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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: March 31, 1961 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - March 31, 1961, Yuma, Arizona                             The EdKors Notebook JONES OSBORN Political scientists are mostly in favor.of short ballot. They say that if try to fill too many public offices by elec- tion, the average voter votes blind- ly on a large number of them. He may know something useful about the top five or six men run- ning but after that he is usually just guessing. But look at what is happening in Texas: A total of 71 persons running for the same office! Yes, 70 Democrats and 1 Repub- lican, all seeking the seat in the U.S. Senate formerly held by Vice President Lyndon Johnson. Well, out of such a mob you are bound to get some beauts. One man says he believes in the right of every citizen "to segre- gate himself." Another candidate has a scheme for ending the recession. He would offer a thousand dollars to every married woman with a job, if she would quit work. At least half of them would accept, he says, there; by creating four million jobs for men. And another two million jobs would be created when those four million women went out and spent their thousand-dollar bills (a total of 54 "The eyes of Texas" are upon feat Senate seat, for certain. Hunt Continues For Lost Flier- Businessman ST. JOHNS An inten- sive air search began this morning for two Eastern Arizona business- men, Virgil and E. Farr Whiting, missing since Wednesday on a flight from here to Phoenix. Weather cleared over the state durng the night, allowing a fuB Ciyil Air Patrol search to begin. By mid morninj'Miearly 50 planes we.re scouring the area from Phoenix northeastward to St Johns and on to the. New Mexico border around Lupton. In addition to the air search the Apache county.sheriffs office.had ground search parties in several areas along the route, witii headquarters at Cibeque on the Fort Apache Reservation. One of the heaviest concentra- tions of airplanes in. the search was around Show Low, where a plane similar, to that, of the Whit- ings was reported to. have at- tempted a landing shortly .afier-1 p. m. Wednesday. Bad weather forced the plane to turn around and head back for St. Johns. The Whitings left St. Johns at 1 p. m. Wednesday for business appointments in Phoenix, but nev- er arrived. Their last contact was a radio message at the Tonto Na- tional Forest station in Show Low, saying they appeared to be head- ing into heavy weather. Virgil Whiting, the pilot of the plane, is manager of me Whiti.Tg Brothers planing and saw mill at Eagar. Farr Whiting is manager of the Whiting enterprises head- quarters in St. Johns. The business operates in Ari na, N7ew Mexico, California and Texas. The brothers are the sons of E. I. Whiting, present head of the en- terprises, and grandsons of Ed- win M. Whiting, founder of the family business. Famin Signs Ml PHOENDC (UPI) Gov. Paul Fannin Thursday signed a bill outlawing the Communist party and requiring loyalty oaths ol public employes. This was one of the most con- troversial items of legislation from the recently adjourned first session of the 25th legislature. Fannin also vetoed a bill Thurs- day. It would have abolished Ihe office of post auditor and replac- ed it with the position of legisla- tive officer. 10c SUN THE WEATHER yesterday M Loweit 51 Temperature At 11 i.m, tabf 73 Relative humidity 11 a.m. Avenge klgh thli due 13 Average this date M FORECAST to Saturday nltM: Clear and warmer today and Saturday, High today 88, low tonight 17. YUMA 77 20 PAGES PER COPY IDe YUMA. ARIZONA, FRIDAY, MARCH 31, 1961 PHONE SU 3-3333 ARIZONA 77 Unveil Gib Valley Levee Plans Two Survive Crash of B52 Jet Bomber in South FAIR QUEEN Dennis, ter of Mr. and Mrs. LuA. Dennis, 316 19th Avenue, will compete with 12 other girls for queen of the Yuma County Fair, to be held April 5th through 9th. Miss Dennis is sponsored by the. Yuma American Legion Post. Sun Staff Floods Threaten Damage In Middle West and South By United Press International Tornadoes cut destructive swaths across Georgia today and ftoodwaters made almost per- sons homeless at embattled Ce- dar Rapids, Iowa. A 10 to 14 inch snowfall played havoc with communications and travel in the Southern Plains. Tor- rential rains, up to 8 inches in 2Va hours at Seminary, Miss., washed Dixie from southeastern Oklahoma to the Georgia coastline. A severe