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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: April 22, 1960 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - April 22, 1960, Yuma, Arizona                             1 By JONES OSBORN Revenge is sweet. I've been waiting for it a long, long time. And I know a lot of other news- men who will smile over this one, too. Reporters, being human, make their share of errors, despite ev- ery effort. But they're not ALWAYS wrong. Frequently, a person in the news pops off about something. Then later, when the storm blows up over his remarks, he COULD say: "I wish I hadn't said that. Aft- er further consideration I'd like to make a different statement." But he doesn't. Instead, says: he "I was misquoted." Well, the other day that old po- litical war horse, Harry Truman, popped off in his usual manner. He was holding a news confer- ence. The subject under discussion was the student sit-downs in the South, to end segregation of pub- lic eating facilities. "I don't think they're all stu- said Truman. "I think this was all engineered by the commu- nists." The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People jumped on his remark. They de- manded an apology. And so when reporters asked Truman about his remark, he said: "I was misquoted and I have r.o further comment." But for once the reporters had their proof. Someone had tape-re- corded Harry's speech and the tape' showed that he said exactly what the reporters said he had. It couldn't have happened to a more deserving guy. Helm To Quit As State YD President Bill Helm, Yuma County Dem- ocratic leader, announced today that'he planned to resign as state president of the Young Democrats during the convention in Tucson this 'Weekend. Helm said that since he would be a candidate for re-election county attorney and was also serv- ing as chairman of the Yuma County Democratic Central Com- mittee, that he should ask the state YD convention to elect someone else. Elected in 1958 for a two-year term, Helm's presidency was con- tinued for a third year in 1959 so that the elections would fall on odd numbered years. Others attending the convention will be Mrs. Helm, James Tegart Yuma Young Demo president; Ar- mida Rodriguez, Yuma YD secre- tary-treasurer and C. R. (Ron) McKelvey. Principal speaker at the convention, set for the Santa Rita Hotel, will be Franklin D. Roosevelt Jr. lOc THE 1 i s j AND EL THE WEATHER yvltiTdny 37 Kt 'IVnilH'rature at 11 n.m. today 74 RHntlvc humidity at 11 a.m. 42% hlxll this 83 low this rlntr- m KOBKCAST to Saturday nicM: VnrliiSIf cbudlncjis. windy and cooler thrmiKh Saturday. High today W. low lonlBht M. YUMA 96 12 PAGES PER COPY lOc YUMA ARIZONA, FRIDAY, APRIL 22, I960 PHONE SU 3-3333 ARIZONA 96 Ike Warmly Welcomes DeGaulle Yuma Indians Announce Closing of Reservation 'The Island' Affected by New Order The Ft. Yuma Indians announc- ed today that the reservation would assume a "closed" policy immedi- ately. Plans call for the erecting of toll stations on private roads through the reservation. The dis- puted "Island" area is included in the new policy since it is claim- ed by the Tribe. A public meeting has been called for 1 p.m. Satur- day to explain the new policy. The following is the text of the news release given to The Sun by Tribal leaders: "The Fort Yuma Reservation is the only one in California that has not enforced strict trespassing laws. Many non-Indians have taken advantage of this hospitality and have taken up residence in the Reservation without first obtain- ing a lease or permit. Only on Highways "Under the new policy non- Indians will be obliged to cross the reservation only on the public highways. All private roads are now closed except to Indians of the reservation and those to whom they lease. "This policy applies also to the acres of unalloled Tribal lands. It is unlawful lo cross on to or off the reservation at any place except designated roads through designated toll stations. "The accreted and" LOTS OF seniors enjoying their first and last Senior Ditch Day fill their plates at last night's Riverside Park picnic climaxing the day's events. Today they returned to classrooms in preparation for final exams coming soon. (Sun Staff Photo) 35 Killed in Plane Crash BUNIA, Belgian Congo airliner of the Belgian land area was once thought to be Sobelair Company crashed at surplus. The Indian Bureau asked dawn today on the slope of the to sell it in 1893 and was given a Blue Mountains, killing 35 per- 25 year time in which to dispose of the land and pay tlie proceeds to the Tribe. The Bureau defaulted and since then has failed to rent the land lo produce revenue for the Tribe. Tiiis failure of the Bureau has cost the Tribe millions of dol- lars of income. "Last year the Council withdrew this land from the government and A rescue team from Bunia Air- field climbed to