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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: July 3, 1963 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - July 3, 1963, Yuma, Arizona                             Have a Happy Bell-Ringing 4th of July EDITOR'S NOTEBOOK The Giants Of Industry Grow Bigger By JONES OSBORN Fortune magazine provides us with an interesting report on the condition of big business in the U.S.A. Both sales and profits of Amer- ica's 500 biggest industrial com- panies sc't an all-time high in 1962, according to Fortune. The combined sales 1 of the 500 giants were bil- lions, or per cent above the previous year which also set an all-time rec- ord. Combined I profits for thr 500 Jast year came to 313V4 billions, a gain of 16 per cent over profits of the previous year. These 500 firms account for more than one-half of the total sales of all U.S. manufacturing and mining companies. And they account for more than 70 per cent of their profits. Forty-nine American companies now have sales of more than ?1 billion a year, an increase of 8 over the previous year. The ten biggest industrial com- panies, and their total 19G2 sales (in billions) are as follows: 1) General Motors 2) Standard Oil N.J. ..._. 9.5 3) Ford Motor 8.1 4) General Electric 1.8 5) Socony Mobil OH ___ 3.9 6) U.S. Steel 3.5. 7) Texaco ...................___ 3.3 8) Gulf Oil 3.8 9) Western Electric ___ 2.8 Swift 2.5 This is not, of course, the full story of American economic health.. Thousands upon thousands of small businesses, also play a vital role in the nation's economy. But it is more exciting, Fortune knows, to talk about the giants of American industry. _ Council Predicts Record Holiday Traffic Toll By United Press International Americans prepared today to celebrate the Fourth of July, with the grim prediction that 550 to 650 persons will die during the long weekend. The National Safety Council said the estimated 550 to 650 deaths would be a record high for the Independence Day week- end. An additional lo persons would be injured, the council predicted. Tbe 102-hour holiday begins at 6 p.m. local time and continues until midnight Sunday. Howard Pyle, council president, said nearly three-fourths of all traffic accidents would be caused by drinking and driving, driving too fast, driving left of center, and failure to yield right-of-way. The Weather Bureau said sunny skies were expected on the Fourth in the eastern half of the nation and fair to partly cloudy skies elsewhere. Tt will be warm in almost all sections. RFK Defends Rights Measure WASHINGTON (UPI) Atty. Gen. Robert F. Kennedy today sharply rejected suggestions that the public accommodations ,sec- tion of the President's civil rights proposals would put new shackles on the nation's business. Ilk. called the suggestions "smoke- screens." Kennedy made the statement shortly before he completed three days of testimony on the public accommodations plan. T Bulletin: ISi' a f or. 'j of 2 claltnad, s ieimploy.eo -end his wifie '.had -diploma t- U.S. eontands thej Ing tiiemb er a: survelllan- 10c AND THE WEATHER Itliilicst yesterday 108 Lowest 77 at 11 n.ni. today 93 Relative humidity at 1L a.m. 41% Avcrutio hlnh this date 108 Avenge low this date 79 FORECAST to Thursday: Mostly clear with little change In tem- iieriiturc today through Thursday. HlKlier humluUv today and tonight. Hlph 108. law '76. Sunrise Sun- set YUMA 157 14 PAGES PER COPY lOc YUMA, ARIZONA, WEDNESDAY, JULY 3, 1963 PHONE SU 3-3333 ARIZONA 157 Reds Step Up Spying Activities Iraq Claims Communist Revolt Plot Foiled Attempted Army Camp Coup Fails BEIRUT, Lebanon (UPI) Baghdad Radio today announced the crushing of a Communist plot to seize a military camp in Iraq. The radio, in a broadcast heard here, announced a communique from the Iraqi Revolutionary Com- mand saying the plot against the camp at Rashid this morning was put down in hall an hour. The broadcast gave no details of the action and did not mention what, .if-any, casualties were suf- fered. "A Communist plot staged by some Communists and agents to seize Rashid camp was crushed at dawn