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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: June 16, 1967 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - June 16, 1967, Yuma, Arizona                             Yuma Welcomes State VFW Conventioneers Editor's Notebook Senators Can Judge Behavior By JONES OSBORN Will the .Senate please 'come to order? The Senate has before it a r e c o m- mendation to censure Sen. Dodd of Con- necticut for using cam- paign funds for his per- sonal ex- penses. And for collecting i twice .for cer- tain travel .expenses once from Uncle Satti and once again from pri- vate organizations. A bi-partisan committee three Democrats and three Re- publicans, chaired by a Demo- crat recommended censure. The bi-partisan committee said Sen. -Dodd's conduct was "contrary 'to accepted morals, derogates from the public tr.ust expected of a senator, and tends to bring the Senate into dis- honor and; disrepute." If Dodd's feUow senators fail to censure him, the reason most likely will be that-, the Senate does not have a WRITTEN code of ethics.j But even before the Dodd case is disposed oft another1 one has cropped up. We now hear that Sen; Edward V. Long of Missourii used his much-publi- cized hearings on wiretapping to advance the interests of James Hoffa of the Teamsters. It is charged that Sen. Long re- ceived for services from a St.. Louis Lawyer who later was employed by Hoffa. Team- ster funds were used to help elect Sen. Long. I am not, in these remarks, passing judgment on either man. But one thing does seem clear: i The absence of a WRITTEN code of. ethics should not be used as "an excuse for failing to resolve the Dodd and Long cases. The Senate is well qual- ified to judge whether such ac- tions tend to bring the Senate into dishonor. Body of Girl, 13, Found at Parker The body of a 13-year-old girl who drowned in the river near Parker last night was found late this morning by Dep- uty Wayne Sanasac, diver for the Yuma County Sheriff's Office. Sanasac told The Sun that he found the body in some 20 feet of water about 75 feet off the shore at Blue Water Marina. The girl, Consuelo Carrillo of Parker, who could not swim, had been floating on an inner- tube with a group of other chil- dren at the time ol the- inci- dent. A boat towing a skier went by and witnesses said the wake turned the innertube over. Deputy Sanasac said that be- cause of the number of boats on the river at the time it was im- possible to determine which boat caused the wake. The dep- uty recovered the body after a half hour search. The Marina is located about two miles northeast of, Parker on tlie Colo- rado River. Kennedys Set PAGE (AP) Sen. Robert Kennedy, D-NY, and a parly of at least three dozen persons will make their headquarters at Wahweep Lodge 8 miles from Page when they shoot the Colo- rado River. They are to arrive at the lodge one week from today and will start the river trip the following day at Lee's Ferry. Bulletin: .remen were cal led to the Casa I Gutierrez Rasturj ant, 520 Orange today to put out a fire caused when-the" de-ep_Tat caught fire. Some Tire ana snioke damage was resorted th- ro ur, iiout the bu- ilding. Engine anawored the 10c YUMA'A'RIZONA THE WEATHER Highest yesterday Lowest this morning 98 71 AND'THE SENTINEL Temperature at 31 a.m. today 85 Relative humidity at 11 a.m. 38% Average high this date 102 Average low this date 70 FORECAST to Saturday night: Mostly clear through Saturday. A little warmer this afternoon. Hlsh this afternoon 100. tonight 72. High Saturday 100. Sunset Sun- rise YUMA 231 14 PASES PER COPY lOc YUMA, ARIZONA, FRIDAY, JUNE 16, 1967 PHONE 783-3333 ARIZONA 80 TALKS TO DE GAULLE Kosygin Leads Arabs' Drive CongWill Avenge Executions TOKYO (AP) Radio Hanoi said today the Viet Cong have warned they will execute some American prisoners if three Viet Cong "patriots" are executed by the South Vietnamese govern- ment. The radio, in a Japanese-lan- guage broadcast, said the three were sentenced to death at a special military tribunal in Sai- gon May 12. The broadcast said the Viet Cong announced: "H these three patriots were executed, American prisoners including a major, will be executed in re- taliation." The Communist story named neither the three Viet Cong nor the Americans whose lives it said would be thus placed in jeopardy. Saigon records showed only one man sentenced to death in the military court hearing that ended May 29. 