the wreckage and said all Hie 28 passengers and seven crew members died in the crash. All the dead were Belgians ex- cept the captain, Briton Richard Whiteside, 46, and a German girl. Three of the Belgians were has now decided on a rental poli- 1 Catholic missionaries. cy. This includes all land lying in The plane left Brussels Thurs- Druggist Convention Opens Here Sat. Druggists will begin rcgislra- ion at a.m. Saturday in the Stardust Hotel for Ihe Hfilh animal of Ihe I'liarm u'cutieal Association. A champagne breakfast 'ill Sbacklcford will welcome the del- demonslralioii at p.m. French Hero Arrives for 4-Day Visit Coffee wll be served at o'clock followed hy more registra-l lion lime. Afternoon speaker udl he son chairman of ihe Hoard, William S. Merrell Co., start the day at 7 :'M a.m. follow- at 2 p.m. ed by Ihe open session to start al l.ce Kchols, Yuma U.S. cusloms; a great friend to all who love bu- o'clock. Mayor George K. agent, will give a sharp-shooting man ilignily." Kisenhower told the austere WASHINGTON' (ITIi Presi- dent Kiscnhouer today uelromed 1'residcnt Charles Do Gaulle to UK> I'niled Slates as a man "who in war ami peace has proved such A cocktail hour -nil he held by will in- (be pool at followed by a huf- egalcs lo Yuma. The morning meeling lude a message from i.. K. Mel- fi't in the Planet Koom. >y. president of (lie association Chi and Kappa and speeches by .1. Warren Lans-' dnwnc, manager trade rclalions of Kli Lilly Co. and State Sen.; Harold Giss. A men's luncheon is pliumed for 2 noon at .loe Hunt's. The men will return lo Ihe Slardusl al. 1 o'clock for a meeting of drug irn-> velers. Three speeches are plan-' nod for Ihe afternoon: Martin Winlon. president, California Pharmaceutical Association; New- will hold breakfasts at Mon- day morning. Charles Owens, field sales man- ager. Ames Company and John T. MeBean, Glenhrook will deliver talks lo the morning session. The senior class of Col- lege of Pharmacy will be present- ed lo Ibe druggisls by Dean Willis R. Brewer lo finish Ihe morning Wife, Accused of Being Unfaithful, Kills Husband ell Stewart, executive vice prcsi- rent ot the National Phai-maccnl-j An olillimers1 luncheon will be- ical Council and Dr. Hex Call, ad-'gin al .12 noon followed by open ministration department of the discussions on public relations. College of Pharmacy. University of law. professional relations and Arizona. I ethics. Committee reports, rcsolu- Saturday night Ihere will be n.linns Ihe election of officers western parly at Yuma Country) "ill wind up the business of the Club. For golf enthusiasts there willj he a golf lournamonl al. the Conn-i PASADENA, Calif. (UPI) William H. Taft, 38, a distant rel- ative of President Taft, was beat- en to death by his wife after iliey quarrelled bitterly over whether she was faithful, police reported today. Marina 'Taft, 30, pounded her husband's head with a heavy ball- pee.li hammer as he slept Thurs- day in their fashionable, colonial- style home, police said. She then apparently spent several hours iiuo KIV..WUV.O .j ...0 i writing a suicide note before the California side of the Colorado day for Ebsabethville in Ihe Con-1 hi b h .d d River and a small acreage on the It left Cairo Thursday night. Arizona side. The reservation to-; and was coming in for a landing j... cMoc nf HIP r-olrviat Buma it hit Jfount Bor- Durrett Elected Mayor of Bisbee BISBEE (UPI) Paul Durrett yesterday was elected mayor by a large majority in a hotly contested election. Durrett. a grocery store owner, polled 1.221 votes. Lee Culiver got 595. William Bonham -163. City officials said they believed campaigning was fiercer than at any time since 1300. Yuma Demos To Pick Ddeqates to Convention County Attorney Bill- Helm, chairman of the Yuma County Democratic Central Committee, has called a meeting to determine nomination of a delegate and al- ternates lo Ihe Democratic Na- lional Convention this July. The meeting will be held in Su- perior Courl Monday at p.m. Bulletin: zona Republicans will be esked to again operate without a .pistfora this The recomm-' iencation will be by the Pitna P.ep'jblic.ap. iGIub at the state !convention In tomorrow. JThe club also bac- Sen. Berry iGoldwater for day lies on bolh sides of the rado River. The state boundary dispute will have no effect on the Indian title to Ihe area. The states do not own, nor can they transfer :ee to these lands: they will pos- sess only slate sovereignty over the lands that lie within their bor- ders. Since the Reservation is not taxable, very little will be gained by either state. Meeting Called "A meeting of the Tribe has been called for Saturday, at one o'clock at Fort Yuma. The new policy will be explained to mem- of the Tribe and others inler- ested in the use of any particular tract which the Council may put up for lease. "Severe penalties for trespass- ,ng, dumping, hunting, use of fire- arms, or other breaches of the' peace will be explained. A system of permits will be placed in use and toll stations will be erected at designated spots, somewhat like use al federal goro just summit. 