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Yuma Daily Sun: Thursday, July 18, 1957 - Page 1

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - July 18, 1957, Yuma, Arizona                             ly JONES OSBORN Well, they spared Yuma. -The Imaginary enemy in Satur- 1 day's mock attack {flew In across Canada, Irom the ,riorth., A huge super-bomb of 5-megatbn power (equal to 5 .'million tons of TNT) was dropped on Davis-Mon- than AFB outside of Tucson. ;r Another was dropped at Phoenix. Residents had lour hours' warn- ing. And anyone who failed to leave town was considered out by the shattering .blast anc heat of the super-bombs. third, smaller'bomb knockec out Hoover Darn, cutting off elec- tric power and perhaps releasing of..tons of radioactive 'water to the river.) In addition to fie thousands who would die in the Instant the detonation, there is radiation to contend with. Tons of dirt and rubble, suckec up in the vast nuclear fireball to become radioactive, are still .fall ing. In just 20 hours after'the bias deadly fallout would cover an area about 80 .miles by 375 miles, be cause of. prevailing winds. No one could set foot in tha region for one month. And it woul be six months before a person coul return permanently. In such fashion, 100 big Amcr ican cities were destroyed in th' mock attack. Like Hiroshima, mul liplied 100 times over, only mon hideous because we have mor devastating weapons. That is why President Eisenhow er has said that, with nuclca weapons, war can no longer be ai answer to International differences Babes in Arms Unhurt as Two Mothers Killed By UNITED PRESS Two babies being held In arm by their mothers survived h; seeming miracles when deal struck the women, one from i lightning in Florida and th other from an automobile In Mis- sissippi. One child .was thrown, unhurt upon tho top of n car that fatal! injured his mother Wednesday a New Albany, Miss., and the othe child was left unscathed whc lightning Instantly killed his moth cr. 'Mrs. G. C. Wilhile, 23, of Albany, was carrying her 6-month old boy In her arms along a coun try road whon she was struck b the car. She died In a hospita lour hours later. Mrs. Harvey King, 25, of Dad City, Fla., picked up her son Ron aid, and walked into her yard t Inspect an oak tree that had jus been struck by lightning two day ago. A second bolt struck the tree killing Mrs. King. The child fell to the ground be side the mother's body, withou receiving the slightest injury from the bolt. Navy Ship Blast Kills 3, Hurts 8 NEW LONDON, Conn. (UP) A charge of TNT use in experimental work exploded o the deck of the escort vess Somersworth Wednesday nigh killing three sailqrs and injurin eight others, four seriously. The blast occurred' on the for castle deck at p.m. e.d, when .the ship was off Montau Point conducting "test operations with tile "submarine Tirante, th Nav> said. The ship was not dam aged. First indication caused Navy i vcstlgators to believe that a tim fuse on the charge may have bee defective, the Navy said. A boar of officers from the New Londo base began an investigation of 11 accident when the ship arrive here shortly after a.m. e.d Bulletin! U.S. Supreme Master Simon H. Rifkind today 're- fused to accept a i e'vidence frdra Cal- ifornia an histor  Highest yesterday 104 Lowest Temperature'at Jl a.m. today   noons. HlKh today 107. low tonight 60, rtibUsbed Saturday Holiday, at MadisoD luma, by the Sun Prlntlni Co.. entered at Post Otflc. M- rum. Am., as Secona Oasi Man. Annual Subscription lUtw by mall UMA 169 18 PAGES PER COPY lOe YUMA, ARIZONA, THURSDAY, JULY 18, 1957.' PHONE SU 3-3333 ARIZONA 167 Federal Pay Boosts Are Okayed Heavy Rains Wash Out 2 Yuma County Roads HEADS camera catches u section of (he Hi reel light in the foreground. The old build- the old Modestl building at 1st and Main as It Ing wus razed to the ground this morning with topples towards 1st Street. On tho way down It nno workman narrowly missing injury or death ennpiwd tho wire Ural can bo seen lending to wlien a center section of wall collnpscd without wnrnlng. (Sim Staff Photo As Ammonia Gas Leaks RED BUD, HI. (UP) About of the residents here fled their homes today when foul- smelling anhydrous ammonia gas enveloped the town. Twenty-five persons became ill, but none required hospilallzatlonr Tree leaves, grass and garden plants in the northwest portion of the city, where the choking fumes were .concentrated, turned black and' will die. White houses turned brown. The gas escaped when a hose broke as Claude Simpson was fill- ing a tank truck with the ferti- lizer component at his bulk sta- tion. He repaired the leak in about an hour after finding a gas mask. Mayor Waller Schuchmann said the night watchman at the bulk station called to tell of the leak about 5 a.m. Schuchmann turned on the fire siren and let it blast continuously. went to! the town tele- phone switchboard and answered dozens of inquiring calls, warning them to leave town. Police Officer Henry Braun raced up and down the street in the hardest hit section to warn the residents. In 10 to 15 minutes, Schuch- mann said, about three-quarters of the population was on the way out, some on foot and others__in cars and trucks. "Everybody kept Schuchmann said, "I'm proud of the way the town acted in "an emergency." The alert was over about a.m., when wind finally carried away the colorless, heavier than air gas. Miss United States Title is Won by LONG