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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - June 3, 1964, Yuma, Arizona                             4th Avenue Parking Ban Moves Closer Editor's Notebook The Blank Spot in the Textbooks By JONES OS8ORN Historians at the University of California at Berkeley no- Hced something odd about the history books. They noticed that, in seven different his- tory textbooks widely used in C a li fornia public schools, a distorted view of slav- ery and the N c g r o in America is presented, or else the Ne- gro as a part of American history is not mentioned at all. The historians reported their discovery lo the California De- partment, of Education. Negroes sailed to Hie New World with Balboa in 1513. Negroes fought in Revolution- ary War under George Wash- ington. (Washington at first barred Negroes from Ihe army, until the British began recruit- ing slaves. Alarmed, he then enlisted more than Negro soldiers, and used them in in- teuraied units. Contrary to popular myth, the U.S. had .188.000 free Ne- groes by 1SGO, almost half of them in the South. In Ihe Civil War, more Hian 210.000 Negroes fought in the Union army nnd navy. They won 20 Congressional Medals of Honor. More than made Ihe supreme sacrifice. Yet the California history bonks touch uiJon the Negro lightly, if at all. In one book there is no men- tion r.f slavery in Hie Colonial period. In another, there is not a sin- gle word about Negroes after the Civil War. A iliiid uui..-; nut iiiL-iiliuii Ne- groes in any connection what- soever. The historians iwint out that Hie Icxlbooks are this way be- cause the publishers wanted lo be nbie to sell them to public schools in Ihe South. 10c THE WEATHER HlSC'st yesk'rttay Lowest 71 '1 vmpcriiture :it 11 a.m. today Mi Kcliitive :it 11 a.m. .'iki'.o AvuriiKi; lilKh this date HMI Avenge low llils date 07 KOKKCAST a> Tliursitay nlKlit: Variable liiiili clcnitlipii'ss llltli' clKniKi' In temiiiTuturi' today Thursdyy. Occasional Kiisty aftcinoon soiilluTly winds. HlKli S3, Low Sunrise Sunsi't YUMA 169 18 PASES PER COPY lOc YUMA, ARIZONA, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 1964 PHONE SU 3-3333 ARIZONA 68 Goldwater Beats Rockefeller Sirrine Dispute Livens YUHS Board Meet Baffle Rages Bn Streets SKOl'L. South Korea About jn.OOfl slitdPiiu nnd citi- xens President Chung Heo Park resign fought a w'.lh pi i] ice di- d-iy oil into Ihe night. His shnkrn mar- tial law. Street fighting swirled around capilnl and on Ihc np- proachc.-: I ho presidential pnlare in a day of wild disor- diT. Outb'.v.iks wore reported in other South Korean cities. The dccnr putting the nation under mnrlinl law was an- nounced after Park, who came to power four years ago on the heels of another student uprk- ing, called the National Security Council into urgenl session. PHOENIX Arixona Corporation Commission was oxprelod Indny to sign an order requiring the Southern Pacific Railroad In restore full passen- ger train service across Arixona. The commission Monday lold Ihe railroad to restore separate services of Ibe Golden Slate Limited and Sunset Limited trains immediately, hut Sou- thern Pacific has withheld ac- tion until seeing the order in writing. Bulletin: dall today aaid phase one of a plan to remedy salinity In the water delivered to Mexico, has been completed. :25 additional walla are In use In the Well ton-Mohawk div- ision and tile drainage on acres has been completed to reduce Special Meeting Set Thurs. An audience participation type meeting of Hie Yuma Un- ion High School Board of Edu- cation last night saw yet anoth- er meeting planned to delve into Ibe controversy centering on Supt. Warren R. Sirrine. The crowd, numbering 200, booed, cheered and applauded at various points. They filled most of the seals in Ihe Kofn High cafeteria where Ihe meet- ing was moved lo accommo- date the interesl shown. At the end ol the first half hour, ii had been settled that: 1) A committee" would meet witli Ihe YUHS Dis- Irict Board of Education Thurs- day night; 21 Thai Hie big majority of i those attending Ihe meeling were against Sirrine; j That the board would not I discuss the Sirrine mailer be- fore an open meeting audience that kept interrupting Ihe 'pro- ceedings. At Hie The meeting Thursday night, set for at Ihe hoard room in Yuma School, wii! he closed lo Ihe public. This at the request of the commit- tee asking for the meeling. The Sirrine discussion came up rapidly last night. Mrs. Hcl- cne Thomas Bennett, president of Hie board, called Ihe meet- ing to order and stated that she understood "Hint Mr. I.em- ke has asked lo be Ihc speak- er for Hie group of here." L. A. H'.uili I.emUc mesa citrus grower, prepared sialemenl pages. In it, I.emko "The group wlnrli 1 ani ing for desires to find olll wllal Hie Hoard of Tru-......i is goim: lo do about the recornmcnda- liiins of tin.' l.ii.ie niajorily of Ihe Classroom Teachers Asso- ciation wherein Ihey Ihe replacement of Supt. Sir- rine." l.emke said that ii was his group's Hint HIM nctio-i of the teachers "should he suf- ficient in itself for Ihe Board to terminate Mr. Sirrine's po- sition with Ihe Yuma Union High School District." Kivc Others The speaker listed five olhcr complaints against Sirrine. These included: 1) An alleged demonstrated lack of ability lo administer the public funds while princi- pal at Crane School (at this point Lemkc handed the Ro.