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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: March 16, 1964 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - March 16, 1964, Yuma, Arizona                             Editor's Notebook An Adequate Hospital Is Yuma's Need 10c THE WEATHER Highest yesterday X3 J-mvost 5S Temperature at II a.m. today Relative humidity at II a.m. Average high tills date "1 AveriiKi' low this dato 6" FORECAST to Tuesday nlgllt: Mostlv clear todav tnrouKh Tues- day, winds northwesterly 10-30 m.'p.h. today with periods of blow- ing dust. Cooler today and tonight. Litttr warmer Tuesday. WKh 75; low 4S. Sunset fiM: sunrise By JONES OSBORN YUMA SUN-VOL. 60-NO. 101 12 PAGES "Docs tile community have adequate hospital This is one of the first ques- tions any prospective new in- dustry or new residents ask when looking over .a town. A jam-packed, overcrowded hos- pital is NOT a g o o U adver- tisement for any commun- ity. Yet that is exactly what Yuma has. Parkview Baptist Hospi- tal is filled to overflow- ing. Patients are frequently placed in the halls and 'that in itseJf is not good. But what is worse is that, in the event of a sudden epidemic or large emergency, we would be found wanting. Human lives hang in the balance in such in- stances. So it is good to see that plans are being made to ex- pand our hospital. Thanks to the foresight of the who built the hospital, it was planned so that it COULD be expanded at a min- imum of cost. That is, the "central services" such as op- erating rooms, delivery rooms, supply, kitchen, et cetera, were built large enough to accom- modate a larger hospital. If a 50-bed wing is added, it will give us a 126-bed hospital. To get the construction funds, bonds will be issued. But the hospital itself will pay off the bonds, by paying a higher rent for the use of the expanded physical plant. Thus the bonds will not fall upon the property owner. The U.S. Congress, intending to help communities care for their sick, long ago passed the Hill-Burton Act. This act of Congress provides federal funds for hospital construction in needed instances. So we should be eligible for that assistance, to further enhance the hospi- tal's ability to pny back the bonds. Bui an adequate, well- equipped hospital is absolutely imperative. No intelligent per- son wants to live in a com- munity with inadequate hospi- tal facilities. Belli Fears Attempt on ife uys DALLAS (API Jack Ruby remained alone in a jail cell 10- day while attorneys pre- pared to appeal the verdict of a Dallas jury which sentenced him to death for murder. "Maximum security" sur- rounds Ruby, Sheriff Bill Deck- er said. But Ruby's attorney, Mclvin Belli, '.said he is worried about a possible attempt on Ruby's life and has asked for extra protection for him. "Later Decker said, "when :he has adjusted the joli of Hie verdict, he probably will be put in a large cell with other -prisoners. He's had maxi- mum security from the begin- ning and he will continue to have it in jail." Dallas authorities refused to "dignity by comment" a state- ment Belli has made several times since Ruby was convict- ed Saturday morning of killing Lee Harvey Oswald, accused assassin of President Kennedy. The attorney said: "Ruby is worried, find sn am I. that they may slip someone into his another prisoner -with a shiv (knife) in ordei to preveni our appeal. TliPn Ihey would make it appear is (Turn to Page 7, Col. -I Please) PER COPY lOc YUMA, ARIZONA, MONDAY, MARCH 16, 1964 PHONE SU 3-3333 ARIZONA 308 Bulletin: approval to a bill to extend f l-_ V J.' J. i> O A O J J. valuation dead- line to February of 1966. The vote was 42-30, just one acre than noeasSary Rail Unions Ready To Strike Johnson Pledges Power of U.S. to OAS Will Help Any State In Danger WASHINGTON dent Johnson pledged today "the full power of the United States" to help any American country whose freedom is threatened by forces directed from outside me continent. The President delivered this assurance in his first full-scale address on inter-American af- fairs and the Alliance for Progress. What he said in commiting the United States to help any other American nation whose freedom is endangered by out- side pressure was not new in itself. The late President John F. Kennedy had spoken in sim- ilar terms. But, once again on a specific issue, Johnson was picking up the banner of the man he succeeded. Similarly, lie rcdedicated the United Slates to partnership with Latin America in the Al- liance