flood warning was hoisted along the Pearl, Leaf and Chickasawhay rivers in southern Mississippi, areas hard hit in the big February floods. A tornado killed one person and injured 15 others at Unadilla. Ga., 40 miles south of Macon. Three homes were demolished, all com- munications lines were downed and there was extensive property damage. More than families fled their homes to higher ground be- fore the raging Cedar River at Cedar Rapids. The river rose to 19.51 feet at a.m. today and officials said it was near its crest. More Volunteers Needed Authorities said the city's dikes were holding but more volunteers were needed to bolster the nation- al guardsmen. Army and Navy reservists ami volunteers manning Uic bulwarks. Observers feared the river would hold its crest for 10 to 12 hours and accentuate the manpow- er shortage. The Cedar already had wreaked an estimated J70 million damage upstream in the Waterloo Iowa, area. Cedar Rapids Mayor James Mcagtran said his city could han- dle the floodwatcrs if it could get sufficient workers and if sight- seers would stay out of their way. c___ ,.....r....._... _..... At Waterloo, Iowa, hard hit ear-l34.9 per gallon. At most indepen- licr in the week, streets commis- tlcnts, the prices increased from sioner Carl Fagerlind fainted on 23.9 to 3.9 cents a gallon, flood duty and authorities said. Gasoline prices have fluctuated they would interrupt his vigil for -m phocrex area for some "good long rest.' prompting legislative move- Meahan said ments for in investigation ,of the No. 1 with "price wars." However the pro- flood preparation during the night, i posed inquiry never got out o( taxing ppiict to ban all but committee in titter house gendy traffic across four down- town Cedar Rapids bridges. The deep South, still digging out from February's floods, found new misery brewing in lower Oat- ahoula Parish in Louisiana and the Leaf and Bouie River low- lands of southern Mississippi. Belated Search Gulf rains, 'part of a widespread shower pattern from the southern Great Plains to the south Atlantic states, dumped an inch of water at numerous points in Alabama and Mississippi Thursday night. Hail three-quarters of an inch thick pelted Shreveport, Ka., and high winds tore down utility poles at Opelousas. La. near Larto Lake, La., officials ordered cattle moved to high ground. In the West, snow mounted up to 6 inches and brought traffic nearly to a standstill in the north- ern Texas Panhandle. New Mexi- co officials Thursday blamed the year's worst snowstorm for four fatalities. Another grim reminder of win- ter took shape at Independence Iowa, 20 miles east of floodec Waterloo. Authorities issued a call for volunteers to launch a 13- square-mile search for Jimmy Franck, 4-year-old farm boy who wandered away from home hours before a blinding snowstorm de- scended March 7. A heavy snow cover, much of which melted and contributed to Iowa's floods, de- layed the massive search for more than three weeks. Two Killed, 4 Missing, Feared Dead DENTON, N.C. Air Force B52 jet bomber with eight men aboard apparently exploded in flight Thursday night and crashed in flames near a group of rural farmhouses. Two of the huge plajie's crew of eight were known dead and two of the men survived. The four others were missing and a cold rain and deep mud slowed a search for them, in wooded farm- lands near here today. An Air Force spokesman said he feared the missing may be dead and their bodies buried in a deep; trench-like crater gouged in the sandy clay where the main wreckage of the multimillion dol- lar plane fell. Flames Continue The crater, described by wit- nesses as "big enough to drop a louse was smoking and flam- ing more than 13 hours after the crash despite the rain. The wreck- age was too hot for rescue work- ers to search it. The two survivors parachuted from the plane which plunged to earth from high altitude while on an aerial refueling mission. An Air Force K135 tanker plane was in the vicinity but apparently was unaware that the intercontinental Dow Air Force Base, Maine, was in trouble when the crash occured. Another 'parachute was found hanging in a tree nine miles from the "scene of the by" search- era -todayi: The rains began shortly after the bomber plunged into :the rural countryside with a blinding- flash of p.m.'The'all-night downpours- turned me scene into a. sea mud. Four Air Force helicopters in- cluding :.one' .jet. 'copter were grounded, by the rain' and tow ceiling.