in a half hour by our military forces, the national guard, the police and the a com- munique from the Iraqi revolution- ary government said. Strength Shown The swiftness with which the at- tempted coup at the camp was foiled showed how strongly "the revolutionary regime is in con- trol, the broadcast said. The communique said that a special committee was questioning the "detained agents." A 'later broadcast reported the execution by hanging of three accused of partici- pating in a revolt in Mosul, in northern Iraq, in The Iraqi revolutionaiy govern- ment, which came to power last Feb. 8 in a military coup, report- edly has been conducting a cam- paign to eliminate Communists in Iraq. The Reds backed former Premier Abdel Karim Kassem, who was ousted in the coup and later executed. Lenders Pro-Nasser The February uprising under the leadership of a six-man junta was led by Lt. Col. Abdul Karim Mustafa. The junta named a "transitional" government with Abdul Salam Mohammed Arif as president and Maj. Gen. Ahmed ITassen el-Bakr as premier. The leaders of the coup were said to be advocates of pan- Arab policies promoted by United Arab Republic President Gamal Abdel Nasser. Red China Accuses Kremlin MOSCOW (UPI) Communist China circulated a Foreign Min- istry note in Moscow today ac- cusing the Kremlin oE trying to obstruct Sino-Soviet negotiations scheduled to start here Tbe Chinese Embassy distrib- uted copies of the note to the embassies in Moscow of countries with whom Peking has diplomatic relations. The note, which was released earlier in Peking, dealt with the Soviet expulsion of three Chinese diplomats and two students for circulating in Moscow a harsh at- tack on Russian policy. Colls Action "Unfounded" Calling the Soviet action "un- tenable and the Chi- nese note accused the Soviet Un- ion of deliberately trying to worsen relations between the two countries virtually on the eve of the Moscow talks aimed at heal- ing their ideological and political split. Until how the Kremlin Has said nothing about the expulsion of the Chinese, leaving the an- nouncement to Peking. Diplomatic observers said dis- tribution of the note by the Chi- nese under the nose of the Krem- lin was certain to cloud the at- mosphere for the talks. Not Bucking Down The Soviet Union indirectly served notice today it will not hack down -in the face of Peking's belligerent line toward other Communist countries and the West. Premier Nikita Khrushchev was reported to have congratu- lated Marshal Tilo upon his re- cent confirmation lo the presi- dency of Yugoslavia. One of the basic conflicts in the Sino-Soviet rill is the Chinese demand that Russia break with Yugoslavia, which Peking ac- cuses of "consorting with the im- perialists" and betraying the in- ternational Communist move- ment. No Paper Tomorrow The office of The Yuma Daily Sun will he closed tomorrow in observance of Independence Diiy and there will he no issue of this newspaper on tliut day. Paul Nockels, Attorney Dies Here Last Night Paul F. Nock-els, 50, Yuma at- torney, died suddenly here last night at Parkview Baptist Hospi- tal. The well-known attorney, a member of the firm of Nebeker, Nebeker and Nockels, was taken ill at home .late last' night. He was taken to Parkview where he died within an hour. It is believed that lie died of a vascular rup- ture. For a number of years, Nockels operated the Yuma Adjustment Bureau. In February of this year, he returned to the practice of law. He received his law degree from Creighton University in 1936. He attended Notre Dame University for two years. At one time, Nock- els was associated with Everett Miller in the practice of law here. During WWII, he was in the Counter Intelligence Corps. Survivors include his wife, Ruth, and four children, Danny, 14; Elaine, 13; Frank, 10; and Cathy, 8, all of 14-15 8th Avenue. Also surviving are a brother, Frank, and two sisters. The broth- er is expected to arrive here this evening. Funeral arrangements are pending. Nockels was a member of the PAUL NOCKELS Arizona Bar, Yuma County Bar Association and the Nebraska Bar. He also was a member of (he Yuma Elks