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Yuma Daily Sun: Sunday, November 21, 1965 - Page 1

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - November 21, 1965, Yuma, Arizona                             Yuma Crims Clip Kofa 59-0, Get Playoff Berth Editor's Nottbook A Thinking Mans Move Against TB By JONES OSBORN Yuma County produced 44 hew cases of tuberculosis this year. Contrary to what most of us have allowed ourselves to believe, TB is far from whipped. In some respects t u b e r c u- losis is more of a problem than ever. II is still the second big- gest k ii 11 e r among conta. gious diseases. It claimed American lives last year. 15c THE SUN SUNDAY Family Weekly Color Comics Latest News TV Magazine YUMA 212 52 PAGES YUMA, ARIZONA, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1965 PHONE 783-3333 ARIZONA 5 Calls for Boycott of Rhodesia An estimated 35 million Americans are infected. At least of them need Specialized help, if they arc go- ing to survive. The trouble is that tubercu- losis is so very, very contagi- ous. One person can pick up the gerrn; quickly his whole family, children and all, arc in- fected. That explains why new cases are reported every year. This isn't one of those far- away national problems that we can safely ignore. Those 44 new cases of TB are right here among us. In all, there are 164 cases known to the public health de- partment. About 20 per cent of them are hospitalized. What can the thinking citizen do to help protect himself? Two easy things: 1) Buy those Christmas seals that were mailed to you ear- lisr this week. Your money helps right here in Yuma Coun- ty- 2) Step into the mobile X-ray truck some, afternoon in Decem- ber and get a free picture of your chest. It could save your life. JFK Park Gets Sign Monday 'A sign will be erected at 10 a.m. Monday at the John F. Kennedy Memorial Park by the Yuma County Democratic Wom- en's Club. The sign was designed by the Recreation and Park Depart- ment and it was constructed by the Western Electric Advertis- ing Company of Yuma. public is invited to at- tend the event. Mayor Thomas F. Allt and members of the City Council are scheduled to attend, as well as the follow- ing persons: Sen. Harold C. Giss, Rep. Charles Johnson, the Board of Supervisors: Chairman James I'uquay, Bob Nisscn, and Clark Yarwood; members of the Re- creation and Park Department and Recreation and Park De- partment Director James Gian- nnngelo; Democratic Central Committee Chairman James E. McLay; Mrs. Josephine Burton, president of the Democratic Women's Club, and the com- mittee which secured the sign: Miss Charlene Maloney, Mrs. rjellie Hammond, and Mrs. Mil- dred Ward. He Must've Forgotten J (AP) Mrs. Fam- e-la Curtin, 21, won a divorce after she testified that her hus- band went out for a package of cigarettes two hours after their wedding 15 months ago and hasn't returned. Her attorney, Norman Beck- er, told Circuit Judge Benjamin Wham that Henry Curtin, 23, told his bride he was "going cut for a few minutes." Mrs. Curtin said the last time she heard from her husband, a native of Ireland, he was back In Dublin. Insidt Tht Sun Business Comics Crossword Editorial Gardener Movies Sports Women 10 1 Rights Hearing Is Ended Here 2 Killers Back to Death Row A week-long hearing into the question of possible violation of the rights of two confessed kill- ers was ended here Friday. Judge Ross Jones signaled the end of the hearing at Friday afternoon. He took the matter under advisement and is expected to present his find- ings to the Arizona Supreme Court when he finishes study- ing the case. It will be up to the Supreme Court, which or- dered the hearing, to determine whether or not Joseph Janovic Jr. and Lawrence Kruchten, both 25, should have a trial. To Death Bow The two were returned to Ar- izona State Prison death row Saturday morning. They have seen there over two years un- der the death sentence im- posed by Yuma County Superi- or Court Judge William W. Na- bours. Both confessed the rock slaying of Sally Ann Pierce, 20, of Buena Park, Calif., near Wendcn. Mrs. Joseph Janovic Sr. was he only witness to testify Fri- day afternoon. She testified that ler son had teen drinking heavily the night he was cap- tured by the FBI. Officers had previously testified that Janovic lad not appeared to have been drinking. Mrs. Janovic told the court she had only heard her son's voice over the phone but knew ie had been drinking. She said she had not told him the FBI lad been at her home and that she had given his address to hem. "I was afraid he'd be she sobbed in explana- ion. Not Afford The witness also said the family could not afford psychia- tric treatment for Joe Jr. when ie was discharged from the Marine Corps even though it vas recommended by Navy doctors. She did state that she vould have seen to his getting a psychiatric examination prior o his sentencing if she had mown he had not been exam- ned. After Mrs. Janovic concluded ler testimony, the judge an- nounced that Janovic .would get an examination at his own ex- >ense and that Kruchten be furnished with a free transcript of the concluded hearing. He denied a request for one for Janovic. Asked who was to pay for such items Judge Jones said he did not know. "Among other things I did not learn was who was to