300 feet below the Hew Hours Set At Yuma Library Because of repairs being made to the air conditioning equipment, new hours have been set for the Yuma City-County The library will close at 3 p.m. a missile executive with Aerojet General Corp., w a s found dead in his bed still clad in pajamas. His wife was discov- ered in her separate bedroom, near death from loss of blood. She was taken to St. Luke's Hos- pital where her condition today was described as fair. Police were stationed at her room waiting to question her when she has re- gained her slrengd. Quakes Jolt San Diego SAN DIEGO i UPI I-Four sharp earthquakes jolled a large area iof Southern California Thursiiav. Police said Mrs. I aft wrote in windows and dishes but today and open again from 7 to 9 i her six-page note that she apparcnlly causing no damage p.m. Saturday hours will he from out of bed in the middle of the Taft's note said she had been 16 a physician and was told she was not pregnant. The couple in six years of marriage w a s childless. Police said Mrs. Taft wrote lhat Taft accused her of being un- faithful and that a series of quar- rels resulted for several days. Her note left, instructions for dis- posal of their home and asked her parcnls to cancel an order for a new automobile. The couple was found Thursday afternoon by Mrs. Taft's sister. Sue Middlelon. She said she found the Tafts' two cats crying outside to get in the home and she de- cided to investigate. I try Club beginning Sunday morning. at a.m. of US. Moves to Daylight Savings Time Sun. CHICAGO (UPD Daylight savings time goes inlo cffccl for most Americans Sunday, bill il will also turn Ibe United Slates inlo a nnlion divided. Only aboul halt the population moves ils clocks nhcad an hour. Hut praclicnfly everyone feels Ihe cffccls of Ihe lost hour, which is probably why more and move communities now go on fast lime for part of Ibe year. A survey by a walch company (Elgin Nalionnl) s h o w s lhal of Hie estimated U.S. population of 1RO.OOO.OOU will move ip their clocks nl 2 a.m. April This is SO.7 per cent of Ihe The closing ba.HiucI will slart. al liil) p.m. and Ihere will be danc- ing nflcr a presentation of awards. To enable owners and cni- I ployees of Ibe Yuma drugstores to .itlend .the convention of the Ari- Pharmaceutical Association, closing hours for Ihe weekend have been announced. Siilurdny they will close al p.m., Sunday, 1 p.m., and Mon- d.iy, 0 p.m. Stores parlicipaling in Ihe con-1 vcntion include Saul Drugs No. and '2 :Cenlrc. Kronlicr1. Medical! Arts Pharmacy. Sav-On, Uploun. and the Prescription Shop. French general, as Ihe two stood in bright sunshine at Washington Airport that he want- ed lo pay tribute lo "Ihe debt that, the cause of freedom owes to Gen. Gaulle." He Gaulle, snuinling into the sun -as the two faced a colorful honor guard and Ihe rippling flags of the stales of the union, re- sponded that il was with "pro- found satisfaction" Hint he came lo "visit and salule the great American people, dear lo my heart, on whom depend the fate of all the Free World." Crowds Cheer Leaders De Gaulle said he had wanted lo meet with the American Presi- dent, before the Paris summit meeting in May, which be called a "grave inlernalional debate which will lake place in three weeks." De Gaulle, here for a four-day visil, received a rousing and warm welcome not only from Eisenhow- er but from the city of Washing- Ion itself. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. It is expeclcd that regular hours will be re- sumed Momlav. Hedy lamarr Gets Settlement HOUSTON, Tex. (UPD-Aclress Hedy Lamarr dropped her cross- action suit for divorce against oil- which the system parks. 'Only food and certain designat- ed items may be taken into the I reservation by visitors. These con-! trols are necessary to produce revenue from the resources of tiic reservation, and to defray the ex- pense of a survey for anticipated industrial, commercial and resi- dential development. All persons not holding leases approved by the Council, are advised that they may arrange with the Tribal offi- cers for an opportunity to lease, on a first come, first served bas- is." man W. Howard Lee today and reached a property settlement give her roughly n left Ihe way for unconlestcd divorce. night, "got a hammer and hit him over, and over and over." "Forgive me for the terrible Ihing I have done." she wrote, i "I must be out of my mind." I Kcarcd Pregnant Seismologist Fred Robinson the most severe temblor was re- corded at p.m. p.s.l. and had intensity of more than three on the Mcrcali scale of 12. He .said Ihe quakes ranged over a hour period and probably population, a substantial