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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: October 10, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - October 10, 1962, Yuma, Arizona                             U.S. Denies Red Charge Of Spying MOSCOW (UPI) The United States today "categorically" re- jected spy allegations against oust- ed U.S. assistant naval attache L. Cmdr. Raymond Smith, 41, and "vigorously" protested "manifold violations" by Soviet authorities of his diplomatic immunity. The U.S. move was made in a note delivered today to the for- eign Ministry. The U.S. note said the American Embassy here "categorically re- jects all allegations of impropei behavior on the part of Command- er Smith and specifically that he was engaged in espionage." "The embassy vigorously pro- tests the manifold violations bj Soviet authorities of the rights and immunities appertaining to Commander Smith as a duly ac- credited diplomatic officer of the embassy." The note charged Smith, ex- pelled from the Soviet Union Mon- day on espionage charges, was "physically assaulted and forcibly deprived of. item.-; of personal prop- erty by allegedly nonofficial Soviet "During this period of illegal de- tention he was refused permission to communicate with the embassy and was subjected to threats of violence." it said. The note chained Soviet militia men (police) refused to honor bis diplomatic card. And it said the United States expected the Soviet the necessary disciplinary meas- ures" so as "to assure tiiat there will be no recurrence of violation of the diplomatic immunities of members of the embassy staff." Embassy sources said Smith's expulsion from the Soviet Union appeared a clear case of retalia- tion for the expulsion by the Unit- ed States of two members of the Soviet Union mission to the Unit- ad Nations. The ousted Soviets were Yev- geny M. Prokhorov and Ivan Y. Vydrodov. The United States charged they had hern buying U.S. defense secrets from Sailor Nel- son C. Drummond, 33. Drummond has pleaded innocent. Smith was to have sus- tained a bruise on the left shoul- der and to have been scratched. 10c THE WEATHER Highest yesterday %1 Lowest tilts morning 53 Temperature at 11 a.m. today, S4 Relative humidity at 11 a.m. 4S Average hlKh this date 93 Average I-rx tnis date 65 KORKCAST to Thursday: Clear, with little change In tem- perature today through Thrusiay. Hliih 97. Low 6'.'. Sunrise: Sunset: YUMA 240 16 PAGES PER COPY lOc YUMA, ARIZONA, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1962 PHONE SU 3-3333 ARIZONA 240 Shot Will Miss Venus Miles WASHINGTON (UPI) Scien- tists disclosed today that the Mariner II Venus probe will miss the bright planet by miles instead of 9.000 miles as previous- ly estimated. The scientists told a news con- ference, however, that the wider miss will not spoil the scientific value instruments designed to study the atmosphere and surface of Venus. As the trajectory is now calcu- lated, the scientists said, the -147- pound spacecraft will pass "well wilhin the region where the sci- entific planetary experiments are expected lo he very effective." After Mariner U was launched Aug. 27 il embarked on a course that would have carried it miles away from Venus if its path had not been corrected. On Sepi. nine days after launch, a course changing rocket aboard the craft was fired by ra- dio command from the earth. At first the scientists thrnnght course change would carry Mariner II to a point about miles from Venus Dec. 14 after a 109-day flight of ISO.2 million miles. More precise tracking in the days since then, however, dis- closed that the mulcourse rocket had added two miles an hour too much to the craft's velocity. The cause of this overcorrection is not know. Anti-Red Author On KIVA Tonight Clcon Skotiscn. noted anil-com- munist author, will be co-spon- sored by the Yuma County and El Ceniro Freedom Forums on tv tonight. Skousen will be seen over KIVA from 7 to tonight The lec- turer is a militant and author of "The Naked Com- munist." a factual book dealing with every aspect of the commu- nist conspiracy. He is a former FBI agent, lawyer and university professor. Bulletin: telephone told the Baltimore News cbt today he plahn-f "ed to shoot Presl- Jlent Kennedy ton- 'Ight during t It hare. The cret Service said security Jthrett vtift; ptes- was to be Itj Yanks Win 5th Series Game, 5-3 Demo Leaders Prod Congress into Faster Action Clear Way For Public Works Bill Kennedy Signs Drug Control Bill into Law WASHINGTON (UPI I Presi- WASHINGTON (UPI) Demo- cratic leaders, having trouble i keeping enough lawmakers hand to transact business, man-i aged today for the first time this week to prod a dawdling Con- gress into faster action. The House approved a speed- up procedure which cleared the way for immediate negotiations to resolve a Senate House dispute over terms of a "pork barrel" public worte bill. Compromise agreement on the multibillion dollar measure is one of the chief roadblock to final adjournment of the first Kennedy Congress. It already is the longest election-year session since World War II. SATURDAY HOUSE DEADLINE House leaders had indicated