pay the transportation for this judge to and from Phoenix." All attorneys stipulated that it the judge wished to take more testimony, he could do so in his own courtroom in Phoe- nix. Judge Jones incidated he did not expect any more testi- mony would be needed. Candidate Culling Begun by State GOP PHOENIX (AP) Arizona's Republican leaders met for five hours Saturday in what State Chairman Harry Rosenzweig called an unprecedented at- tempt to unify the party behind a candidate for governor. The closed-door session drew more than 60 party leaders in- cluding county chairmen, state committee officers, elected state and county officials and Young Republican leaders. At least five candidates were said later to have made them- selves tentatively available for the race against Democratic Gov. Sam Goddard's expected bid for re-election to a second term next year. The fiver are Richard Klein- dienst, the unsuccessful GOP opponent of Goddard last year; Kep. John Haugh, R-Pima; for- mer Atty. Gen. Robert Pickrell, Maricopa County Juvenile Court Judge Jack D. H. Hays and former Mayor Sam Mardian. Wihdraws Marshall Humphrey, a Chand- ler cotton farmer and former state representative, was pre- sent but reportedly asked that he not be considered. Former Phoenix Mayor Jack Williams, although not present, was con- sidered another possible nomi- nee. The presence of Evan Mech- am, the Republican's' 1962 'cand- date for the U.S. Senate, lent party harmony to the meeting. Mecham lost the nomination for governor to Kleindienst in a bloody primary campaign last year. Mecham reportedly is interest- ed in running for Congress in the Third District if it is re- vamped to include Glendale, where he lives. Willing Judge Hays confirmed later that he is willing to be the GOP nominee for governor, but he said he would resign his court post before becoming a candi- date. "We can't afford the luxury of fighting among Rosenzweig told the group. Later, he said he was "extremely pleased at the good feeling we all left with Every- body spoke frankly and honestly without any recriminations over past differences." Added the party chairman: "We dispelled any idea that (Turn to Page 2, Col. 1, please) Nab Tacoma Kidnaper, Ransom TACOMA, Wash. 34- year-old 'carpenter was charged with first degree kidnaping Sat- urday after turning himself in and leading officers to of the ransom paid for young Charles Hyde 111. Sheriff Jack Beri-y said Til- 'ord G. Baker, married and the father of two children, sur- rendered at 4 a.m. and identi- 'ied two other men as involved in the case. Baker was charged n Justice Court at p.m. OVER-EXPOStIKE Kofa High halfback Chris Bock (with ball) lost his shirt on this play Friday night at Kofa Stadium. Beck's jersey was ripped away by Yuma High defensive halfback Tom Kelly. The shirt didn't rip quite enough, how- ever, and Beck was brought down on the play. Yuma routed the Kings, 59-0, and will represent Class IAA in a playoff game with Glendale High Wednesday. Pic- tures, stories on sports pages 8-9. (Sun Staff Photo) Raps Radicals On Campuses SCOTTSDALE (AP) A member of the Arizona Board of Regents said Saturday that radicals on college campuses trample on th? rights of the 'najurity of students. Arthur B. Shellnnbcrg told the 'umual conference of Arizona Tunior College Boards "we must consider Hie majority of stu- denls." I Dog That Bit 2 Boys Here I Is Found To Be Rabid 1 The second positive rabies case within a month was reported Friday to the Humane Society, the official right arm of Yuma County animal control. Harold Deacon, manager of the animal compound on Figueroa Street just north of 1st Street, said the positive report was received late Friday from Phoenix on a stray dog. The dog was picked up last Monday night in the Mesa Vista Homes area. Deacon said the dog attacked two persons, biting them. After receipt of the positive rabies report, Charles Rowden, 16, 183 Kaji Homes, and Brian Wheatley, 4, 197 Kaji Homes, the two victims, were notified im- mediately. One is being treated by an MCAS doctor, and the other is being treated by a nonmilitary doctor, Deacon said. Deacon explained further that a pun was bitten in the same sequence of events. The pup has been confin- ed and is under observation. The stray dog was suf- fering the last stages of rabies, Deacon reported, and it died Wednesday. The head was sent to Phoenix for examination and laboratory analysis. Deacon said the society received many calls from the Mesa Vista Homes area in a short time Monday night. SCHOOL BOND ISSUE: Tuesday Is Bond Vote Here On New Junior High School WINS TITLE Lesley Langley, Miss United Kingdom, shows her style at London's Lyceum ball- room Friday night dur- ing the competition. She is 21, 5 feet 6 inches tall, and measures a delight- ful 37-24-37. 