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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: April 10, 1960 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - April 10, 1960, Yuma, Arizona                             Yuma Queen Finalists: Goldsboro, Hulsey, Cannon, John, Linda Miller By JONES OSBORN If you're under 20, you won't even read this. If you're under 30, you won't be- lieve it. But if you're 40 or over, you'll know what I'm talking about. 15c A N D -T'H E'Y UMA'RIZ E N T i N E L PHONE SU 3-3333 ARIZONA 85 Aches and pains. Physically, we start going down- hill just about the time we get old enough to vote. But our decline doesn't usually send us to the doctor until our 40s. In his 50s, a person is apt to be a fairly regular customer at the pharmacy counter. In his 60s, the nurse at the doc- tor's office knows a person by his first, last and middle names his medical history. TUMA, ARIZONA, SUNDAY, APRIL 10, I960 YUMA 85 M Yuma Jr. Livestock Sale Brings By the time a person passes re- tirement age at 65, he has TWICE as many medical bills as anyone else- (The oldster of 65 paid out for doctors, hospitals and medicines .in 1957-5S an average of 5177. But the average for ALL ages that year was only Yet and this is where the rub comes in his earning pow- er is at rock bottom. Chances are he's on Social Security, barely enough to get along. That's what the Forand bill is all about. It would require em- ployers and employes to contri- bute an added payroll tax to fi- nance social security benefits for medical aid to the elderly. It doesn't matter, at this mo- ment, whether I am for or against it. What DOES matter is that there are approximately 16 million per- sons in that over-65 age bracket right now. And 16 million votes are not to be sneezed at. After all, if they all voted, that would amount to 26 per cent of ALL the votes cast for both Stev- enson and Eisenhower four years ago. JThat's one reason -to, -take the Forand bill seriously. Another reason, of course, .is that younger folks don't take care of their parents like they used to. Nixon Bui Brain Trust For Campaign WASHINGTON (UPI1 Vice President Richard M. Nixon, heartened by a poll of his Cali- fornia strength and unshaken by his third-place Wisconsin showing, is building a "brain trust" team for his big presidential push. A source close to Nixon dis- closed Saturday his campaign re- search force is being bolstered by professors of government from universities of Notre Dame and Michigan, by a University of Cal- ifornia administrator, and a re- search director borrowed from Time Magazine. But the Nixon camp made it clear that the unopposed GOP presidential candidate is not. be- ing panicked into any change in his basic plan for a gradual buildup in campaign activity. Nixon leaves for a two-day San Francisco visit Monday. In all. his associates say, he may make as many as 15 speeches in the next three as many o.s one of his Democratic opposite makes in one or two days. They claim the Democrats are not go- ing to set Nixon's campaign pace. Nixon, it was stated, would "rather be ahead in September than in June." 293 Head Auctioned in 5 Hours Yuma County youngsters sold a record 293 head of livestock at a marathon Junior Livestock Auc- tion at the Fairgrounds yesterday afternoon. Future Farmers and 4-Hers gros- sed at the sale which kept Auctioneer Glenn Kenney at the microphone for nearly five hours. See Page 9 for complete, re- sults. SHABRIE ST. JOHN CAROLYN HULSEY Yuma Fair Ends Today The final day of the 1960 Yuma County Fair will be highlighted to- day by crowning of Miss Yuma County. But a full slate of entertainment is on tap for Yumans and fair vis- itors today, including professional stage shows, local talent, and a full day of Yuma County Sher- iff's Posse Horse Show. The siajc show stnris nt p.m. this afternoon, and will include performances by Ethelene's Danc- ers, the Frontier Square Dance Club, the Quechan Band and the Yuma Union High School variety troupe. The horse show starts at 8 a.m. this morning and lasts all day. Kids will perform for the morn- ing, with adult classes competing in the afternoon until 5 p.m. Disarm Parley Agrees To Recess For Six Weeks GENEVA dead locked East-West disannamen conference could agree Saturda only lo recess at the end of thi month for about six ing the arms issue up to the Pari summit conference next month. Wcs'crn delegates feared lh Hie time bclwecn now and th April i? recess date would b taken up primarily with proced ural wrangling and attempts 1 the Soviets to blame the Stales for the latest deadlock r I'.ie 15-year-old postwar issu T'iicro v.as virtually no chance any real arms cut progress at th conference. U.S. delegate Fredrick M. Eaton said- the agreement to re- cess was "mutually acceptable and agreed" between the West and Russian-led nations. Secretary of Stale Christian A. Herter's sug- gestion Friday that the Soviets had first proposed a recess was a misu.n.derst'ncUng, Eaton said. DONNA CANNON [o Crown Queen Tcn Five finalists for Miss Yuma ounty title were named after ompetition at the fair last night. They are Sandy Goldsboro, Car- lyn Hulsey, Donna Cannon. Shar- ie St. John, and Linda Miller. The five will .go through evening 'own, talent, bathing suit, and in- erview judging tonight at S p.m. Miss Yuma County will be rowned by Gov. Paul F a n n i n hen. Selection of five finalists comes ifter four nights of keen compel i- ion for coveted title. Donna Cannon is a 16-year-old YUHS junior, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Cannon. 