earlier they had little hope of getting out before Saturday. Sen- ate Democratic Leader Mike -Mansfield, who had set Thursday night as a target, urged all Sen- ators still in town to stay here. Officials of both houses ad- mitted that the Agriculture De- partment money deadlock was the main block to long-awaited congressional adjournment. Meantime, the nation's doctors, lawyers and other self-employed persons watched the White House for President Kennedy's action, if any, on a bill to let them set up tax deductible private pension funds. Congress finally passed the hill this year after 11 years of effort by its backers. The decision on the pension bill was a top issue as Congress flushed for adjournment by the end of the week. But deadlocks on an agricultural appropriations measure and a public works bill still had to be resolved. The House was set to stamp final approval today on an appro- priations bill including S100 mil- lion that Kennedy asked for pur- chase of Nniled Nations bonds. The purchase was authorized in a bill passed earlier. The Senate Foreign Relations Committee called a closed meet- ing to consider a House passed resolution backing up the Presi- dent in a firm stand on Berlin. Approval was expected. Any hope that Kennedy might lave had for killing the pension bill with a ixjcket veto after Con- gress quit vanished when the law- makers last week halted their ad- journment rush and settled down to wait for tonight's deadline on the bill. City Nominating Petition Deadline Is 5 p.m. Today Deadline for filing nomination apers is 5 p.m. today. City corder Limvood Perkins warned today. Papers must have a minimum of 116 signatures or a maximum of 192 and must be filed in his office by 5 p.m. City primary elec- tion is Oct. 30th. Yuma City Coun- cil will meet in special session at 2 p.m. tomorrow to certify the nominations. A) Minerva added his name to the list filing for City Council seats. He filed yesterday. Others who have filed include John Peach and Odell Fletcher, seeking re-election to the Council, Frank Bronski, Robert Kennerly, Walter Duncan, Charles Cochran, Fcrdy Sant, Charles Harrell, Hen- ry Gonzales and Herb Angle, all [or Council; and George Shackle- ford. seeking re-election as may- or, Thomas AIM. Dennis MeKeogh, Joe Atmar and Jerry Binkley, for mayor. dent Kennedy today signed into j law a bill to tighten government spec! the operations and records. of drug firms more thoroughly; than in the past. control over drugs. Among those Drug advertisements would! who watched the signing was Dr. have to carry at least a sum- Frances Kelsey. niary of any possible harmful side Dr. a Food and Drug j effects, and generic or official Administration scientist, indirectly i names would be printed more played a major role in congres-1 prominently on labels, sional passage of the legislation because of her suspicions about the effects of the diug Thalido- j mide. She refused to clear the drug, thus helping lo keep ii off the market in this country. This j averted a possible repetition here j of thousands ot deformities which swept Europe among women who took the drug during early preg- nancy. Following the Thalidomide Congress resurrected pre- viously discarded provisions of the administration drug control bill. At the bill signing ceremony, Kennedy paid tribute to Sen. Es- tes Kefauver, D-Tenn., principal congressional advocate of tougher drug controls. The President gave Kefauver the first pen he used to sign the bill. Kennedy gave one of the other pens to Dr. Kelsey. The President said he was glad to approve legislation to permit consumers "to buy safer and more effective drugs." He said the bill "is a major step forward in giving protection to the Ameri- can The bill, rushed through Con- gress in the wake of the Thalido- mide scare, would allow the FDA to suspend use of any drug it feels posed an immediate health hazard. Manufacturers would be re- quired to present substantial evi- dence that their new drugs work as they claim. No drug could be marketed until the Health, Educa- tion and Welfare Department spe- cifically approved it. The FDA could also specify quality controls over manufactur- ing, suspend drugs of doubtful safety or effectiveness, and in- Senate Committee Okays Berlin Measure WASHINGTON (UPI) The Senate Foreign Relations Commit- tee today unanimously approved a House-passed resolution voicing congressional support for what- ever steps President Kennedy may take io protect U.S. rights in Berlin. The proposal now goes to the Senate for certain final approval. Democratic Leader Mike Mansfield, Mont., said it would be brought up later today or Thursday. More GIs Movedfrom Vie Miss' OXFORD, .Miss. Ar- my sent home today another of ihe troops that have been guarding the peace at the Uni- versity of Mississippi and an- nounced a change in commanders. The Army said today's troop move leaves about regular Army and National Guard troops in the Oxford area. At one time after noting greeted arrival on campus of Negro student James Meredith, about SljOOO troops were stationed around Oxford and at reserve camps at Memphis, Tenn., and Columbus, Miss. Troops leaving today