5th and Lust in a Scries Editor's note is the last in a scries of articles ex- plaining the proposed bond Issue for Yuma Elemen- tary Sclimil District Jio. 1. Tuesday, the taxpayers of Yuma School District are being risked by school trustees to ap- prove the issuance of in general obligation The bonds are needed, school officials point out, to build a complete new junior high school on 15 acres of land which the district already owns, adjoin- ing Sanguinctti Park on the west. Tho new Thool will house Bth, 7th and 8th graders. The 600 students who will attend the new school will be drawn from several other schools in the- district in order to relieve overcrowded conditions. At the present time, 111 classrooms in the district arc overcrowded. That is 57 per cent of all avail- able classrooms. The bonds, if approved, will cause an increase in the dis- trict's tax rate to pay off iis tended indebtedness of about 12'i cents per of assessed valuation. To a homeowner who is assessed for tax purposes at this will cost about 54.50 the first year. Who Can Vote? Who is eligible to vote in Tuesday's election? Slate law says that any per- son who 1) is a registered voter of the state, and who 2) has re- sided in the school district six months prior to the election, and who 31 is a real' property taxpayer of the district is eli- gible to vote. A person is considered a real property taxpayer if he has paid a tax on real property. If either the husband or the wife is a veteran and takes his ex- emption for taxes, they are both eligible to vote if the oth- er mate pays taxes on the oth- er half of their community property. Where to Vote There will be two polling places: 1) In the Administration Building at 450 Bth Street; and 2) at Gila Vista school cafeteria or. Arizona Avonue at 22nd Street. Polls will be open from 6 a.m. until 7 p.m. Okay 3rd Dormitory For Arizona Western A third dormitory to accom- modate 130 more students and an outside farm field laborato- ry at Arizona Western College (AWC) were approved Friday by the State Board of Direc- tors for Junior Colleges. The dormitory will be built west of Kino House and Dp Anza House and between the two existing dormitories. All dormitory entrances will face a grassed courtyard. Total capa- city will be 390 students. Sched- uled completion is by next tember. Bids on the new dormitory are expected about Dec. 30th, according to Dr. John B. Barnes, AWC president. The project will be financed through revenue bonds ap- proved by the state board. Dr. Barnes emphasized that the project is known as "self-liq- uidating." The bonds, the pre- liminary plans, and the project calendar were approved by the board late last week. .May Slmly Also approved by the state hoard is a farm field laboratory where agricultural .students may study crop as- pects. Dr. Barnes said the proj- ect is an effort ot tie-in the theory of farming with the practice of farming- Dr. Barnes also emphasized that no production for sale and no research will be conducted at the farm field laboratory. The will be lev- eled and irrigation ditches will be installed. The plot will be located south of the agricultur- al complex toward the exten- sion of 24th Street. Xotini; that the farm field laboratory is "related to our Dr. Barnes said cit- rus seedlings and an ornament- (Turn to Page 2, Col. 3, Please) U.S. Bans Sugar from That Nation UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (AP) The U.N. Security Council Saturday called for a vorldwide economic boycott ngainst Southern Rhodesia. The United States then announced hat President Johnson had or- lercd rejection of a shipment of tons of Rhodesian sugar low in transit from that coun- try. The announcement was made jy U.S. Ambassador Arthur J. Goldberg shortly after the council adopted a resolution toughening its stand against the rebellious white minority re- gime in Rhodesia. Do Utmost The resolution, approved by a vote of 10-0 with only France abstaining, calls on all states "to do their utmost in order to break all economic relations with Southern Rhodesia, includ- ng an embargo on oil and pe- roleum products." A proposal against recog- nizing or aiding the breakaway British colony passed the council by the same vote Nov. 12, the day after the declaration of independence. Goldberg told the council the President acted after Uaming t.hc 1965 Rhodesian sugar quota of about tons was on Its way by sea to the United States. Tlie ambassador earlier had announced suspension of any lilGC (iiinla on sugar imports from Rhodesia. To Continue Goldberg said the United Stales "will continue to consider urgently what other steps we can take to assure that no ac- tion is taken which would assist and encourage the illegal re- gime in Salisbury The council resolution, sub- lilted by Bolivia and Uruguay, ills on Britain to "quell tills >bellion of the racist minori- to take all "appropriate ncasures which would prove effective" to that end, and also to take immediate steps to allow the Rhodesian people to deter- mine their own future. It was a compromise between a British resolution for an arms embargo and an Ivory Coast resolution for use of military force if necessary. It took into account Britain's reluctance to mpose an oil embargo without first studying the consequences ind methods of applying such a step. TOGETHERNESS Four of five newy arrived baby gorillas huddle together upon their arrival at Griffith Park Zoo" n Los Angeles Saturday while spurning an offer of a piece of melon. The fifth, a male, declined to come out of his cage. Dr. W. A. Young, zoo director, said the five animals were obtained from an animal dealer in Holland. They will remain in quarantine for two or three weeks before going on display in the children's zoo section,   

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