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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: October 3, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - October 3, 1962, Yuma, Arizona                             House Com. Okays Fight Berlin Plan WASHINGTON (UP1I The House Foreign Affairs Commute today unanimously approved a a resolution declaring that the United States will fight, if neces- sary, to preserve Western Rights in Berlin. The resolution is similar to a fight-if-wc must declaration on Cuba passed last wek by the House and Senate. The Berlin resolution stales that this country would regard as "in- tolerable" any violation by the Soviet Union "directly or through others" of Western rights in or access to Berlin. "The United States is deter- mined to prevent by whatever means may be necesary, includ- ing the use of arms, any viola- tion of those rights. .and to ful- fill our commitmenl to the people .of Berlin with respect their re- freedom." resolu- tion said. Many i h e y j wjnied to make it clear to the world, through enactmem oi reso- lutions on both Cuba ami Berlin, Ihn! President Kennedy will have full congressional backing from any I steps he deems necessary to pro- test U.S. interests while Congress is in adjournment. congressional news: ....Trade: Undersecretary of State George W. Ball was scheduled to lOc THE WEATHER HiRnesi yesterday, record thli date. 306 Loweit this morning Temperature at 11 a.m. today SS Relative humidity at 11 a.m. Average high this date Avenue low this date 6S FORECAST to Thursday nlf-ht: CoirJnued clear and a little coolpr today through Thursday. Occasional, Kusty winds. Low-Co. Sunset YUMA 234 16 PAGES PER COPY lOc YUMA, ARIZONA, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1962 PHONE SU 3-3333 ARIZONA 234 Schirra Sets US Space Record Ariz. Western Board Wins; Blake Shades Baker Yarwood Is Victor at Crane School Unofficial election returns ind cated today that all five incum- bent Arizona Western College go before a special House com-1 Board of Trustees members would miliee today to detail the admin- istration policy on Allied ships that carry strategic goods to com- munist Cubn. He was expecied to reveal how successful this coun- try has been in persuading its Allies to stop such activities. Works: Election-conscious law- makers lurncd happily -to public works projects today. House-Sen- ate conferees were trying to reach a compromise appropriation of about 55 billion to finance con- tinued work on existing project The House called up for actio a 52.3 billion bill to authorize 16 additional projects. continue serving on the hoard. And in a tight Yuma Union High School board contest, Incumbent Sieve Blake led Joe Baker 1023. seven-vote margin, 1030 BBC Relays TV of Schirra to Soviet Tape Flight LONDON (UPH The Brilisl Broadcasting Corporation shown a video (ape by Telstar relay to- day of astronaut Schirra' Uiunchins info space, and fed i to the Soviet Union for showing tli ere. The London for tlie request from the Soviet Union fo the transmission. It came "us we were on UK a spokesman said. "We ini mediately said yes. Bui L don' know if thoy picked il up." 1 he added, ''Uiej will pick up the next Telstar trans mission two hours from now." The Tolstnr nvi as miss ion a was received in Paris, where the pictures were described as fair Finnish television also picked i up, but did not telecast it immed ialely, preferring to wait for larger audience in the evening. Independent Television, Britain's commercial television channel, al- so showed the launch. In Italy, people jammed bars to uaich the transmission, which oc- casionally blanked out. West Germany did not telecast the transmission immediately. Like Finland, WesJ German tele- vision decided (o show the launch- ing on newscasts tonight. Senate Applauds Hayden on His 85th Birthday WASHINGTON work weary Senate took a moment Tuesday to give a round of ap- plause to Sen. Carl Hayde, R- its president pro icmporc. on bis S5lh birthday. Democratic Leader Mike Mans- field. Mont., voiced the Senate's greetings and congratulations to the veteran