include the headquarters of .the ISth Airborne Corps, commanded by Lt. Gen. Hamilton H. Howze. Howze has been commander of all troops sent to Mississippi as well as federalized Mississippi Na- tional Guardsmen. With his de- parture, command passes to Brig. Gen. Charles Billingslea, com- mander of the 2nd Infantry Divi- sion, the Army announcement said. Meanwhile ,white students con- tinued to harass Meredith at near- ly every step with no apparent disciplinary action by the school administration. A stocky youth even pushed past a U.S. marshal walking with Meredith and shook his finger in Meredith's face. "Nigger, you bettor watch he said. No effort was made to physical- ly harm the 29-year-old Air Force veteran whose forced admission touched off bloody rioting Sept. 30 and a rowdy demonstration Monday night. The campus was relatively quiet Tuesday night.'many of the students attending a performance of "Mark Txvain Tonight" featur- ing Broadway actor Hal Holbrook. Meredith had indicated he might attend the performance but he did not put in an appearance. CAK 1948 Nash, driven by Ethel Eldridge, 1090 llth Street, is hauled out of the East Main Canal at 14th Street ahou p.m. yesterday. The driver said she was traveling north along the west side of the canal when the ear struck ruts and soft dirt, and she lost control. She was wet but uninjured in the accident. Yuma Police Offi- cers Sgt. Joe Hickey and George Martinez investigated. (Sun Staff Photo) Cardinal Says Prospects Good for Christian Unity VATICAN CITY Fran- cis Cardinal Spellman of New York said today that prospects are good for Christian unity aris- ing from the 21st Ecumenical Council, the highest assembly of the Roman Catholic Church open- g Thursday. "There are good prospects and everybody is tremendously in- terested." Cardinal Spellman told newsmen at the airport when he arrived this morning to complete the 225-member American delega- tion to the council. I'm hoping and praying for the success of the council." Nearly .'1000 Catholic prelates and 50 non-Catholic "observers" and "guests" from all parts of the earth were on hand for the colorful opening ceremonies in the Basilica of St. Peler's. mother church of Christendom and larg- est in the world. Historically, this gathering will be known as ihe second Vatican Council, the rirst to be held in almost a cen- tury. The purpose of the great coun- cil, as stated by Pope John XXIII is to get his own church of 500 million members to "bring itself into step with modern times." In line with this, he extended a "genile invitation" to other Chris- tians to join with the church of Rome, with .the eventual aim re- storing universal Christian unity. There was little hope of bring- ing this about immediately, but it is a long-range goal. Bishop Fred P. Corson, president of the World Council of Methodists and Bishops for the Philadelphia area, made this clear when he com- mented that "we are here simply as observers, not. as negotiators." ...rick 2nd pgh Speaking Cooling Weather Forecast Here High temperatures will drop a bit by Friday, or so forecasters at the U.S. Weather Bureau in Yuma believe. The temperature drop will be ac- I companied by some light winds. Overnight tows will remain about the same. U.S. Officials Believe Reds Still in Laos WASHINGTON offi- cials said today they believed "several thousand" Communist North Vietnamese troops were still in Laos in violation of an Inter- national accord signed last sum- mer. The State Departmenl, however, was reluctant to make formal complaint of violation preferring for the moment to work quietly through diplomatic channels. Under a 14-nation agreement signed at Geneva July 23, all for- eign forces were supposed to be out of Laos by last Sunday. Rus- sia and the United States were among the signers. Tresh Blasts Three-Run Homer in 8th NEW YORK Rookie Tom Tresh slammed a three-run homer in the eighth inning today to give the New York Yankees a 5-3 victory over the San Francisco Gianls in the fifth game of ths World Series. It was the first World Series vic- tory for New York's Ralph Terry. The triumph gave the Yanks an 3-2 edge in the series and put them in the driver's seat. The teams tra- vel tomorrow and the series re- sumes in Candlestick Park in San Francisco Friday. The Giants took a 1-0 lead in the third inning. Jose Pagan led off with a single. He was sacrificed to second by pitcher Jack Sanford. Chuch Hiller then doubled, scoring Pagan. The Giants got a run in the fifth frame to stretch the margin to 2-0. The run scored on a home run by Pagan that was blasted far into the left field seats. The Yanks picked up a run in the fourth inning after Tresh drop- ped a double into short center field and scored on a wild pitch by Sanford. New York got another ran to tie the score in the sixth inning with Bobby Richardson scor- ing on a passed ball after he had led off the inning with a single. The game decider for the Yanks came in the big three-run eigfhth. Tony Kubek singled to right with one out and that was followed by a single by Richardson, Kubelj stopping at second. Tresh then powered his home run in the familiar right field stands, scoring Kubek and Richardson ahead of him and giving the Yanks a 5-2 lead. San Francisco rallied in the bot- tom of the ninth as Willie McCovey led off with a single through the middle. Tom Haller, with one out, doubled into deep center field, scoring McCovey. Pagan grounded out and Ed Bai- ley, pinch-hitting, lined out deep to Roger Mat-is in right field to end the game. A crowd of fans gathered in Yankee Stadium to see the fifth game. It was scheduled for yester- day but was postponed because of GEN. WALKER PRAISED: Foflwrt Here is today's fallout predic- tion: with San Diego as ground zero, high-level, or fallout winds, predicted for the next 24 hours will be 60 degrees, ENE, in the direction of Salfon Sea. Fallout would travel approximately 60 miles in three hours. 