1912 llih She was sponsored by the 'aycces. Linda Miller is an IS-yonr-nlrl i'UHS senior, daughter of Mr. Mrs. Everett L. Miller. Avenue. She was sponsored iv Yuma Rotary. Sharrie St. John is a 17-year-old iTUHS senior, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Bob St. .John. 2129 25th Place. She was sponsored by C o u n t r y Cousins. Carolyn Hulsey is 17-year-old daughter of Mr. and rs. Harold Hulsey. 615 10th Avenue. The YUHS senior was sponsored by the Yuma Kiwanis Club. Sandy Goldsboro. 17 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Goldsboro. 2065 E. 25th Street, is a senior at YUHS and was spon- sored by the American Legion Post 19. Somerton Future Farmer Jerry Johnson walked away with the big- gest check of the afternoon as the Bruce Church Co. paid 5499.31 for his blue ribbon Brangus steer. Top rrico The lamb division, however, brought the top price per pound. Tom Mee Ranches paid SO cents a pound or 576 for 4-Her Tom Cochran's purple ribbon animal; and -.Nick's .Restaurant paid 73 cents or for Future Farmer Joe Granio's 124-pound purple ribbon winner. Among the beef animals, Yuma Vally 4-Her Polly Johannesen got the top per-pound price of 53 cents. Southwest Meat Company paid 5460.04 for her blue ribbon steer The Bruce Church Ranch led a light field in the race for the big gest spender of the afternoon. The North Gila outfit bought the top priced single animal and a lot o ten white ribbon steers for a tola outlay of Runners-up were the Barklej Ranch which bought a single lo of twelve white ribbon steers for and the Anderson Develop- ment Company which bought five individual steers and a lot of six while ribbon calves for Big Roosters Other big boosters of the sain included the John E. Howe Com- pany which laid out for two prize winning calves and five lambs, and Curtis, Woodman, and Roacli Company which bought I two calves and four lambs for i Neither the sale gross or the spirited bidding reached last year's record total, but the auction main- tained a steady level which kept prices high even in (lie latter stages. Final lambs in the huge red-ribbon classification brought over 50 cents a pound. The total sales were about below the auction when 1-18 animals brought over S-1G.OOO. In the vagaries of the auction, blue ribbon beef topped the prize purple ribbon winners on the hlock. Top sellers among the pur- ple ribbon stock were .Michelle Rice's Angus which went to John Howe for -In cents a pound and Carol Face's Brangus which went to Cirtus, Woodman and Roach for 43 cents a pound. Although prices were not as high. Junior Livestock Committee Chairman Butler said the sale was generally more satisfactory than the Ifl.iJ record breaker. Prices held well in all divisions and the i average profit per youngster was I at an all-time high. child. of Stewart. Religion Question Put to Kennedy By B. ,1. aivFAKLAND United Press International PHOENIX, Ariz. lUPI) John F. Kennedy (D-Mass.) said last night Vice President Richard Nixon appeared to be contradic- tory on his statement today with regard to birth control and the religious question in this year's presidential race. The remarks by the candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination came at a news con- ference at the Phoenix Press Club. A newsman read a dispatch from Washington quoting Nixon as deploring the injection of the re- ligious question into the presiden- tial race, saying such tactics would damage the United States at home, and would "certainly mar the picture of our democratic society we give to those abroad." Kennedy also was advised of Nixon's statement on birlh control in which the vice president ex- pressed belief the United States should give assistance on how to lirnii population growth to other countries if they request such help. Kennedy also was apprised of the vice president's remarks that the forthcoming Dcmocniiii- pr m.'iry in on Strike of Film Actors Settled HOLLYWOOD (UPI) Movie- town's heroes and heroines he- Kan stirring from ihcir enforced leisure Saturday to mark a Hollywood happy ending to t h c actors' strike that crippled- film production at major studios for a month. Tne glamor-ladened stars gear- ed themselves lo resume movie making at most studios Monday following Friday's settlement on the first actors' walkoul in Holly- wood turbulent history. Yuma Names Get Mixed Up with Parker Names A mixup of names has resulted from a story in The Yuma Daily- Sun last Thursday. The story concerned a Mr- and Mrs. Dennis C.allahcr of Parker j being sued for SiO.OOO. Numerous -icrs'ons have confused this name 5m Street, Yunia. j give a more accurate indication of public feelings on the of a Roman Catholic president. Asked if he would care to com meni on these statements. Ken- nedy replied. "No." to loud ap- plause. then he added. "His (Nixon's' first statement seems he contradictory to his lost statement." Kennedy wound up a flying tour through Arizona today in quest of the slate's 17 votes at the Demo- cratic National Convention in Los Angeles in July. He stressed a theme built "n better use of American resources financial and human. rORCKFUl, Jack Kennedy toils umaiis at County Airport: "I wish every congressman and the President could haw bren wilh me on Iho last ten min- ulps of mv fi'mlil into Yuma." Presidrnlial hopeful was amazed al'irrisation network over Wolllon and -Mesa. Ad- ditional Photo page 13.