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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: October 4, 1960 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - October 4, 1960, Yuma, Arizona                             By JONES OSBORN You think the pollsters arc con- fused? This year's presidential race hai EVERYone guessing! Even the formidable Associated Press. I remember AP vividly. It was during the 1960 Demo- cratic National Convention in Los Angeles. Down on the floor, a massive long- est of them going on for Adlai Stevenson. To all outward appearances, Stevenson was still a possibility. 10c S4MSUN THE WEATHER yesterday lllxhcst Tlll'ycstwi 87 33 71) 63 .50 C-'V I I U A I A'D I 1 M CXJ T Lowest Lowest Till Temperature at 11 a.m. today Jlelatlve humidity at 11 a.m. Average hlfih this date 95 Average low this date 63 XORKCAST to Wednesday nlsht: Variable high cloudiness today and Wednesday. Little In humidity or temperature. High today tow tonlcht 70. YUMA 56-1WO. 235 14 PAGES PER COPr (Oc YUMA, ARIZONA, TUESDAY. OCTOBER 4, I960 PHONE SU 3-3333 ARIZONA 235 But right in the middle of the Stevenson demonstration, the Los Angeles Examiner hit the streets, and copies flooded convention hall. The Examiner carried a story by Associated Press which stated flatly that Kennedy half the nom- ination wrapped up and even told how every state was going to vote! AP was-positive, then. But listen to them, now: "ARIZONA: Most political analysis think it's Nixon with little to spare, as ot now. This estimate is based largely on a conservative trend among Ari- zona voters in recent years. Sen. Barry Goldvvaler's influence is expected'to give Nixon a lift. However, Democrats are more united and better organized than any time since 1918. Leaders of both parties say sentiment ban not jelled in many areas. The reUglous issue apparently is growing here." That's a long-winded way of saying, "We don't know, either." Officials Plan To Attend Yuma Confab A''number of high ranking pub- lic'officials have accepted invita- tions to address the Yuma Con- ference concerning the develop- ment pf.Jhe Colorado River. The conference will be held here Nov. llth and" 12th. Includ- ed as speakers are Rep. Stewart Udall, Gov. Paul Fannin, Secre- tary of State Wesley Bolin; Judge John Bonner, attorney for the Col- orado River Commission, and Ber- nard 'Mergen, manager of the Ari- zona State Development Board. Also, on the program will be Bpyd Gibbons, special assistant to Gov. Fannin; Bob Fields, indus- trial development representative Arizona Public Service; and George Christie, manager of the southwest regional office of the U.S. Department-of Commerce. Dan Halpin( manager of the Yuma Chamber of Commerce, said that reservations are coming in steadily for the con- ference. From 300 to 500 persons are expected to attend from Ari- zona, California, and Nevada plus some from Mexico. Registration fee is while the complete pack- age for the conference, two lunch- eons, two banquets and two pool- side receptions is 525. Quadras Leads In Returns f ram Brazil Election RIO DE JANEIRO (UPI) -Op- position candidate Janio Quadros pullerl ahead of his tw-, today in early -inconclusive returns from Brazil's presidential elec- tions. Wiilj less than 1 per cent of an estimated 12 million ballots count- ed, Quadros had polled votes compared with for Marshal Henrique Teixeira Lott. the administration candidate, and for Adhemar De Barros, independent. An equally tight race was un- der way for the vice presidency. Li. Khrttshchev and British Prime Min- ister Harold Mae- met for today 1ft t that the Soviet Eases Its Attack on Dag U.S. Launches 500-Pound Radio Station Satellite Will Relay Messages CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (UPI) The United States .aunched a 500-pound earth satel- lite radio station today on Ihe third birthday of the Sputnik- spawned age of space. The 51-inch ball, dabbed Cour- ier IB, carried high-speed tape recorders and radio equipment to serve as an orbiting microwave post to relay top-secret military communications around the earth's surface. The satellite rode aloft in the nose of an 80-foot Thor-Able-Star rocket. The shot, a repeat of an attempt which failed Aug. 18 when a rocket blew up, was aimed toward an orbit 650 miles high and as close to the equator as possible. Courier carried U.S. hopes for the nation's 28th space success since Russia stunned the world Oct. 4, 1957, by sending Sputnik I into orbit around earth. The Soviet Union has seven other space successes. Courier IB was the first step in a plan to provide Free World mil- itary forces with, instantaneous and espionage-free communica- tions. It weighed nearly three times as much as the 184-pound Sputnik I, and was described as "the: most complex 'satellite ever built." 