1 Today's high was expected to j 1 he around fl7, the same as yester- i day's high reading. The low to- morrow morning should be a bit Lull U.S. To Sleep Says Freedom Forum Visitor warmer than the registered today, the Ii2 mark. Americans are being lulled to sleep by policy makers in the State Department while Commu- 5S-degrce low nisls quietly lake over, Robert hovering near Morris, attorney and former cir- I cuit court judge of New Jersey, er are expected lo continue. Clear skies and moderate weath-1 .a Frepdnm forum sroup last population than 55 of these small- er nations, also has only one vote. Turning to Cuba he said, "The leaders of our State Department keep putting us to sleep and assur- ing us that we have, nothing to worry about." Meanwhile, Morris said, Khrushchev has boasted that he has moved an army to within 90 miles of our shores. Ariz. Western Scholarships Hit I night. About 100 persons assembled in the Planet Room of the Stardust i Hotel to hear the speaker. Mor- ris is author of the Iwok, "No Wonder We Are Losing." He took part in the interrogation of Alger Hiss. Abraham Abel and the Ros-, enhergs. He served as chief coun- i It is these small neutral nations coming into the United Nations, each with a vote, which under- mines the power of the United States, -Morris said. He pointed out that the United States with more sel to the Senate Internal Securi- Helped Castro ty Committee from 1952-56. .Morris said Castro was helped T-, Morris was introduced to. the i into power bv neoole in Unit The dnve lo obtain j sroup by T. o. Toon, of Ted Toonj ed'States. He said it funds for Arizona Western Colleg is continuing with a total ol 52.350, i according to Dr. John H. Barnes, college president. and Associates Inc.. Dallas. Tex. and of Trade Policy Congress, Washington. D.C. Toon comment- i ed on the Mississippi events, call- Newest scholarships to come in.j ;n; Maj. Gen. Edwin Walker "a are two S100 awards by the Yuma patriot if there ever was one." and Kiks LoiliM. Exalted Ruler Ray! added, "he deserves our prayers Fritz pointed out that the schol-lthis night and forever more." He arships are for S100 a year for j said he and Morris were returning each of :hc v.vo yo.ir.-. j ;o Washington io "see to it he Other scholarship donations to h Walker! was no longer persecut- date inf'urlr [mm. the Yuma! ed and prosecuted." Junior Chamlv of Commerce: 5100 from the Yuma Fine Arts As- Morris traced the development of the communist drive for world domination (rom World War II sociaiion Inc.: from Dr. and j when he said the United States Barnes: from Rraden j allowed them to seizr German MORE Western College's scholarship funds are growing daily. The Yuma Elks Lodge yesterday presented two 5100 scholarships to Dr. John B. Barnes college president. Making the presentation is Ray Fritz, exalted ruler. At right is Warren Conrad, Elks scholarship chairman. Model of junior college is in foreground. Staff Machinery Gi.: from The Arizona Bank; SI50 from C. Van Horn Cirrus Care, Inc. and S600 from the Cabalieros de Yuma Inc. Information on'scholarships may be obtained by calling the college office, located in Tne Arizona Bank building downtown, at SU 3-SS3L seizr German missile scientists. He said the United States came out of the sec- ond world war strong but has gone downhill since. Key to the strength, according to Morris, if neutralism. He said left-leaning neutral countries such as Laos and Indonesia are really "sly allies of KhnishciMv." was not un- til late in that it was ac- knowledged by then State Depart- ment Chief Christian Herter that Castro's Cuba was a military camp of the Communists. Aiorris said the State Depart- ment policy makers' plan is for dis- armament, breaking up the arm- ies, then turning over authority to an international court of justice and finally giving the internation- al court a police force more pow- erful than any :n the world. His solution offered to those who did not want this to happen was m' two parts. Be informed about wliat is happening he (oid the au- dience and seek to convert others to. your way of thinking. The sec- ond part of the advice he offered was for individuals to take an ae- part in politics, knowing tht precinct workers, knowing the can- didates and voting for the man whose ideas coincided with individual's, to he Ooaocntio tf Retwbiicaq,   

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