoon, and the seventh died the next morning. Testimony at the inquest indi- cated Richardson had attempt- ed to purchase double in- demnity insurance policies on each of the children the night before they were stricken. The insurance agent, Gerald Purvis of Palmetto, testified Richard- son may have interpreted his remarks to mean the insurance was effective at once although the initial S3.20 premium had not been paid. The children's mother. Annie Mae, 29, remained in jail on a child neglect charge filed Tues- day. She and her husband were arrested after they submitted to lie detector tests. Air Cargo Story at Opening Session by DENNIS PEARCE The Yuma Daily Sun Aviation seminars ranging from international markets to air safely got under way this morning opening the 2nd annual Arizona Slate Aviation Confer- ence here in Yuma. At the Chillon Inn, William F. Dobbins, of the Foreign Agri- cultural Service of the Depart- ment of Agriculture, spoke on world markets. He said world narkels for U.S. products are rapidly growing. To Private He gave particular mention to private commercial sales of ag- ricultural products. Dobbins said, "Fruit exports in 1956 were SI 96 million and by 19GG had reached 5327 million." Dobbins said overseas export by air got its start in 1954 with :he passage of the Air Cargo Act which was to expand inter- national air cargo and Irade he- Iween nations. He praised the extensive cooperation between private firms and the govern- ment overseas work and pre- dicted 58 billion in sales in 1968. The Story He said to tell the story ot U.S. agriculture, three methods are primarily used by the De- partment of Agriculture; exhih- ts at trade fairs; U.S. Trade Center programs; and overseas m-store promotions. In the first, the department las had 200 fairs in 37 countries. ;ie estimated that nearly 50 mil- lion people have viewed Ameri- can products by this method. The trade center program es- tablishes permanent trade cen- ters in major foreign cities. At present, he said, six are in op- eration with agriculture pro- ducts participating in throe. With overseas in-store promo- lion, interested stores and store groups stage displays of and sell American products for a limited time with minimum U.S. partic- ipation in the cost. He said. "We have a constant- ly expanding program in foreign trade and more and more .U.S. goods arc going into the world He gave several reasons in- cluding more U.S. firms are get- ting into the export market, more foreign firms are promot- ing U.S. products, a growing awareness of export possibilities among U.S. farmers and a grow- ing apprecialion of American products abroad. Dobbins summed up by say- ing, "Total farm exports are reaching new highs. We hope to see more products from this stale and more firms participat- ng in overseas trade." Following Dobbins was Thom- as A. Calk, of TWA who.spoke on the mechanics of air cargo shipping and handling. In a frank apprasial of air- line cargo practices, Calk said airlines are just now getting in- (Tum lo Page 2. Col. 4 please) menl to the appraisal law which would declare that "full cash value" is synonymous wilh "fair market value" in apprais- ing property for tax purposes. "The value estimate shall not consider the highest and best use the bill reads. "When considering market data as an indication of fair market value, the price paid for future anticipated properly increments shall be excluded in the valua- tion process for tax purposes." Fanners Coniplnincil The amendment was proposed after many farmers complained bitterly earlier this year that their land was being valued too high because the appraisal divi- sion had put heavy emphasis on "urban influence." The farmers say it is unfair to ap- ,iraisr> their land at the value at: which it might be sold for other than agricultural uses. Barr argues that the bill not significantly change the pro- gram." He also contends it will not materially affect the data from the appraisal division which legislators must use in arriving at-a property tax re- form program. Steve Spear, head of the ap- praisal Barr. Spear division, agrees says the data is the best possible, and exactly what was called for in Ihe law undei which his department: operates. Barr denies the proposed law change is "special inlere.sl" leg his to be the case, but don'l sec any reason to upsel about it if it should he. Barr says Arnold doesn't think the basically what has already been dune in Ihe program. The Re- publican leader said the bill would provide a "better defini- tion for Ihe public if they are going to take their appraisal: before an appeals hoard." Should the legislature wish to lowered figures for agricul- tural land Spear says bis division would provide some information by the first of the Claim Hike !ti Value Farmers on the Yuma mesa law told the governor that new slate appraisals of farmland ire 'way too high. They lay the blame onto non- farmers, who have purchased Arizona farmland in order to take advantage of federal in- come tax laws. In a letter to Gov. Jack Wit- Hams, the Yuma Mesa Irriga- te Drainage District asks farm and ranch property be re-appraised. The letter, drafted by Attorney Thadd Bak- er, was accompanied by pro- posed new language for state laws regarding appraisals. Cash Value' The Yuma Mesa district ar- gues that the present method of assessment of farmland is un- fair. Existing law says proper- ty should be assessed at "full cash value." This lias bora interpreted to mean the price at which a wil- ling seller and willing buyer can agree Barr says he sees the apprais- il program as a continuing Ihing and he is not surprised that changes may be proposoc in it. H? points out that the appraisals must be updated. lan PHOENIX Public hear- ings he held by a legisla- tive committee in other parts of Arizona if the turnout is good at meetings ncxl week in Tuc- son and Flagstaff. Yuma and Casa being considered hearing Grande are But this method, says the district, results in a valuation "which bears no relationship to farm income." The district explains by say- ing: "As we all know, the many capital1 gains features of the federal income lax law, has re- sulted in (lie purchase by non- farmers of substantial amounts of farming and grazing land hi this stale." This invasion of the farm world by non-farmers seeking tax advantages has boosted the price of farmland beyond its abiiiy to pay off, the district declares. Unjust Ilartlsh'p "To require Hie farmer lo pay, out of farm income upon these artificially established values creates an unjust the district tells the governor. The- district points out that the mining indush-y in Arizona "has carved, out over the years an assessment procedure which. ..jf 7iK, public doesn't show Jin some measure, relates itself cange s K, puc islation brought on by pressures j upi tholl UK, public's fault." to income. from farmers or land specula-! House Majority Inside The Sun Churches Comics Crossword.......-................. ICllitorial Markets Movies Sports Women .....16 .....II .......4 M.Y. Stocks Welcome, Winter Visitors! BliBBIrl copa. He said he is hopeful there hi' a good turnout next Thursday in Tucson and Satur- Shady Acres Trailer Court: Mr" and Mrs. Arllnir Helms, Monte Vista, Colo. Mr. and Mrs. Howard I'. Dickcrsnn, Xogalcs Mr. mid Mrs. Harry C. Kill- on, Hamilton, Ohio and Jleans Committee invites oration, citizens to voice views on tax problems and proposals. Barr noted that public bear- Tin ings were held several years attention Railroads, utilities avid oil and gas corporations have none1 the same, the district asserts. In these cases, they say. the prop- erty tax "hears a direct rela- tionship to income." The farm- ers would like the same- consid- Increase. Yuma Jlesa district calls what happened to farm values in the recently com- pleted, statewide re-appraisal of ago when a budget director hill bring discussed, but only a few persons showed up property. Farm property zoomed I for the sessions at Tucsun and I Flagstaff. to Page 2, Col. 3, please) FRUSTRATION: Launches Fcair PHOENIX (AP) Children's Day launched the 1967 annual State Fair on a 10 day run thousands of youngsters poured through the gates. With children under 12 admit- ted for a dime, officials fore- cast: an opening day attendance of up about from last year's opener. Sunny wea- ther and temperatures in the low 70s greeted the fairgoers. Gov. Jack Williams snipped the ribbons opening the fair at f) n.m. and released some 700 homing pigeons lo spread the news to their home towns. Afterward the governor and his wife were escaped in a horse-drawn surrey to open the first exhibit. Comedian Bob Hope and sing- Vic Vaesnr will headline the high priced entertainment to- night at Ihe bandstand. Yuma police Chief Joe Hic- painted a picture of frus- tration for a suspect today as he discussed the case of the paint store burglary. The frustration settled on Cornelio Correa, '15, of 124 -Madi- son Avenue. Correa is a "Green Carder" although he has lived in the area a number of years and worked as a pointer, brick- layer and general mainti-nanci' man. Victim of the burglary was the Plaza Paint Store. and Madison where 51.222.0G worth LOOT RECOVERED Yuma Police officers look over paint cans hey recovered Insl nlRht from a burglary .suspect. Chief Joe Mickey (left) Holds the money that was used to lure the .suspect into "selling" the paint to Sgl. Carl Cai s or ea At riRhl is Detective Bill Penny. (Sim holo) of paint, brushes and related materials were heisted Wed- nesday An infor- mant lipped the police lo Cor- rea and a trap was set. Detec- tive Carl Cansler was rioted out as a prospective buyer with S'lOO in his pocket. SUSPECT Cornelio Correa ponders things af- ter bcins arrested last night in the paintstore burglary. thai brought Ihe price down to Cansler met with Correa and J3MO. II.-' resisted attempts to hammered mil a business dealM him lo turn over Ihe money before the loot was uncovered. And when the deal was finished, j Cansler produced his police j badge instead of the money and arrested Correa. Fellow officers i hiding nearby helped make it i official. Location of tte I "deal" was close to the paint, j hidden in the alley in the vicin- ity of Kress's. I Front Door Chief Ilickey said that the i front door on the paint store was forced open and then the backdoor unlocked. He said Cor- iva estimated that it took about four hours to carry the many cans of paint, thinner, brushes and trays out the back door and to the hiding place several hundred feet away. Officers found the cans neatly stacked under a cardboard cover. Aiding in the investigation and arrest were Detectives Bill Penny, Boh Phillips, Lt. Powell Elkin's and Sgt. K.B. Lopez. Correa was to be arraigned late this morning on a first de- gree burglary charge.   

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