Lodge, American Legion and VFW. His wife is the school nurse at Kofa High. SaCTk.' LET FREEDOM vYumans are urged to join with millions of other'Americans tomorrow at 11. a.m. in celebrating Independence Day by. ringing a bell. Thomas F. Allt and Lt. Cmdr. Jack Larson, repre- Yumans Plan Holiday Celebrations Bell ringing nnd fireworks arc the orders of the dny in Yuma and surrounding areas on Inde- pendence Day, tomorrow. The nation-wide Bells for Free- dom program will be a highlight in many communities. Many Yuma organizations and churches will take part in the 11 a.m. bell- ringing to note Uie sound of free- dom. The sounds should peel across the town as -Yumans take time out from their holiday to remember its significance. Alarms Ton? Somerton is planning to take part in the celebration by sound- ing the old air-raid siren at 11 a.m., tomorrow, Somerton Baptist Church and the Immaculate Heart of Mary Church will ring their bells at the appointed hour. Some merchants .have even discussed of setting off.their burg- lar-alarms to enhance the audible rededicalion of the principle of liberty. Here in Yuma, fireworks dis- plays will be set off tonight and tomorrow night. The Crest Drive-In Theater will hold its annual fireworks display, tonight at Crest 'holds ils display tonight so as not to com- pete with the American Legion celebration tomorrow night. This is tlie fourth year in a row for the Crest entertainment, and a crowd of nearly is expected. Watermelons All the kids from the Yuma area arc invited to cat Iheir fill of watermelons starting at noon, tomorrow, at the Jaycce club- house. Over 600 watermelons will bo passed out as part of the July 4th Community Carnival. Tomorrow night will feature the American Legion barbecue. The H. H. Donkcrslcy Post No. will its festivities at the Jaycce clubhouse starling with the barbe- cue at 5 p.m. The general 'public is invited. There will be supervised games for the children, a scramble for pennies, and train rides for tile children. The Fireworks After dark a beautiful fireworks demonstration featuring ground (Turn lo Page 12, Col. 3, Please) senling the Colo-Gila Kiwanis Club, one oJ: the.many clubs in the Yuma. area fostering the July .4th bell pealing, prac- tice up for tomorrow's freedom ring. The bell belongs to Yuma High School. BIG pretty young lady, Sharon McGinnis, 114 2] si: Street, is holding two of the fireworks displays to be set off tomorrow night by the American Legion at the Jaycee clubhouse. All Yumans are invited to attend. (Sun Staff Photo) Wirtz Seeks To Avert Rail Strike WASHINGTON (UPI) Labor Secretary W. Willard Wirtz stepped into deadlocked railroad negotiations again today in tope of finding some avenue toward averting a nationwide strike. Wirlz put himself back into the struggle Tuesday with the an- nouncement that a new round of talks had gone nowhere. The strike deadline, extended twice, is July 10. "We arc now in the 17lh hour of this dispute which has contin- ued for nearly four he said. "No effective bargaining has taken place, as a result we are facing a nationwide railroad shutdown.' He planned to meet with J. E. Wolfe, chairman of the railroad negotiating committee, and each of the negotiators for the five op- erating railroad brotherhoods. Friday he planned a meeting will) both sides in a joint session. Please Drive Carefully, Yuma Officers Urge All Yuma law enforcement chiefs joined today in urging mot crisis to drive with extra cau- tion over the holiday tomorrow. Yuma Police Chief Robert Ma- bery said that all available offi- cers will be in patrol cars through- out the city tomorrow keeping traffic moving safely. He said there i.s expected lo be a heavy traffic flow of tourists nnd holi- day motorists through the city and lo this area for recreation purposes. Chief Mabery said officers will keep a constant check to keep traffic moving safely. Yumn County Sheriff Travis Yancey said his staff will also he out in full force patrolling the county roads and highways. He suggested that motorists should try 'to keep a, safe distance behind the car in front, drive at a safe speed and refrain