- Cars Mired in Mud Rescue vehicles, mighway patrol cars, reporters' automobiles and radio buses trying to go to and from the scene were mired. The plane. plunged into the farmlands near a number of farm houses, but the nearest- telephones were five to seven miles from the scene. The two survivors, one of whom walked seven miles to a farm- house after his'ordeal, were iden- tified as: Maj. WUbur F. Min- nich, 40, the navigator, of Des Plaines, HI.: 1st Lt. GlenlC. Farn- ham, 26, of Loveland, Colo., the electronics warfare officer. Both are married and each has two children. The plane, an intercontinental jet on an aerial refueling mission, carried no nuclear weapons, the Air Force said. The crash scene was a smal patch- of woods, sprinkled with (Continued'on Page 2, Col. 2} FLOOD dotted line, .starting at 'Prison Hill in the center fore- ground, shows the-approximate location of the proposed levee'for the Gila Valley. Plans call for the start of construction as early as June. Points of interest include the old river bridge Territorial Prison and the proposed county park area (Sun Staff Photo) Rusk Back; Encouraged By WASHINGTON (UPI) Secre- tary of State Dean'.Rusk-returned here from key -'allied r conferences' on Laos-, today with; a -declaration' he was "much encouraged" cent developments -in the. crisis'. But.Rusk stressed anew that the Southeast Asia Treaty. Organiza- tion allies would take ''.'appropri- ate action" if peaceful negotiation with the Communists; fails. Rusk, returning from the- SEATQ meeting in also ..indicat- ed the United States .might.accept an unofficial cease-fire., in. .Laps rather .than; a formal-'pledge from the Kremlin. "What is Rusk said, 'is the cessation .of hostilities. If the fighting is'Stopped and it-is clear the fighting .has stopped, an opportunity would :be afforded for negotiations and-discussions." Rusk landed from a trip to the Bangkok meeting -and .a talk, en- route home India Prime Min- ister Jawaharlal Delhi. Nehru in' New State Offices Close 3 Hours on Good Friday PHOENIX (UPI) offices were closed today between noon and 8 p.m. in observance of Good Friday. Gov. Fannin suggested private firms do the same. City, county and federal offices remained open. Algerian Rebels Cancel Peace Talks in France PARIS (UPI) The Algerian rebels_ today announced they will cincel peace talks with France, scheduled .to' start! next.Friday..ij Evian where extremists assassi- nated" Ihe mayor with two-bomb explosions; A rebel spokesman in Tunis did Body of Phoenix Man Recovered From Calif. Gulf PHOENDC- (UPI) The 'body of Leroy.. Davis, of Phoenix, was returned here today after being recovered from the waters of the Gulf of California near Cholla Bay. Davis -and his brother, Floyd, drowned while 'fishing in the gulf last, Davis' body was recovered the following day-, but searchers were unable to find LeRoy's body until Thursday. The Davis brothers opera ted. the Davis Auto .Rebuilders and the Davis Brothers Auto Salvage firms in Phoenix. Their boat apparently capsized during a sudden storm .which struck the gulf Saturday.. Hun- dreds of Arizonans were in the area for the annual Cholla Bay Fishing Derby held last weekend. Three other Phoenicians still are missing on a fishing trip to Ti- buron Island, 200 miles south of Cholla Bay on the Gulf. Phoenix Gasoline Prices Up Again PHOENDC (UPI) Gasoline prices were up again in Phoenix today. At some stations, the price for regular gas jumped from 27.9 to TIGHT G. Muritock, 34, of Yuma, was tmpped in front seat of the damaged truck at the right after it hit a car (left) at Sth and Magnolia yesterday. Murdock suffered severe facial lacerations and leg injuries. City Patrolman George Mar- tinez is in the background. Staff Pbotoi not refer to the; bomb murder to- day pf Mayor-Camilie Blanc bu said .would be in- France had torpedoed them in ad vance..by offering .to. talk., with rival rebel' groups. The spokesman said Taieb Boul Algerian rebel representa- tive in Switzerland. and Rome would' leave Tunis: shortly. to "in- form Swiss -authorities of the de- cision. Switzerland was being informed because the rebel peace negotiators: planned -to base there He said France had. not been informed officially; Boulharouf was one of the. rebe emissaries who .made arrange- ments fo. the ill-fated peace con- erences in Evian a .French resort .town across Lake Geneva from Geneva. Soon' after the mayor Evian was rilled this morning both French government -and' rebel authorities said the tragedy, would not'affect the peace, talks. But the rebels said they would cancel .the' talks if France went ahead with plans to talk .with rival rebel groups. Guardsmen To Aid ti Needy Food Distribution PHOENDC (UPI) The .Arizo- na National. Guard will aid in distribution of surplus cpmmodi ties to needy families in Arizona. Gov. Paul" Fannin asked me guardsmen to transport the food stuffs to the county seat, where county officials will handle dis- tribution in' various' communities Construction Could Start In June By JOHX HOFFMAN The Bureau of Reclamation un- plans this morning for the iroposed South Gila flood control evee. Paul Oliver, chief of river con- rol from the division officer in Boulder. Colo., announced the evee, one of the last remaining lood control projects in the area, originally planned to be start- d in December, but because of. the Kennedy administration speed- p program it will be advanced s much as six.months. Oliver explained the district not .be taxed for the con- traction or maintenance of the evee project. Flood Risk He said with the present dams here is still a risk of floods in. the Gila Valley. CGting the levee the other side of the river, he laid this would tend to shove the ivater into the low lands on this side. The'levee plans cafl for about an eight to 10-foot dirt structure' running from Prison HSU in a. southeasterly direction to a line, one quarter of a mile north of the extension 8th Street, going east along this line and then turning southeast and angling into the Gila River. The levee work'Is planned to contain: aSMS-eWsieconel1 teet flood water. The levee wcsid .require, a 250 foot rightof-way. Oliver'said the Bureau planned to clear-all the .undergrowth in the Hood area between .the- river and the. levee from Prison Hill to-Lai guna Dam to .allow and even flow during a. highwater period. Encoormgo Agriculture In this area, he said, large agri- cultural developments would-be encouraged to ,'area clearv He said small operations would: be discouraged because of fences and so. forth .that would again inter- rupt the; water- flow. ,He said the levee !wouH include. about 55 acres of private land and 20 acres of city land. The old bridge over the Colo- rado is he because the water, will have to be narrowed at this point and a large Door area will have to be left hind the bridge between the river and the levee. "Without the levee Oliver said it' is possible, that .flood waters could be between six and 10 feet deep as far south as 8th Street. (tuestions PUas Gene Price, who identified him- self as an interested party in the recreational plans for the river at Yuma, questioned Oliver about the plans for a county park along the river. Oliver said he thought if. should not interfere, but it kept (Continued on Page 2, Cot 1) Eighth Street Accidents Injure Two Yuma Drivers Two persons were injured here yesterday in separate accidents on 8th Street. Russell G. .Murdock, 34, 900 Magnolia Avenue, was trapped in- side 1960 Volkswagen delivery Iruck'. for several minutes before could be freed after an acci- dent at the intersection of 8th Street and 15th Avenue about p.m. yesterday. Murdock, driving the truck owned by Calls Floor Covering, 236 E. 16th Street, was going west on Sth Street when a south bound 1955 Ford on 15th Avenue failed to yield the right-of-way after making a stop at a stop sign and pulled in front of Murdock, ac- cording to City Police. Driver CHe4 The Ford was driven by Helen 0. Ochoa, 26, 462 Ifith Avenue. She was cited for failure to yWd the right-of-way at a stop sign. Sgt. Keith' Westgalc was in charge of the investigation and estimated the dtnaflt to Volkswagen at and to the Ford. Murdock was reported in "fair condition" at Parkview Baptut Hospital this morning. A 14-year-old Yuma boy was In- jured while driving a motorcycle about p.m. yesterday after- noon on Sth Street near the in- tersection on Avenue A. Mtoor Florentine M. Munoz Jr., 14, 2944 Avenue B, received minor hW jury while driving his 1960 Har- !ey-Davidson Motorcycle wheu a 1950 Chevrolet driven by Douglas James GuMen. 31, 250 20th Ave- nue, made a left tun in front at htm, police reported. Munoz wax driving MJ( on Wh Street and Gulden was fotng west.- GuMen attempted to Mm left in front of XUMK and MUMC cmM into him. Gulden WM lor to yield the rifht-of-way MOMB for no driver'! Mi IBM aad no nf> Utralkw.   

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