-ml a copy of Ihe stale examiner's report on Ibe Crane School Lemkc hinted that there was a sworn sialemenl some- where from Sirrine in connec- tion with Ihe case and Ihnt this i might be made available to Ibe I Board. 2) Adverse statewide publici- ty was irreparably damaging Ihe school system; There bus been severe and adverse effect many stu- dents; Various controversies have demonslraled Sirrine's lack of administrative ability; 5) Controversy has affected Hie possibility of gelling good teachers in Ihe future. At the close of reading Ihe sialemenl, Lemkc asked that his group meet with the Board in a closed session without Sirrine being present. As Lemkc sat down, Mrs. Bennett asked him to name Ihe committee he represented. Lemkc replied, "Myself as chairman, Don McCain nf Ihe Yuma Mesa, Don Soldwcdel of Ihe city, Joe Almar of Ihe cily and Angelo Fellcl of Ihc Yuma Valley." (Today, Soldwedel said that it would be impossi- ble for him lo serve on Ihe committee.) With Ihe audience comment- ing audibly on various remarks, j LIVELY BOARD MEETING A full house- in High cafeteria greeted the YUHS Board of Education at its regular meeting last night. In this picture, Mrs. Holene Thomas Bennett (standing foreground) is reading an article from last night's Yuma Daily Sun. Two hundred interested Yumans were in the audience. Discussion centered around the request of the YUHS District teachers for the board to fire District Superintendent Warren Sirrine (seated lower (Sun Staff City Is Drilling Holes For 'No Parking' Signs Yuma City Street Department, Highway Commissioner Forrest crews this morning began bor-j C. (Frosty) Bradcn. I-'uquay ing boles along 4th Avenue for said he was told Hint the city erection of "No Parking" sign posts. had the responsibility for erect- the signs '1th Avenue Fu- Mulford Winsor, city engi- j and had the right lo do so neer, said signs will 'not said other stale highway erected until after a city ordi- Ihem nance ordering Ihem has been enacted, lie said the ordinance will probably be given first reading at Ihe Council meeling today, and a final reading June 17th. After Hint Ihe ordinance must be published before it be- comes official. Winsor said the crews are merely gelling Ihe posts up in preparation tor mounting of the signs on them. Monday, the Yuma County Board of Supervisors had pro- tested the no parking ban. 1'nitcst Supervisor Jim Fucmay this morning Yuma's BAIT officials told him that an order to the city to erect the no park- ins signs had been delivered to the city June 1st. The same or- der, Fuquay was tnld, set a deadline of June 20th by which time the signs are to be up. "The Board of Supervisors in- tends to stay with their deci- sion to protc-st the Fu- quay said. "We fool very strongly about this. A lot of lit- tle people are going to be caught in the middle of this Ihing. "The county has participated in Ihe Yuma Area Transporfa- (Turn lo Page Col. .'i. please! Barry Now Has 436 of 655 Votes WASHINGTON (AP! Sen. Barry Goldwater increased his total of committed first-ballot voles at the Republican presi- dential nominating convention lo in Tuesday's primary elec- tions. The nomination requires votes. An Associated Press survey of first-ballot votes based on pri- mary commitments, instruc- tions, pledges and stated prefer- ence showed this break down: Goldwater -llifi. Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller US Gov. William W. Scranton 71 Henry Cabot Lodge '14 Son. Margaret Chase Smith 15 Richard M. Nixon 12 Favorite sons 100 Uncommitted 254 UA Pair Kidnapped With Colorado Officer GARDEN CITY, Kan. (AP) rings to the captors who Two University of Arixona stu-1 debated whether lo shoot them dents and a Colorado highway patrolman were kidnapped and released Tuesday by two sus- [iccts in n Colorado jnil break. The suspects, who identified themselves to police as Jess Roberts, and Richard K. Kraus, 36, were arrested here later when they slopped to ask directions lo the nearest liquor store. Hal Kane, assistant Garden City police chief, said the men's car, reported as stolen, was rec- ognized by a passerby from po- lice broadcasts and he turned it to police. Roberts and Kraus gave up without, a struggle. They were on foot near the car when arrested. Kane said one of the men was armed with a revolver. Another revolver was found in the car they had been driving. Howard Marsh, 25, n Colorado state patrolman, was kidnaped by two men and robbed of 5-00, his watch and service revolver earlier Tuesday. He was forced to flag down a passing car which his abductors comman- deered, then released him un- hnrmed, tying him and two college students in the car to a fence post. Driving Ilinnn The two students, Larry MacBean and Jim Grant, both 20, were driving home lo West- field, N.J., from Ihc University of Arizona. Marsh managed lo free him- self and the students nftor the gunmen drove oil. and Marsh. MncBcan and Granl roommates at are Ari- zona. They