4th 4th Heaviest Used Artery Traffic on Yunm's 4th Ave- nue both ways across the new Colorado River bridge contin- ued its increase during May with a (i.o per cent hike in average daily traffic. It is the 4th most heavily travelled ar- tery (both ways) in the state. The Arizona, Highway De- partment reported the aver- age number of vehicles per day was compared to during May, 1906, an in- crease of 515. Topping the list of traffic carrying highways was North Central Avenue in riioenix with vehicles. Next was U.S. CO at Tempo combined north and south flows with and third was Interstate 10 at Phoenix, (both with Tlie maximum hourly traf- fic on U.S. 80 at Yuma, (4th Avenue) was 730 counted from 1 to 3 p.m. Tuesday, May 30th; and the highest dai- ly count was on Satur- day, May 37th. Wants Limit Set MANILA (AP) Philippine Foreign Secretary Narciso Ra- mos said today the Philippine air force wants to set a limit on low long tlie United Slates may use one of Us bases as a trans- shipment point to Vietnam. VFW convention delegates this morning were (from left) Conrad Thomas, state commander; Gov. Jack Williams and George Gamard, con- vention chairman. The VFW-auxiliary joint business session was held at the post home. Additional photo Page 11. (Sun Staff Gov. Jack Greets VFW Confab Delegates to the VFW 47th annual convention which opened here yesterday were greeted by Gov. Jack Williams this morn- ing at the post home. Gov. Williams told the dele- gates that America needs "the same patriotic reaction the Is- showed." He criticized recent rioting, draft card burning and civil dis- obedience. Was Enroute The governor, who was en route to Camp Roberts, Calif., was accompanied by his wife. Also at this morning's joint VFW auxiliary business ses- sions, were Sen. Harold C. Giss, Mayor Thomas F. Allt, mem- bers of the Yuma County Board of Supervisors; Col. Joseph Cul- [en commander, YPG and Act- ing Commander, Lt. Col. Walter Sienko, MCAS. Following a luncheon held to- day at the American Legion Hall, delegates will meet at the post'home for a series of busi- ness meetings. Dodd Wins Del Senate Censure Case By JOHN CHADWICK WASHINGTON (AP) Sen. Russell B. Long took up the de- fense of Sen. Thomas .1. Dodd .n the Senate today after a vote on the censure case of the Con- necticut Democrat was post- poned until next week. Long is the Louisiana Demo- crat: who has appointed himself Dodd's chief defender. lie challenged the Senate elh- ics committee's double-hilling count against his colleague, that is, that Dodd collected travel money twice for the same trips. Culled Long called on Dodd to get to his 'feet and "swear that what you are going to sny is the irulh, so help you only to have Dodd say that his recollec- tion didn't square with the ac- count Long had just given of a Dodd trip made to Philadelphia in March Long said that: Dodd went to Philadelphia to talk to a man about an investigation of ball- bearing shipments to Russia, adding this was legitimate gov- ernment, business for which Dodd was entitled to reimburse- ment: from the Senate. However, Dodd said he was not sure that this was the oc- casion on which he had checked on the ball-bearings. The Philadelphia trip was one of seven instances in which the ethics, committee found Dodd had collected air that fare from botli the Senate and pri. vale groups. Postponement of the action on (lie censure resolution until next week was announced after Dodd said he needed more time to prepare "my. final A Post Commander's dinner is planned for p.m. tonight at Eagles Hall. A Parade Tomorrow at a.m., VFW conventioneers will assemble for a parade. Starting from 1st Street and Main, delegates will mareh up Orange Avenue to 1st Avenue and then to the post home. Leslie M. Fry, VFW national commander will arrive here Saturday afternoon at p.m. The VFW commander will speak Saturday night at the an- nual banquet scheduled for 7 p.m. at the Stardust: Hotel. A commander's ball, at the post iiome, will