from drinking if driving. Arizona Highway Patrolmen will also he doing extra duty on the .state highways, according to Sgt. C. M. (Chick) Lawwill, of the pa- trol staff here. He said pntrolmcn would concentrate on slowing up speeders and getting drunk driv- ers off the highways. NAACP Demands Hotel Remove Negro Statues CHICAGO (UPI) The na- tional Association for the Ad- vancement of Colored People (N'AACPI demanded today that two statues of Negro jockeys be removed from the lobby of its hotel headquarters. Delegates to the NAACP's 54th annual convention passed an emergency resolution objecting to the presence of the five-foot fig- urines in front of the entrance to the ".Tockey Club" in the Jlorri- son Hotel. Soviet Files Protest over U.S. Arrests WASHINGTON So- Union today protested the ar- of a Russian U.N. ein- )loye and his wife on spy charges and demanded their immediate The protest was filed at the State Department by Georgi Kor- nienko, acting head of the Soviet 2mbassy here. Mentioned in the protest were Van Dmitriovlch Kgorov, 41, and iis wife Alexandria. 39. They vere picked up 'along with an- other couple Tuesday night on charges that they conspired over he past six years to steal U.S. military secrets for the Kremlin. Kornienko called the arrest 'unlawful" and said it "cannot mprove in any way American- ioviet relations." KFK Comments Meanwhile, Ally. Gen. Robert r. Kennedy, commenting on the arrests, said that the Communists vere stepping up their spy activi- ies against the United Stales. The four were arrested Tues- lay night by FBI agents in New York's Queen County and i n tVashington in the second Soviet spy case in this country in two days. On Monday the Stale De- partment ordered expulsion of So- viet Embassy attache Gennadiy Sevastynov -for espionage. A government official called the spy ring "n big one" and ihe FBI said it had all the tradition- al messages left at "drop codes, ciphers and secret, writings. Two Aro Kennedy said today on a televi- sion program that the two arrest- ed in Washington were not Amer- can citizens but were "illegals." He appeared on NBC's Today's program. The attorney general described his term as applying to persons vho came to the United Slates not as part of u diplomatic mission, >ut illegally and who adopted the dcntily of American citizens. Kennedy said "this kind of ac- tivity" is increasing against the United States. He said "All Com- munist countries" have increased .heir espionage activity. Seized in Now York in the lat- est roundup were Ivan Dmitrie- vicn Egorov, 'II, and his wife, Alexsandria, 39. Kgorov, a per- sonnel officer in the United Na- tions secretarial, formerly served In Soviet Embassy posls in India and Canada. Taken into custody In Washing- ton was a couple known as Rob- ert Kctetutis Ballch and Joy Ann Gnrber Ballch. The FBI said iheso were not their real names, but it did not disclose their true identities. It said the real Baltch is a Roman Catholic priest and Joy Ann Garber is a Norwalk, Conn., housewife. Neither knew of the spy masquerade. Two Others FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover said that two other conspirators in Ihe spy ring were Aleksei Ivanovich Calkin, -15, former first secretary of (he Byelorussian U.N. mission, who left the United States May 10, and Pctr Egoro- vich Maslennikov, -13, first secre- tary of the Soviet U.N. mission who returned home a week ear- lier. The FBI complaint Identified Galkin and Mnslcnnikov as offi- cers of Soviet military intelli- gence. It said that the defendants con- spired to transmit to Russia "in- formation relating lo the national defense of the United States, and particularly information relating to military installations, naval in- stallations, troop movements, shipyards and military waterfront facilities." Among the information report- ed sought was the locution of U.S. intercontinental ballistic missile sites. Stores To Be Closed On Independence Day Public offices mid stores will bo (-Insert tomorrow in observ- ance of Indcpemlcnen Dny, a le- gal holiday.   

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