were en route home fur summer recess. Marsh said alter iiis release "I was scared, mighty scared, but I went along with them IOC per cent." Saw Sticker Marsh said lie stopped castbound panel he noticed an truck because expired blue inspection sticker on the winii- shield. After asking .the two occu- pants for the truck registration (Turn to Page 3, Col. 2 Please) Captures California's 86 Votes By MOHBIB LANDSBKBG SAN FRANCISCO Sen. Barry Goldwaler grabbed a commanding lead for (he GOP presidential nomination today with a stunning California primary victory. Confounding the pollsters wiio had made him the underdog, the Arizona senator came from behind in the vote count to to nose out New York Gov. Nel- son A. Rockefeller for the state's 86 Republican presiden- tial nominating voles. Goldwater's victory had been forecast by the electronic pro- jections of the television net- works. But it took all-night tab- ulations of the actual votes to establish him firmly as the winner. Rockefeller carried most of the California counties in what was a liberal vs. conservative battle. 1st .Major Victory Southern California returns, chiefly from Los Angeles, gave Goldwater his first victory in a major contested primary after losses in New Hampshire and Oregon. This put him near the G55 delegale votes required for the nomination. The Associated Press tabu- lation of returns from of. the state's precincts showed Goldwater Rockefeller Goldwater was getting M.fl per cent of the vole. Most of the network projections had ranged around 51 per cent, a figure on which CBS settled after having predicted general- ly that he would win witli 53 per cent. Oblivious to a short-lived bomb scare, Goldwater took a transcontinental nap as he flew from Los Angeles to Washing- ton. Police hustled a passenger off Goldwater's jet airliner in Los Angeles and made him un- pack a sachel. When no bombs or guns were found in it, air- line officials let him reboard. In high good humor, Goldwa- ter joked with reporters on his arrival in Washington. Alinut Water Alluding to the long dispute between Arizona and California over the waters of the Colora- do River, the Arizona senator cracked: "I have a different at- titude toward Californians now. They can have all the water we Goldwater previously had called his California victory, a "giant step" toward the presi- dential nomination. Salinger Given Promise Of Democratic Support Sheriff Roy Vogt of Littleton, sl Colo., identified Kraus and a Roberts as fugitives from an Arapabo County jnil break Sunday at Littleton. In Wcstfield, N.J., Macbcan's fatiicr said his son telephoned him nnd described his capiors as rougli customers. Young MncBean said he and Grant surrendered their money j By JERRI' KANKIN SAN FRANCISCO (AP) Pie.rre Salinger, hoping to move from Ihe While House lo Capi- tol Hill on California votes, to- day captured a shnrply contest- ed Democratic senatorial nom- ination. The former press secretary for Prcsidenl Kennedy and Johnson was promised a united Democratic support in Novem- ber by the man he edged out, State Controller Alan Cranston, state party leaders. They will aim to smash the political aspirations of former aclor George Murphy, the Ile- publican winner. who bounced into (Turn to Page 3, Col. 5, Please) I GUTTING READY These two street department men are drilling a hole for a 'No Parking' sign post this morning on 41 h Avenue. The city has heen given a deadline of June 26th to get the signs up. Current plans are only lo get the post up ready for mounting, Mulford Winsor, city engineer said. About 100 holes will be drilled. (Sun Staff Inside The Sun Comics ...................................ft Crossword t Editorial I .Movies ..............................X Sports V Women Salinger. the race on the last possible day and couldn't even vole for himself, because he's not a'egi.s- lerrtl in California, rude I" vic- populou.s foro the belated Lns Anscles County resull.s finally started rolling in. Cranston, Salinger and Brown all predicted Ihe parly would close ranks to defeat Republi- can winner George Murphy, the former actor, in November. The portly 39-year-old Salin- ger, whose campaigning on Hie image of the late President Ken- nedy apparently paid off. said he'd be out at 5 a.m. today launching his general election campaign. "There is no one in the slate who wants to go in the direction of George Murphy." he de- clared. Cranston had taken an early lead, but Salinger quickly caught up. The NBC and CBS television networks gave him (he nomination about 9 p.m. Tuesday. Incumhenl Sen. Clair Kngle. who withdrew from the race too i lory on ballots from i Lns Angejes C'ollniy. I Tiie Iniest returns from 30.199 late to erase his name from Ihe of precincts gave Snlin- j ballot, trailed. So did pension ger Cranston advocate George Mcl.ain of Los i HuiiyVil I.U.I Angeles. Engle's wife had en- K.nrlier, was buoyed! dorsed Salinger. 1 by telephoned best wishes from Murphy, 61, beat out S.in j President John.v.n and Mrs. i Francisco financier Lel.md Kai- .John f. Koivnody. T'.ut him! srr former Kansas Gov. to cautiously claim victory be-! Fred Hall.   

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