______________________________ at Fair Hundreds Greet Demo Senator A touch and go visit, to Yuma yesterday gave several hundred applauding Yumans a chance to see anil hear Sen. John F. Kenne- dy. Kmbarking from his twin engine Corn-air, the tall youthful Massa- chusetts scnalnr sqiiinlofl at the bright sunshine which brought on high temperature of 101. Saturday. His first words to tin; crowd Con- the Yiimn area. He told cm, "I wish that, every con- and the President Mild have been with me on the st 10 minutes of this flight. Then lose who oppose expenditures for inverting salt water into fresh alor and oppose Reclamation de- clopmenl could see the great lings Hint ;ire being done." Ililall Introduces Introduction nC the senator at ic airport and again at the Star- ust Hotel was done by Rep. tewiirl Udall (D-Ariz.l. Said Mail, "Like most people in Wash- ngton I am convinced you are now going to hear the next presi- dent of the United States." At the airport, the genial sona- lor shook hands with large num- bers of people. He received a good luck charm from Lee Emer- son, chairman of the Yuma Tribal Council and remarked that he would "keep rubbing this for the next few months." The Indian Band was on hand to play at the reception. Yuma Democrats heading the list of greclcrs included Bill Helm, chairman of the Yuma County Democratic Central Com- mittee, Sen. Harold C. Giss: Mrs. Marie Lapulka, president of the Slate Democratic Women; and various local Democratic officials. Nearly 200 At the Stardust Hotel reception, attended by nearly 200 Yumans, Sen. Kennedy met large numbers of people informally. Then he took to the rostrum. He stated that he was in the primaries "because I feel that that is the way presi- dents should he chosen." Kennedy said that he thought the people should have the say as to who the candidates should be and decried selection of candi- dates "in smoke-filled and smog- filled rooms in Los Angeles." Mayor George Shacklcford pre- sented Sen. Kennedy with the key to the citv and urged him "to use it often." From Yuma. Sen. Kennedy flew to Phoenix to wind up a state- wide lour that in Flagstaff early in the morning. The Kenne- dy parly had lunch in Tucson be- fore coming to Yuma. Civi Rights Bill Gets Senate 71-18 New Best Man Is Selected for Armstrong-Jones WASHINGTON 't-'PI' North-: said "it is ern and Southern loaders predicted j wivni. in conscience, we Saturday thai the House would ac- take and wlr.rh we can greet Kennedy Ok's Bracero Deal For Southwest a step had to I jr, Senate amendments proudly as evidence thai America w-'-'tt-n into tTiVTivif rights' "bill. is moving toward the time when ending the marathon battle that j all men. regardless ot their rare, dominated the election year 1 en erl ur color. he treated legion since its outset. equally by the laws." 1'ouse approval of the measure.! LOXDOX IUPP THE WEATHER HiRhcst yesterday 'OJ Ixiwest c'l Avorasc Jiich date Average lo.v this date FORECAST in Monday mttl: Mnstlv clear little chaiice pcraKiro today anrt tomclil: slieMI> oxiler Monday. Expected r.jCh toda> 101; low Monday .morning oi. man for the wedding of Princess Margaret and Anthony Armstrong- Jones was chosen Saturday, amid planning a the May 6 nuptials in Westmin- ster Abbey. Best man number two. as chos- en by Margaret's fiance, was Dr. Roger William Gillian, a 37-year- old neurologist who is the son of the surgeon gynecologist who at- tended Queen FJizabcth during the births of Prince Charles and Princess A new best i While 'llouse for President Kiscn- ivwcr's signature. A major roadblock was cleared Fridav night when the Senate, af- ter Refrigeration Contract is Awarded Ciiy Council awarded Quick Re- weeks of stubborn de-l Cnmpjny of Yuma approved the legislation 71 53.458 contract for improvements of the City-Counly Library' refrig- f> IS. Saturday. Senate Democratic lender Lyndon B. Johnson iTex.l to'd reporters that "1 not think unv thinking person suffers from V.ie illusion that this bill will solve all of our problems." However, he said. "I believe that most Americans will regard this as a step forward." eration system yesterday. Council met in a special session at City Hall. liids were opened at last week's regular meeting and referred to the library board for recommen- dations. Three other Yuma firms submitted bids. Quick Refrigera- tion submitted the lowest.bid. Strong approval and endorsement of the present use of Me.xican Xa- tionals for farm work was voiced by Sen. Jack Kennedy here yes- terday. Speaking to a Yuma Sun repor- ter, the Massachusetts front-run- ner for the Democratic presiden- tial nomination said he felt the "current program was very good." "Sj long as there is an inade- quate supply of labor in your area I feel the con- tract for Mexicans to do farm labor is doing a fine job for your farm economy here, i "Yes. I am strongly in favor of The Mexican National program has been under fire in farm regions of California. The Califor- nia AFL-CIO has, during the past two years, been working to influ- ence repeal of the contract act. They claim the program de- presses farm areas by taking join from domestic workers.   

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