5 If successful, Courier IB would relay. regular hews dispatches of United Press International and the .Associated Press by high- speed radio-teletype from Ft. Mon- mouth, N.J., to an Army Signal Corps station in Puerto Rico as one of its first tests. "Courier's basic function was to receive and record high-speed radioteletype and voice, messages from one station, and .relay them to another when .triggered by a coded signal, all; on microwave frequencies. Scientists called the system "practically unjammable." Courier IB could -memorize and transmit wordagc equal to a 50- page newspaper supplement, or the standard version of the King James Bible, in 10 minutes of operation. This is roughly equal to the total message traffic -carried by all existing transatlantic cable and radio links daily. Pacific Stan and Stripes 15 Years OM TOKYO (UPD-The U.S. mil- itary newspaper Pacific Stars and Stripes today celebrated its 15th year of publication for American servicemen and their families sta- tioned- from the 'Philippines to Alastau Tabulations on voting for Yuma area' school districts were made by The Yuma Daily Sun as of 11 a.m. today. The elections were for new members to the school boards of Yuma Union High School, Dis- rict No. 1, Gadsden, -Somerton and Crane. For Uie post at Yuma High School in the contest between Robert J. Moody and Mrs. Cathe- SCHOOL ELECTION Two Yurna.-ffigh; students stroll down the hall of'Snider audi- torium as a. Yuma. resident steps cast his vote in today's school election. Yuma Valley .farmer Bob Moody is seeking to seat on the YTJHS Board while Yuma housewife Catherine Fambrough is seeking brJen till 6 p.m; (Sim-Staff Rockets Hit Gun-Running Cuban Ship GUATEMALA CITY (UPD- Guatemalan.-fighter planes strafed a Cuban schooner suspected of to run guns into Guater mala and drove it away from the Caribbean coast, the government announced today. The ship was said to have run aground, apparently in .'sinking on Mexico's Cozurnel Island. 'An official announcement said the schooner La Cubans was at- tacked "not far from pur but did not say exactly where or when. Cozumel is more than 300 miles north of Guatemala's brief Caribbean coast at -its nearest point. The announcement said ttie sail- ing vessel was attacked at night, and that it managed to escape the full force of the plane's ma- chine gun and rocket attack be- cause of the darkness. It was be- lieved to have been heavily dam- aged. Supervisors Hear Plan For Hangar at Airport A proposal to build a private hangar and office building west ot the terminal building at Yuma County Airport (Vincent Field) was .put before Yuma County Board, of Supervisors yesterday." Supervisors referred the propos- al to the Yuma County Aviation Commission for t recommenda- tion. The .proposal was made by Bet- Ko-Air, Inc., successor to Spain Flying Service. The -principals in Bet-Ko-Air are Lou Loyko and Betty Tank. They appeared before. the Supervisors yesterday, with Peter C. Byrne, attorney. Bei-Ko-Air proposes to lease a piece of unimproved ground on Yuraa-County'Airport, 400 by 420 fret, located 35 feet west of the existing airport FAA towers, which are located west of the existing terminal The firm to-build a structure feet wHe and feet long, not excecdine in height at the highest poiK. This building would include office, sales and reception room, 32 by N feet: a hangar ky M: a service shop, It and a rental tar storaft ipaac, bjr feet. ing would be black-topped and T-, hangars would be built along the west line of the plot for individual- ly owned airplanes. Parking area for EU'OS would be made availa- ble on the premises. The complete area would be fenced with a "cy- ctona" fence. Estimated cost of these improvements is between J60.000 and Byrne said. The firm asks for a 20-year lease with the right to remove the buildings. It offers lo pay per month rent for the first two years, 3 monih for the next three years, and S150 a month for the remaining 15 years. Bct-Ko-Air last month failed to submit a bid on the existing hang- ar and office facilities located at Ihe west end of the airport. The new contract was won by Sky Wil- bur.T operates charter aerv-.ce. The company argues that facilities at Yuma County Airport for civilian ikse have not been de- veloped adequately "and fall woe- fully short when compared with facilities of surrounding cities and tOWM." ngMf yur Supervisors'dug out a