for Progress. In doing so, he put heavy emphasis on in- creased cooperation, self-help and social justice. "The barriers are Johnson said. "The enemies of freedom seek to harass us at every turn. "We sre engaged in a strug- gle for 'the destiny of the Amer- ican IVpUbiiua." At Pan-Am Union Johnson spoke at the Pan American Union, where Carlos Sanz dc Santamaria of Colom- bia was installed as the first chairman of a new Inter-Amer- ican Committee for the Alli- ance for Progress. Tiie President noted that 31 years ago this month Franklin D. Roosevelt proclaimed the good neighbor policy for the Americas, and three years ago this month John F. Kennedy called for the Alliance for Prog- (Turn to Page 7, Col. G Plea-se) Transient Dees in Fall from Train TO HIGHWAY POST: Braden Oka By Committee yed WAR'S GRIM STRUGGLE A small boy struggles to help his mother wrench free from grip of a South Vietnamese soldier as she tries to run after her hus- band. The husband was taken prisoner Saturday by raiding Viet Nam forces. He was one of 300 captured and accused of being members of the communist Viet Cong guerrilla forces. (AP Wirephoto) PHOENIX C. Braden of Yuma, was unani- mously approved today as a member of the State 'Highway Commission by the Senate High- ways and Bridges Committee. The action paves the way for confirmation by the entire Senate. Braden was appointed by Paul Fannin to succeed Wilbur Asbury, outgoing commissioner. The appointment is for five years, ending Jan. II, 13GD. Confirmafion action was held up for a time because of a dis- agreement between the gover- nor and some senators on a Game and Fish Commission posl. The Highways and Bridges Committee was the same group last week that postponed delib- eration on the Bradon appoint- ment giving indication that Gov. Fannin's appointment would be stalled. But the urg- ing of Yuma County senators and Asbury himself changed the situation and Sen. Robert Morrow, D-Mohiwc, culled this morning's session. There was no indication as to what went on in the hearing. It is believed that the full Senate will give confirmation to the Braden appointment before the end of the current session which is already in overtime. Braden is a Republican and would serve a five-year term on the Highway Commission. Maricopa mid Yuma Counties alternate men on the Commis- sion. The disagreement on the Game and Fish post was re- .suivod Guv. Fijnnia with- drew the name of Marcel For- niiin of Yuma for re-appoint- ment to the Commission. This was forced by Morrow and oth- er northern senators. After apparently from a train late tumbling Saturday night a transient from Wyom- ing died as a result of injuries. The body of the man, Ken- neth Lee Seeburg, was not dis- covered until Sunday morning. The man was found by several Yuma persons shortly aflcr 10 a.m. Sunday one mile east of the east railroad yards. Officers of the Yuma Counly Sheriff's Department said that See-burg had been killed earlier and that they had no facts on the exact circumstances sur- rounding the death. The body is at Johnson Mort- uary. Seeburg, whose age is un- determined, listed his last ad- dress as 1713 Bleistinn Avenue, Cody, Wyo. I Million May Greet De Gaulle MEXICO CITY mil- lion Mexicans were axpected to turn out today in an enthusiastic welcome for President Charles -de Gaulle as he begins a cam- paign to increase French influ- uiiut: in L.iliii Aiuonoa. De Gaulle was to arrive in the Mexican cnpilal in a French Air Force jet early in the aft- ernoon after a quick change of planes at the Yucatan peninsula city of Merida, 635 miles east of Mexico City. The French president and his wife spent the night on the French Caribbean island of Gu- adeloupe after a nine-hour trans- atlantic flight from Paris aboard a U.S.-built Air France Boeing 707 jetliner. De Gaulle will spend four days in Mexico in an effort to boost French prestige and trade as a prelude to visits to Argen- tina, Bra7.il, Peru and Uruguay this fall. He is the first French president to visit Latin Ameri- ca. Latin-American Communists are reported exploiting the vis- it by stressing De Gaulle's dif- ferences with the United States, particularly his pursuit of an independent foreign policy. Congress Gets Orders For War on Poverty armors Nursing Home Low Bid After an hour and a half exe-[ Bauer of La Mesa, Calif, at S10J entivp session this morninir, the Yuma County Supervisors ac- cepted the low bid of an El Centra group to construct a new Yuma County Nursing Home. The bid was for S3 