follow the banquet. The convention will conclude Sunday with a joint installation of officers at the Yuma Post STo. 1763 headquarters, 2nd Street and 1st Avenue. Warmth Is Moving Here The weather will be mostly clear and a little warmer today and Saturday. A high of 100 is expected for today and the low of 72 is the forecast tonight, for Yuma and vicinity. Yesterday the high was 9S and tliis morning we had a warm 71 here. The humidity yesterday ranged from 62 to 13 per cent. The five-day forecast indi- cates no rain through Wednes- day. Temperatures will average slightly above normal for this period, with a warming trend expected later hi the week. Hospital Planned By Stalin's Daughter NEW DELHI, India, (API Svctlnna Stalin plans to finance new women's hospital in her late Indian husband's home- town, says the Hindustan Times. The paper said Thursday Svetlana had written her brolh- cr-in-law asking for details of hospital requirements of Kalak- ankar, a small village about 300 miles southeast of Delhi. According to the paper the hospital will serve as a memori- al to her late husband. Xrij-sh Singh, who died in Moscow last .October. Inside The Sun Churches Comics Crossword Editorial Markets IVlovies ..._... Sports Women M 9 8 4 6, 7 III llI'l'WBillPB.nilllliiillliHiBi'Wll I'll.....Mull! Riots Flare, Coo In Troubled Cities By THE ASSOCIATED PKESSI of the convictions and some A rash of fires, apparently caused by gasoline bombs, and other incidents of racial vio- lence occurred in Daylon, Ohio, Thursday night while relative quiet was enforced in Cincinnati by police and an expanded force of National Guardsmen. About 15 fires were reported in Dayton, including a spectac- ular blaze that destroyed five adjoining buildings housing businesses and residences. Police Maj. R.M. Igleburger said there was also a lot of rock- throwing. This led to the cancel- lation of all bus service to Day- ton's West Side because of "po- tential danger to the public." Looting Reported Some window-smashing and looting was reported by police who said there was no mass forming of rioters. While the racial trouble con- tinued in the Ohio cities, Tam- pa, scene of three nights of marked a day of peace by disbanding a 500-man National Guard force. Cincinnati went through the fourth straight night of racial violence despite the increase in the National Guard force from BOO to more Machine Guns Armed with machine guns and rifles with bayonets, the guardsmen accompanied police into the predominantly Negro areas that have been trouble spots. H. Rap Brown, chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordi- nating Committee and a black power advocate, issued what he termed a "declaration of war" in the Walnut Hills area of Cin- cinnati. He also demanded that Negroes jailed in connection with the rioting be freed. More than 310 have been ar- rested this week and 12 rioters were convicted Thursday of vio- lating the State Riot Act, fined ?500 each and sentenced to a year in the city workhouse. Tension High Tension mounted as the result Demand Is Good For Our Melons Cantaloupe shipments yester- day showed a very good de- mand. Yesterday's total of 52 rail and truck equivalents brought the total shipments to .dale to 468 with volume continuing heaviest in jumbos. Jumbo 45s brought 58 to 58.50; 3Gs sold for 510; standard 45s brought a price of to S5, and pony 45s, mostly S3. The F.O.B. market was steady. spectators shouted, tlie Although none of the new pris- oners had been admitted to the city's ancient workhouse, 400 inmates set fire to their mat- tresses, smashed windows and threw debris out Hie windows. About 130 policemen and Na- tional Guardsmen were rushed 1o the building and tear gas was used to restore order Tampa officials, in addition to withdrawing National Guards- men, also pulled the 150 mem- bers of the City Youth Patrol from the streets. Authorities were quick to praise the Negro youngsters who patrolled the streets of Ne- gro slums Wednesday night, telling potential troublemakers to stay cool. v y f 5 Begin Work On Negro Needs TAMPA, Fla. (AP) Five young Negroes who went into the streets to negotiate calm in the critical horn's of Tampa's racial rioting wont on