AnV.onan. dean of the Senate in length of sen-ice. Senators rose and gave Hayden a rousing hand of applause. Grinning. Hayden pretended to join the hand-clapping. Then he replied: "What iMansfieldl has said makes me very happy to be 85 years young." Bulletin: STBTYORK-A base- 'merit; boiler explo- )ded and- was [through an; Upper IfanhatUn office cannonball collapsing and Celling! on c or ea ot, young nozen .At least 20 were killed and others were trap- l a detd tare The five current college board members were apparently reelec- ted in yesterday's county-wide balloting. Lone challenger Bill Helm trailed approximately GOO votes behind the next-lowest can didate, Don Soldwedel. The top five vote-getters in the six-man election received seats, and their terms will range from three years to one year, depending on where they ended up in the final tabula- tion. Yarwood Wias In the only, oilier two contestei elections in the Yuma area, in cumbent Clark Yarwood defeater Karl A. Dennis and Harvey (Bud Self for a seat on the Crane Schoo Board. Wellton Grammar Schoo Trustee and incumbent A. D. Arn old was apparently unseated b Leslie Gallaher, 5S-G5. At Crane Yarwood received 182 votes, i for Dennis nnd 61 for Sc.'f Voiers in Yuma Gramma School District No. 1 approved us age of a ten-cent levy to purchase land adjacent to Rolle School. Balloting approved 'the purchase by a -I6S-167 margin at the Dis trict Administration Office, and bj 312-7S margin at Gila Jr. High Voters were isiructed to cast votes for five of tile six college board candidates, but most elec- tors in the Wellton-Mohawk are; varied this pattern by casting "single shot" ballots for only one man, Milt Lewis, in an apparent attempt to help keep a man from thai area on the college board. In tlie rest of the county the vote pattern was fairly evenly distribut- between the five elected candi- dates, with Helm trailing. But in the Wellton and Mohawk irecincts. Lewis totaled 172 votes, compared to only -12 for the next- lighesl man. Several candidates no votes at all from Mo- tawk electors. The effort jumped Lewis from fourth to second in the inal totals, and assured him of hree-year ierm instead of a two- vear term in office. An area school official, who de- clined to be identified, said pre- eleclion efforts by Lewis support- ers in Wellton, Mohawk, P.oll and Tacna notified void's of the planned strategy-. According to The Sun's unoffi- cial tally. Don Butler and Milt .ewis were re-elected to three- i-ear terms. Dr. John Wilhelmy inri Sam Haydis will soi-ve two- Tar icnns. and Don Solriwedel's erm will end next year. Helm was 'liminated. Butler is from the Somcrton- area. Haydis is from the lorthern Yuma County area of Sa- onie. and Lewis is from the Well- on-Mohawk area. Wilhelmy and boklwcdel are from Yuma. as is lelm. In non-contested races, incum- icnt Robert K. Johnson received .070 votes returning him to his eat on the Yuma Grammar ichoo! Disl. No. 1 board. Antelope High School trustee Allan larlatt received 138 votes in his c-elertion hid iHyder and Aztec 10! David Lot! received a votes for re-election to Ihe ladsden Public School Board, in- timbent Mohawk Valley School ward member Jimmy Maquin re- vived -17 votes and Somerton chool trustee Harry Ellis received 17 votes. Will Land In Pacific At p.m Y i CAPK CANAVERAL na., today while scores of employes I Murphy said at 20 persons M Schirra Jr 39 were eating lunch in the building were dead, most of them young jset a new TJ g" space flight'rec- 20 Killed as Explosion Rips Office Building NEW YORK IL'PD- A tremen- rous explosion ripped through an Upper Manhaitnn office building Manhattan's Inwood section, was damaged heavily. Police Commissioner Michael i C X V E R L Fla cafeteria. At least 20 were killed women. and 50 injured. A United Firemen said several persons KE-ELECXED These five incumbents on the Arizona Western College Board were re-elected yesterday. From left are Don Soldwectel, secretary; Milt Lewis, Sam Hay- dis. Dr. John Wilhelmy, president; and Don Butler. The latter was the top vote getter. This group was successful in turning back the challenge of Bill Helm of Yuma. (Sun Staff Photo) Yuma Union High School District S. R. Joe Blake Baker Pet. Wilhelmy Norlhern ARIZONA WESTERN COLLEGE BOAKD SoMwedel Lewis Hayrtis Butler Helm Yuma Co. Yuma High Gila Vista Adm. Off. Wellton Mohawk Kofa Gadsden Somerton Crane TOTAL 165 2-13 359 3S5 36 li 121 49 115 297 1976 1-15 22-1 335 51! 