per pa-j tient per day with 6U patieni.s guaranteed. Bidders wore Dr. Burke Schoensee and Dr. Paul Campbell who operate a nurs- ing home in Kl Centra The Board. He By W.B. KAGSDALE JR. WASHINGTON (AP) dent Johnson gave Congress marching orders today for the war on poverty, concentrating his attack on help- ing needy young Americans. Tile program to help young- sters in the 16 to 20 age brack- et centers on a job corps remi- niscent of Ihe Civilian Conser- vation Corps of the "The years of high school and college age are the most critical stage of a young per- son's Johnson said, in a special message on poverty. "If they are not helped then, many will be condemned to a life of poverty which they, in turn, will pass nn to their chil- dren." The job corps would enlist up i to young men, draft re- jects and school dropouts, from "those whose background, health and education makes them least fit for useful work." These young men would be removed from their slum back- grounds and placed in camps lo work on consercation projects and in special job training cen- lers for a blend of training, basic education and work ex- pericnce. I 1 Work Training Other phases of the youth program are work-training and work-study projects, federal grants to provide full or part time jobs to help youngsters stay in high school, take voca- tional training or work their! way through college. Coordinating the war on pov- per patient por day. Ho wm a ncw bid 25 cent.s on nursing agency, the Office nf Economic Third bid was that of Val-j Opportunities, which Johnson said would be headed by Sar- gent Shriver, "my personal work in various phases of the war on poverty. Both the Job Corps and the Volunteers for America are taken from legislation now pending in Congress the Youth Conservation Corps and the National Service Corps re- spectively. phases of Ihe war on asked by Johnson in- Kennedy Books Are Shipment uf thn Associated Press Kennedy m c tn o r i u 1 hunks, "The T o r h Is 1ms licun doliiyod en route here from Now York. The Viimii Dully Sun will fill Us several hundred out- standing ardors us sunn as tho shipment arrives. Some 100 or the books have already lte.cn delivered here. Other poverty eluded: program of grants of up to 90 per cent for urban and rural community action pro- grams, where local plans were drafted to utilize all available community resources, public (Turn to Page 7, Col. 3 Please) Plan Autopsy In Fall Death TUCSON (AP) -A autopsy is to be performed al Tucson Med- ical Center on Michael O'Connor, 17, of Tucson, who died today of injuries suf- fered in a fall down a cliff. The youth was in critical con- dition when taken to Tucson General Hospital early Sunday. His injuries were described as a collapsed lung, an apparent skull fracture and abrasions. LT. GEORGE NEALE Blue Angel Dies When Chute Fails plies. ley House of Tucson. It was for S12.75 per patient per day. Dr. Schoensee told the Board that hi.s qualifications were well known and thai the record of his 18 years of operation in Kl Cenlro was on file with tho said liiai iii.s Yuma tient per day for plies. nursing sup- (hat in Kl Attorney Cent.ro. Tom Choules chief of staff for 'he war aeainst poverty." In addition to the Job Corps. Shriver also will supervise cre- ation of another ncw group, the for America. a i Peace Corps-styled body nf Oflfl tn 5.000 volunteers who will It was the second attempt by I Yuma .spoke tor Bauer. He pro-1 the bill now (toes to the Senate jfor the Superviosrs to resolve placing of the nursing care for indigent patients in private hands. The first ended in rhrow- Ine nut received. Vote today was unanimous. T ii i .s morning -hero liiiT-o 1-ids Tho Cenlrn bid l.-vw an.-l sontod a breakdown on costs and noted that Bauer's plans wore already approved by the Sfato Health Department. Hcj stated that failure nf Dr. Seho-i i en.see to have his pians com-i reipieted in a (lei.iy. Ch'Miioy questioner! the. ____. Inside The Sun Business APALACHICOLA, Fla. (AP) George N. Neale, 29 ,one of the Navy's Blue Angel pie- cision pilots, plunged to his death Sunday when his para- chute failed lo open fully after he ejected from his crippled jet. A Navy spokesman said the flight demonstration team was returning to its base at Pensa- coln, Fla., from nn show at West Palm Beach when Nealc's plane "experienced some sort of mechanical failure" west of 1 Apalaohicola. Ili7 miles easl of Ponsaoola. W.I I. Meadows and his son, Billy, said they heard a popping 'noise a backfire before 'the jet fighter hit 200 yards from their home. Meadows said Ihe pilot ejected at about 150 lo 1200 feet-too low for his 'chute 1 lo open fully. SP Listed As Target Of Threat WASHINGTON (AP) Chief railroad negotiator J.F.'