the city payroll today to report the needs of the Negro community. Mayor Nick Nuccio assigned the young of whom were unemployed to a task force to stay in touch with the mood of the community and survey its immediate griev- ances. Nuccio said before last Sun- day's outbreak of looting and burning, following the shooting of a Negro burglary suspect by a white policeman, he had been considering the city's commu- nications with the Negro com- munity to be excellent." Italian Woman Has 3rd Set of Triplets C'ALTANISKTTA, Sicily (AP) Gnulii Franco, SI, hirth Thursday tit her lliiril set of triplets. Sho has horn married nine and now has nine children. Death Investigated NOGALES, Son., Mexico (API were investigating the death o[ lirvin Steven Rosen- reply to make the majority of 62 burg, 23, of Tucson, whose body was found late Thursday in his hotel room here. Will Plead Anti-Israel Before U.N. PARIS route to his first visit to the United States, Soviet Premier Alexei N. Kosy- gin stopped over in Paris today and opened talks with President Charles de Gaulle on the Mid- dle East. As the two met in Elysee Palace, there was speculation that Kosygin would attempt to enlist De Gaulle's support for the Soviet drive to force Israel to give up its conquest of Arab territory in last week's war. After talks with De Gaulle'. Kosygin win fly on late today to plead tlie Arab cause against Israel at the United Nations. Paris Welcome The Soviet Premier was wel- comed at Orly Airport by For- eign Minister Maurice Couve de Murville. The Kosygin-De Gaulle talks were set up hurriedly Thursday as Kosygin prepared to leave for the United Nations and a special General Assembly meet- ing on the Middle East ques- tion. With Kosygin's 50-man Soviet delegation is Foreign Minister Andrei A. Gromyko, an ex- perienced negotiator at U.N. meetings. First Visit Kosygin is the first Soviet pre- mier to appear at the United Nations since Nikila S. Khru- shchev pounded his shoe on a desk there in I960. The premier's trip also sets (he stage for possible lalks with President Johnson. It would be the first U.S.-Soviel summit meeting since President John F. Kennedy and Khrushchev con- ferred in Vienna in 1961. Kosygin was due in Paris about 10 a.m. EDT and was to see De Gaulle two hours later. Soviet sources in the French capital said the premier would continue on tonight to New York. Summit Meeting? Amid speculation that Kosy- ;in's first visit to the United States would also produce his first meeting with Johnson and a summit discussion on Viet- nam, White House press officer George Christian said Thursday that the President "would, of course, be glad to see" the So- viet premier if Kosygin wants to see Johnson. Secretary-General U Thant, rolling the 122 U.N. members on he Soviet request for the as- sembly session. Thursday night needed only one more favorable that would oblige him to call it within 2-1 hours. U.N. sources said that if the clinching reply was on his desk when his office opened at 9 a.m. EDT, he wouM convene the first meeting for 9 or a.m. Sat- lurday. trying not to make it too early in the morning for Ihe del- legates. I fit A.u-rci' When an aide closed the office for the night at 11 p.m.. 61 coun- tries, including France, had concurred in the Soviet bid for the emergency session. Only one. the United States, dis- approved, while Brit :iu ai'd Ice- land said they would concur if the majority did. At the opening iiie assembly is expected to iv-eli ci Afghan Ambassador Abdul Rah- man Paxhwak as president and deal with other preliminaries. The expectation is tint Kosy- gin will open the debate Monday with a demand for the immedi- ate withdrawal of Israeli forces from the areas of Kgypt, Jordan and Syria they occupied in the war List week. GUARDED policeman and an Ohio National Guards- man stand guard over the U. of Cincinnati commencement last evening. Many high school commencements were called off because of the racial disturbances which have racked the city since Monday night. Tlie university gave out decrees. (AP N.Y. Stocks (Ivl. note: The X by last sal''O tiohorts Scott Co. thai IiTO Unity the Dow- .loncs inilusuUU was   

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