33 0 107 IS 105 26S 1779 Hyder and Aztec not reporting. 182 213 3-1-1 537 US -16 ru 45 104 2S7 1990 240 212 320 553 38 0 102 39 101 265 1870 175 239 356 593 37 0 124 51 122 315 2012 166 130 203 292 27 3 70 2S 64 175 1305 STEVE BLAKE Pet. Yuma High Adm. Bldg Kola High Gila Vista Crane Somerton Gadsden TOTAL 153 383 70 178 177 51 18 126 300 65 236 174 83 39 1030 1023 CLARK YARWOOD Meredith Given Aptitude Tests at Mississippi U. imeticas Expected 'o Get Tough with Cuba WASHINGTON (UPI> The 'nitcd Stales and most of its Lat- n American allies were expected i join today in endorsing tougher ndividtial and c Jlectivc efforts to lock the spread of Cuban-based >mmunism. The two-day conference of Latin merican foreign ministers called y Secretary of Stitc Dean Rusk to conclude its work at a ite afternoon session at the State "Apartment. OXFORD, lUPli The University of Misissippi began putting Negro James Meredith, 29, hrough routine aptitude tests to- day and otherwise attempted to >ring some semblance of normal- cy bck to the strife-torn campus. But troops guarding against a further outbreak of violence re- nained and had to break up n small demonstration shortly after midnight when a group of students brew rocks and bottles and ex- ploded firecrackers. Meredith was driven to the Ly- rcum Building about a.m. for lie aptitude tests. Registrar Rob- ert Kills said all new students must take the tests and said they yould have no bearing on llorc- lith's ability to remain as a Indent. An Army spokesman said the 'small demonstration" occurred several hours Irefore Negro James I. Meredith. 29, was to begin his bird day of classes at the strife- orn university. There were no ar- Ite said, ami relatively ,cw youths were involved. The spokesman said some bot- tles and rocks were thrown at the dormitory in which Meredith w.is sleeping. Xo damage or injuries were reported. The students .ilso exploring firecrackers into the air before soldiers, stationed on the campus to prevent further rioting over the admission of Mer- edith to the former all-white uni- versity, broke up the gathering. The incident only briefly broke the uneasy calm which has settled over the campus and the small town of Oxford since federal troops moved in to quell rioting and restore order early Monday. The Army moved 3.600 para- troopcrs out of Oxford Tuesday night in what was described as a "regrouping of forces." The maneuver left about 11.000 sol- diers in the area to watch the tense situation surrounding .Mere- dith's enrollment. Armed sentries remained on to back the administration in its determination that. Mississippi would comply with court-ordered integration. llnngcd In Effigy Meredith, a 29-year-old Air Force veteran, was hanged in ef- figy Tuesday night from a third- floor window of the dormitory next to his. "We'll be glad when you're gone." rend a cardboard placard hanging from a straw dummy's neck. Confederate- flags flew from other adjacent dormitories, offer- ing mute testimony to con- sensus of local opinion over Mere- dith's admission to the univer- to the dormitory his effigy hung. Next door from which Meredith slept in a bare, white- walled room shared by a U.S. marshal. Dttsen Leaves Hospital WASHINGTON7 (UPI) Senate GOP Leader Everett M. Dirksen was released Monday from Bc- thesda Naval Hospital after treat- ment over the weekend for an abdominal ailment. Lawyers Ask Day in Court For Walker SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (UPII Attorneys sought today to obtain a 'day in court" for former Army Maj. Gen. Edwin A. Walker, confined for psychiatric examina- tion at the U.S. hospital for fed- eral prisoners. "All we for is simple jus- said attorney Clyde Watts, himself a former Army general and long-time friend of Walker. Walker was brought