planning map of Yuma County Airport which that (he area on both 2 Col. J) County Board Holds 1st lame Duck' Session Yuma County 'Board of Super- visors .gathered yesterday for its first "lame duck" session since, the'.final results of, the Sept. 13th primary election were offically re- ported. Present for the opening of the meeting were four county officials who lost in the Democratic pri- mary 'election. They were M. G. Minikeni- chairman of-the board from'-District 1 who lost to Jim Fuqi'.ay; Glen Srrc-hm, supervisor from District 3 who lost to Rob- ert. K. Nissen; Bill Helm, county attorney who lost to John Mc- Guire in his race for a Superior Court judgeship; 'and Sheriff T. H. (Pete) Newman who lost to Lee E. Echols. Also present were Otis Shipp, supervisor from District 2 Who Faces a Republican opponent, Clarence E. (Sambo) Jones in the Nov. 8th general election; Clerk Robert L. Odom and Madeline L. Spain, county airport manager; and Lyman D. Burtch, superinten- dent of Yuma County Indigent Nursing Home. Aid Guidance Clinic Mrs. Eliza Welch, chairman of Hie Housing Committee of the Yuma County Guidance Clinic, ap- peared to request the use of the maternity wing at the Yuma Coun- ty Indigent Nursing Home. The wing, now vacant, would be used by the Guidance Clinic for its activities four times a week. The Clinic is a non-profit organi- zation whose purpose is to study, diagnose and treat children and adults with emotional problems. A furtlwr purpose is to oducate fam- year, has a budget of J8.815 with which to secure the services of people in guidance Irene M. Phillips is professional work. Mrs. president Supervisors granted the free use of the maternity wing until such time as it might be needed for county purposes. Care of Officials of Parkview Hospital appeared to discuss a' new con- tract with -the -.Supervisors for the care of indigent or-needy patients "who require hospitalization. In the past, these, indigents have been dared for by. Parkview on a con- tract calling .for a flat rate ol per Parkview officials requested a new contract. calling for 550 per day on the grounds .that the aver- age statement to patients at the present time is in" excess of 546 (Continued on Page 2, Col. 4) Light Vote Is Cast In School Election Navy Claims World Jet Speed Record WASHINGTON (UPI) The Navy today claimed a new world record of miles per hour for jet fighter planes. The record would be nearly 100 miles an hour greater than one submitted for recognition by Russia four months ago. -1 Navy Secretary William B. Franke said "we ha.ve shown again that we are equal to any we will be second -i.-. to..hb The Navy mark was set Sept. 25th by'Crndr.1 John F: Davis, an. Annapolis graduate from Chicago, in a McDonnell F4HI Phantom H fighter that will become aboard Navy carriers late this year. Davis flew a 62-mile (100 kilo1 meter) circular course in 40.9 sec- onds. His true average speed was an hour, but he. was occasionally somewhat wide of the course. The test was at an alti- tude of feet over the Mo- jave-.Desert near "Edwards Air Force Base in California. Russia's mark for the' HXMdlo- meter course, submitted .to :the Federation Aerohautique Interna- tionale June 28th aid not yet recognized, was miles per hour. The American record also must be submitted to the same body for recognition. The current official Fambrough, total votes cast were: i'uma High School ..........._...] 16 Administration Building "6 Kofci Ilijili School HI 4! Vista ____..........______37 Crane ..._...........________.....I :u Somerton _______________ 38 (iftclsden ................._.............._. 11 This was a total of 493. District No. 1 tabulations are: Administration HuiWing ..._. 83 Gila Vista ...............................38 Other school tabulations are: (Between Cleo Walker and Mrs. Irene Quammen) Crane 38 Gadsden II Polls close at 6 p.m. today. All county registered voters are en- titled to vote in their own various sohool districts. Kohler Processes Applications for Job Reinstatement KOHLER, Wts. The Kohler .Co., hit by. fee nation's longest labor dispute in history, today processed, applications of former workers for reinstatement to- their- jobs. The workers, -who left their jobs more, than six years .to go on strike against the plumbingware firm, were granted the opportun- ity to seek reinstatement in a de- cision handed 'down' recently by the National Labor Relations Board. A spokesman for the firm, founc guilty of unfair labor practices by the NLRB, said "quite a number' of workers have returned to their jobs since the company began.ac- cepting reinstatement applications