increase the 30 per cent which made the switch a dozen years ayo. Slates going on daylighl time April 2'1. with a few local exi'cp- tions, include: All New England, New York. New .Jersey. Oela ware. Pennsylvania. Illinois. Wis- consin. Nevada. California and Ihe District of Columbia. Minnesota will swine, tn lighl lime under a new law. bui (Continued on Page 12, Col. 5) Hearing Slated April 29th on Re-Channeling The public is invited -to attend a meeting of stale, county and fed- eral officials a week from today on the re-channelizalion of Ihe Colorado River. The meeting will be held at 10 a.m. Friday, April in the of- fice of the Yuma County Board of Supervisors. Tile proposed re-channelization would lake place in the Cibola area, in northern Yuma County. The Bureau of Reclamation has S-IOO.OOO with which lo move a will leave Fisher's LandintT and! dredge from the upper Colorado Yuma Scouts Set Colo. River Cruise Yuma Scouts of the Dcserl Trails Council will lake lo Ihe riv- er Ihis weekend on their annual Colorado River Expedition. Scools will depart from live dif- ferent points on the river. Sonic proceed np Ihe river lo Rlylhe. 1 River lo Ihe Ciholn area, to nc- Olhers wil'l slart from Hlylhe'snl- j complish Ibe work, in-day morning and conic down Tht; proposed route of the re- ibe river lo Fisher's Landing and channelization is now before the Imperial Dam. Still anolber croup Secretary of Interior awaiting his will slnrl from Cibola and come: "PProval. Officials of the Bureau nvn river i lnc' regional office in Boulder Sail, paddle and motor will he Xnv- in Yuma for used this year. Those Scouts sail-' "le meeting. ing or paddling will he competing Yuma County objects to the re- for Ihe 50-milcr trailing award' by Ihe Nalional Council, j "nlc- inly between May 22 ami The trip will be marie in Iwo days route. instead of between April ihe Scouts camping along the [-'j', channelization at Ihis particular nlso Io nc Proposed Police said Airs. Taft wrote m j wcrc jn imperial County 1 and Oct. .10. as most other lasl- j river Saturday nichl and proeeed- the note lhat she had been al- 75 lacked" and had feared she was "pregnant or worse." She apparently referred to a sexual attack by some unknown person, police said. Although she did not give any details, Ihere was no report ever filed with police Lcc j of Mrs. Taft being involved in a rape, police said. Gear Trouble Delays New Yuma Fire Truck Delivery of Yuma's brand new- fire engine was delayed because of mechanical trouble, says Fire Chief Bennie Raebel. Raebcl, together with mechanic Robert Sparks.- left Columbus. Ohio Yuma-bound driving the new engine last week. On the third night of the trip the truck's trans- mission locked in fourth gear. They left it in Tucumcari. N.M., where company mechanics later repaired the vehicle. Raebel expects delivery of the truck sometime next week. State Eagles Gather Here For Weekend Convention Registralion for the Arizona State Convention of the Fraternal Order of Eagles began at J p.m. this afternoon at the Aerie Hall. Plans for this evening include a dinner at the hall starting at 6 dies meeting to be held al Elks Club. JB-------> 'A banquet nt the Aerie Hall will begin at 7 p.m. to be followed by a dance. Election of officers will begin at p.m. followed by a meeting of the ,g a m ,o bc past worthy presidents at i p.m. j hy pasl worthy presidents at S a.m. Busi- at the Coronado Motel, and a I dance starting at 9 p.m. hack at Ihe hall. Saturday's opening ceremonies will begin at 9 a.m. Fletcher, representing Mayor i Shackleford. giving the welcoming address. The morning activities I the distribution of aw; will be introductions and a me- P-m- ness sessions lor 'ho Auxili- aries, a; ;hc KIks Cub and' the Kagles a'. :hc Aerie will round I out the mornms aciiv.ties. The convention will close with awards at 2 morial service at 31 a.m. by the Ladies Auxiliary of Sunnyslope Aerie. Visiting dignitaries from the na- tional Kagles are: Leo Connell. grand worthy vice president; Scl LunJh will be served af 12 noon I ma Todd. grand auxiliary trustee at the San Carlos follower! hy aft- ernoon business sessions and a ia- and Maury Splain, grand aerie membership department. EAGLES GREET group of Eagles greeted their Grand Worthy Vice Pre- sident Leo Connell as he arrived at Yuma County Airport last night. Mr. Connell will represent the national fraternity at the Arizona State convention of the Eagles which started today. Shaking hands with Connell is Bill Lorona. local president. (Sun Staff Photo) THAT'S SHOW BUSINESS is a sparkling, fresh and funny news feature that will give you back- sfage views of the big names from stage, screen, TV, concert hall and recording studio. You ill know IV by the original drawings of the stars. Starts next week on the Entertainment 'age of The Sun   

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