to the hos- pital Monday night after his ar- rest during integration riots at the University of Mississippi in Ox- ford. He was charged with rebel- lion, insurrection and seditious conspiracy. Watts, of Oklahoma City and one-time Senate investigator Dr. Robert Morris of Dallas and two other attorneys planned to seek writ of habeas corpus in fed- eral court here for Walker's re- lease. They claimed the federal district court in Mississippi had no legal jurisdiction in issuing the order calling for the psychiatric examination. The former general was unable to raise 5100.000 bond before be- ing brought to the hospital from Oxford. While his attorneys were raising the bail Tuesday, U.S. Dis- trict Judge Claude F. Clayton of .Mississippi's Northern District or- dered the psychiatric examination normally a 60-to-90-day procedure. The order eliminated the possib- ility of release on bail. "This order was simply fantas- said Watts. "It quoted a sec- lion of the United States Code which provides for the examina- tion if the U.S. attorney believes the defendant is insane or so men- tally incompetent that he is un- able to understand the proceed- ings against him or ;o assist in his own defense." Watts said he had talked with Walker a! length and found him "clear. lucid, undisturbed and in complete pos-'csion of au [acuities." were trapped in the debris. Police said more than 400 per- sons were in the building when the blast, apparently from the boiler in the basemen! below the cafeteria, occurred. Fifty minutes afier the blast, a fire department spokesman said rescuers had not been able to get everyone out of the building. "People are siill trapped in the he said. Press International sp; I ord today by sailing reporter at the scene had counted 16 bodies recovered. The blast showered the area with debris. Several nearby build- inis were damaged. A girl who works in the build- ing. Pat Cox, 18, said tlie walls and the ceiling of the building started to fall in" and she rushed out. Miss Cox said she believed the The explosion occurred in tlie basement of the building housing a New York Telephone Company accounting office. The building, at 213th St. and Broadway in Upper Tanner Bid Low For 3rd Street Paving Work Tanner Paving and Materials Co. of Yuma yesterday squeaked through with the low bid on pav- ing 3rd Street between Avenue A 'and B from 1st Street to 70 feet south of Magnolia Avenue. The improvement district, Number 43A, also includes construction of two bridges, across the East Main Canal and across the West Main Canal. Tanner's bid base bid on the job, and Arrow Con- struction Co. bid base bid. On the recommendation of City Engineer, Mulford Winsor, Tanner was awarded the job. Con- struction is expected to begin wiln- in about a month. Tucson Concrete Pipe Co. won the bid for Ihe construction of Storm Sewer District G which will scree tlie area between 16th and 24th Streets east of 4th Avenue. The film's base bid was and Marshall and Haas, Enginer's Estimate on cost of the construction was In another bid opening. Arizona Utility Equipment Sales Corp. was awarded the contract to furnish the Yuma Fire Department with an extension ladder. The bid was explosion took place in the front of the two-story building which houses a business office of the company. The blast occurred on the south side of the building. A police department official said 75 to 100 persons were in the building when the explosion occurred. He said many of them were believed to be trapped. At least 10 amublances were sent to the scene at 213th St. and Broadway as well as two disaster and two emergency units. The injured were carried out onto the sidewalk and placed in chairs and on the sidewalk. The dead were brought out and taken to a room on the north side of the building. Here is today's fallout predic- tion: With San Diego as ground zero, high-level, or fallout winds, predicted for the next 24 hours will he 50 degrees. NE, in the direction of Borrego Springs and Salton Sea. Fallout would travel 100 miles in three hours. 