But the spokesman said it would be a week or 10 days before the firm knew how many bonafide workers applied to be returned to company payrolls. The workers, members.of the record is miles world per hour set by Brig. Gen. Joseph H. Moore at Edwards last Dec. llth. Davis told a news conference at the Pentagon that his maximum speed on the circular flight was well over miles an 2.3 times the speed at which sound, travels at the altitude. United Auto Workers, went on strike April.5, 1954. -The NLRB handed down its decision 1 a s Aug. 26th, and the strike endec officially a week later when the union applied for reinstatement of workers. Portions of the NLRB decision have been appealed by both the company and, the union. Letters were sent to work ers by the company. But not in eluded in the reinstatement offer were 89 employes whose discharge for misconduct during the strike was upheld by the NLRB. Spokesman Says Reds Will Stay UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (UPI) Soviet Union began racking today in its war with ieerelary-general Dag Hammars- tjold and a spokesman said thera i'as no question of Russia leav- ng the United Nations if he does not resign. The soflenecl Soviet attitude to- vard Hammarskjold came in the ace of repeated General. Assem- bly defeats and thunderous sup- port for the Swedish diplomat who old Premier Nikita Khrushchev Monday "I shall remain at my post." A member of the Soviet delega- tion said the Russian attitude loward Hammarskjold will depend upon his future conduct.. This was a far easier stand than. Khrushchev's demands he resign because the Communist bloc did not trust him. The Soviet spokesman said Kremlin leaders had made no de- cision whether to boycott him as they did to force the resignation of his predecessor, Norway's Trygve Lie. Ask Summit Meeting The delegation member said Russia would, support an.Austra-, [ian amendment to-.a- five-power! neutralist resolution to have it call for a new' Big.Jtour summit meet- ing.-instead of a meeting-between Khrushchev and President Eisen- hower, which' both have rejected. The Communist attack on Han> marskjold waned .in the assembly today and the Ukraine, which is actually a part of the Soviet Union, was- assigned to declare that the secretary-general had "soiled the honor" of the United Nations. This was far. milder than previous Communist-statements. It appeared the Soviet bloc had been surprised by the wild ac- claim 'with''which the assembly delegates greeted Hammarskjold's dramatic defense of himself Mon- day as a protector of: smaller nations. His sps.-ech, interrupted' three times by applause, received the longest ovation any speaker has received in the 2-wcek-old assembly. and the community in gen- ir. order to promote better ilics eral mental health. To date, the Clinic has 32 pa- tients and many more on the wait- ing Jist. Mrs. Welch said. The or- ganization, formed in April of this Otistian Setae Monitor Backs BOSTON (UPI) The Chris- tian Science Monitor today an- nounced it supports Republican Vice President Richard M. Nixon for the presidency. In a lead editorial, the Monitor said, "The Christian Science Mon- itor is an independent newspaper. But we to not equate independ- ence with neutrality.. .and so in 1980 we have concluded that Vice President Nixon is best fitted to fulfill the grave demands of the presidency during thi aext low yum." Toy Cook Claims Assurance He'll Keep Speakership TUCSON Cook D-Cochise said he will be able to retain his post as speaker of the state house of representa- tives. Cook told Lester N. Inskeep of the Arizona Daily Star that he has pledges of 59 of the 79 Demo- cratic nominees.- Coik is unopposed for reelection. But the spenker'-j job is sought by Maricopa county Democratic rep- resentative-elect T. C. Rhodes who does not have opposition in the ;eneral election. Cook said only James Corbet', Jr.. of the Pima county Democrat- ic nominees opposes his reelection bid a.; speaker. Cook added that he wr.nts to organize the house along strictly Democratic party lines. The legislature convenes in January. Ami Cook said he has made no commitments regarding chairman- ships or floor leadership. WGHT THERE! The. surveying crew on Orange Avenue is now finishing up its work preparatory to drawing up plans and specifications for the street widening. This surveyor is getting his mark on the man holding the pole who can be seen through the legs of the tripod. It is planned to widen the avenue from 8th Street to Madison Ave- nue totwttth'of 48feet. Staff THE UNITED WAY   

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