. Wolfe said today the country is on "the verge or a national rail- road strike." Wolfe said fivc railroad un- ions created the new strike threat by bypassing national negotiations and seeking sepa- rate talks with two individual railroads. "We have unimpeachable ad- vice that the unions do intend to strike Wednesday" against the two railroads, Wolfe said at a news conference. Wolfe released a copy of a letter the railroad negotiators delivered to Secretary of La- bor W. Williard Wirtz Sunday. "We respectfully ask that you move promptly to prevent the from turning private disputes into public the letter said. Labor Department observ- er at Wolfe's press conference said there would be no immed- iate comment from Wirlz. said that if the unions carry out plans to strike the Southern Pacific or the Louis- ville Nashville, the other railroads will immediately im- pose wage and other work rules changes across the nation. Union sources have said this would bring about a nation- wide strike. To Court Tiie railroads will go into court in an attempt to halt any union move to strike the two individual railroads, W o It e said. If this the work rules changes would be posied with- in twvnty'ioui' hours on all major railroads, he added. Wolfe said the railroads had what they considered a hind- ing agreement with the unions that the negotiations would be handled on a national, rather than a local, basis. The new strike threat arises out of issues which Congress left to joint negotiations when it passed emergency legislation last August, to halt a nation- wide strike threat then. Congress aleo ordered com- pulsory arbitration on some is- sues which could eventually eliminate thousands of union The uninn has appealed against the arbitration ruling to the Supreme Court. Refuse to Hurgaitt The unions have accused the railroads of deliberately refus- ing to bargain in the national talks in an effort to force the dispute back to Congress and obtain more legislation for compulsory arbitration. The unions reportedly ap- proached the two railroads for in an effort to stalled national separate talks get around the negotiations. The five unions involved are the Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, the Railroad Train- men, the Switchmen's all AFL-CIO and two independ- ent unions, the Locomotive En- gineers and the Order of Con- ductors and Brakemen. Hildreth Resigns as Welfare Commissioner PHOENIX (API Welfare i Commissioner Fen Hildreth today announced that he is re- signing, elfrctive April 15. .............iiitii Hildreth he waild request! lion reinstatement tn former nn- bonrd's meeting this Fiiiiuy member Robert Bohannan Jr. ot Phoenix. Board Chairman James Cam- eron.-. i.if Yuma said the the tive services, a post subordinate to the commissioner. Hildrolh. 51, with the Welfare Department for 25 years, has been commissioner for nearly j seven years. He said lie accepted (ho top I job by request of the Siaie Woi- faro Board on condition thai il i was tho 'no.ird's unanimous do- sire ami thai lie lie granted an official leave of absrncr dreth has performed. I found Mr. Hiklrelh a very easy person Itn work with and 1 h.-.ppy he iwill be remaining with the de- liartment so that his past knovv- j ledge will be retained." lliMrelh iiuui over himself adding. "In my opinion, the Crossword...... Harris Survey ios Sjxtrts Women I lowed by of William J.( tTurn 'o 7, Coi. 7 FAIR CONTESTANT Kofa senior Sandra Mont- gomery, 17, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Mont- gomery, Hi. Box 2G6, will give a r'i't-stTii.aiitjn ns her Inlent entry in the Miss Yuma County contest. Sandra, one of ihe JO girls soekinc: (he title at the fair April is sponsored by the Yuma Rotary Ciuli. (Sun Staff Photo) his career position iiniior Ibe merit system. In a statement today, he said those conditions no loncer exist. iMdro'h said the board h.i.l indicated that it would be ur.- nhsonco, action has borr. In olds interests of the Imard and de- partment will be best served at this time if I gave up the "I feel the department has served the riti7cns of (ho state well during my tenure if due tn a group of loyal and dedi- cated omni.iyos this is vt, r .mi sure they uil] all rontinuo to I intend .'n do."   

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