13 Indictments Returned by U.S. Grand Jury TUCSON' (UPH A federal grand jury returned 13 indict- ments and eighi no bills to end an all-day session in U.S. district court here. Indictments i s s u e il Tuesday light included two for murder, one for kidnapping and six 'or narcotics violations, one on iqtior tax violations and one on lostal violations. Two of the indictments were secret because Ihe persons named have not been arrested. James Henry Meador. 22. of Santa Monica. Ca'if.. was accused of kidnapping and rape. He had cscaixvl from custody ihree times, lis latest from the Pima County ail. He terrorized :wo Tucson women during his .-hort period of freedom. Tucson Widow Stabbed, Beaten TUCSON (UPII A 62-year-old widow was in critical condition at St. Joseph's Hospital today after being stabbed and beaten. Sheriff's d e p u t i e s said Mrs. Pauline Saxon was able to de- scribe her unknown attacker as a 35-year-old man light hair and an "odd-colored" shirt. said there was no apparent reason lor the attack. They said the assailant gained entry into Mrs. Saxon's home by asking to use a telephone. Then he stabbed the woman in the back and chest with a butcher knife and once in the chest with a 10-inch crochet needle. Tn addi- tion, he choked and beat her. Space Flight At A Glance CAPE.. CANAVERAL.. Mercury-Atlas-8, spaceship for or- bital flight of astronaut Walter M. Schirra Jr., a; a glance: Booster Modified Atlas inter- continental ballistic missile, de- livering pounds of thrust. Capsule Bell-shaped Mercury spacecraft, named "Sigma 7." Pilot Walter M. Schirra Jr., 39, N'avy commander. Length of MAS 95 feet. Weight at lift-off pounds. Weight nf Mercury capsule at lift-ntf More than two tons, in- cluding escape tower. Weight nf fuel (high grade ker- osene called RP-1) pounds. Weight of liquid oxygen (oxi- (lUer fo burn fuel in airless space 1GO.OOO pounds. Launch No. 14, Cape Canaveral. Period of powered rocket flight -About five minutes. of parts in Atlas- More than 300.000. of which about are moving parts. flight around the earth three times and soaring on toward a planned landing in the Pacific at the end of six orbits. The two previous orbital flights by American astronauts ended in the Atlantic after three circuits of the globe. As Schirra approached the be- ginning of his crucial fourth orbif space officials in the Mercury Control center told him he could go on and fry for six orbits. The Navy commander respond- ed with a. jubilant The plan called for Schirra tn fire his retro rockets and begin his return to earth alxiut p.m. PDT just south of Japan. About 20 minutes later he was to splash down in the Pacific north- west of Hawaii. Schirra and his Sigma 7 space- craft lifted into space atop an At- las missile at a.m. PDT. His departure from earth was wit- nessed by millions in America and Europe. Tlie Telstar com- munication satellite relayed pic- tures of the fiery takeoff to Eu- ropean countries. The astronaut1 s shout when he was told after three orbits to go ahead into his fourth and try for six was his most emotional reaction of t h e flight up to then. He had been calmly cheerful throughout his first three circuits. He had reported, with a jubilant note in his voice, that Sigma 7 was "flying beautifully." Cry Sheer Triumph But his response to Hie six- orbit go-ahead was a cry of sheer triumph. Schirra made thr sible by strictly ahead pos- ving his jet control fuel suj luring his early orbits. When he "ent into his fourth circuit he stii. had 90 per cent of the hydrogen peroxide fuel with which Merucry space- craft are controlled in orientation. Astronaut Scott Carpener in his three-orbit flight May 24 used up so much of his control fuel before the end that he. had none left to stabilize the space cabin in its descent. By conserving his fuel. Schirra made certain that he would have enough left at the end of six orbits to put Sigma 7 in right po- sition to fire braking rockets and bring himself down to a Pacific landing. Wrong orientation at this mo- ment, expected shortly after 2 p.m. PDT. could mean disaster for the astronaut. LT. COMDE. WALIEB M. SCHOUCA JR.   

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