BEACH, Calif. (UP) Leona Gage, a black-haired Cin- derella from Maryland who en- tered the Miss Universe contest with only ?10 in her pocket, Wednesday night won the coveted title of Miss United a The green eyed, long legged Miss Maryland drew cheers from the audience at the Long Beach Municipal Auditorium when she accepted the pearl crown from last year's Miss U.S.A. and Miss Universe, Carol Morris of Iowa. The 21-year-old Leona and her cousin, Barbara Gage, had taken the two-way plane ticket Leona received as Miss Maryland and converted it into two one-way tickets, figuring to work their way back home if she lost. The girls arrived in this seaport with only between them that they had saved from modeling jobs. In Leona's suitcase was a 545 gown she had bought at a sale in Baltimore. She wore 'hat the first night of-the-world-wide beauty pageant. Wednesday night she paraded down the runway in a gown borrowed front a small dress shop in Long Beach. "I went into see if I could buy a dress with our 520 and the man loaned it to knew I was Sedative Works Too Efficiently_______ SYRACUSE, N.Y. Mrs. Doris Camerata followed doctor's orders Wednesday__and.-took a sedative to relax and calm her nerves. She got so calm a burglar walked in, stole J157 worth of val- uables and walked out, without disturbing her at she said .witii an embar- rassed smile. But now riches have come at last to Leona. The prizes include cash, a world-wide tour, a complete wardrobe, a housetrail- er, and she will represent the contest in Europe. McKay Gets Job WASHINGTON (UP) Presi- dent Eisenhower today appointed former Interior Secretary Doug- las McKay to a a year job as commissioner on the U.S.-Ca- nadian International Joint Com- mission. McKay, now living in Salem, Ore., will succeed Lee Jordan who is resigning. Each country has three members on the joinl commission. McKay resigned from his inter- ior post last year to rim cessfully for the seat of Sen. Wayne Morse The joint commission, which he will join at headquarters here, has jurisdiction over oil bound- ary waters questions between this country and Canada. Adm. Dufek Replaces Byrd in Polar Post WASHINGTON Presi- dent Eisenhower has named re- tired Rear Adm. George Dufek, a veteran Polar explorer, to re- place the late Adm. Richard E. Byrd as supervisor pf the Ameri- can South Polar programs. Heaviest Rain In State Falls At Salome, 1.67 Four highways in Arizona, in- cluding two in Yuma County were closed yesterday as the force of summer storms struck throughout the state. More of the same was predicted today. The local forecast was for scattered thundershowers most- ly -over-the-nearby-mountains this afternoon or evening. The shower activity was wide- spread yesterday. In Yuma County water in dips closed Highway 72, between Hope and Parker, and Stale Route 95, between Quarte- site and Yuma. Highway 95 was reported to have been reopened this morning, but motorists are urged to proceed cautiously since water has piled up sand in the dips. Highways Closed Other highways closed because of the same conditions were Highway 387 between Chandler and Casa Grande, and State .Route 93, link- ing Kingman and Congress. The heaviest rain fall in the state was 1.67 of an Inch at Salome. At Phosnix streets were flooded and numerous trees felled by light- ning as .58 of an inch was record- ed. One canal burst at Phoenix because of the overload, but no major damage was reported. The bridge of a new portion of also had .to, b'iT p'a'troJ said traffic was routed along the Coolidge dam leg of the highway. At Tucson Tucson had gusts of wind up to 50 miles per hour yesterday after- noon, and there were reports of more than an inch of precipitation at outlying points. Here are some precipitation fig- ures for the 24 hours ending at n m. today: ___ Rosseliini Bedridden With Asiatic W NEW DELHI (UP) Italian film producer Roberto Rosseliini was still bed-ridden and "very weak" today with influenza. Rosseliini, husband of Ingrid Bergman and romantically linked with a beautiful Indian script writer, told United Press today: "I am running a temperature and am very weak. I am ill and at the present I am allowing no vis- itors." Close associates said it will be "some time" before he can leave New Delhi. He' was reported scheduled to go'to Bombay where Mrs.--Sonttli-Das the script writer, is living at the moment. Death Takes 2 Tucson Pioneers TUCSON well-known Tttcsonans died yesterday. Helen Scholefield Brodie, a na- tive of the Southern Arizona city -and for 34 years an employe o Pima County, died at the age of 71. Mrs. CallieJBarkley Vinson, 82 former Tucson City treasurer also died yesterday. She came to Ari- zona in 1S87 with other members of her family. Funeral services ;or Mrs. Vinson will be held Friday morning. Cigarettes Blamed for Lung Cancer -WASHINGTON (UP) An American Cancer Society expert told congressional investigators today that cigarette smoking is a cause lung cancer and has a "severe effect" on a number of other diseases. Dr. E. Cuyler Hammond, the society's research director, said "evidence that smoking is a seri- ous he'olth hazard has been ac- cumulating slowly since about 1015." He said recent s-ttidies have produced "over-whelming" evi- dence that cigarette smoking "is a causative factor of great im- portance in tho occurrence of lung cancer." He taid tbers bai been an "alarming trend in the death rates from lung with the number of deaths rising from 1930 to an estimated 000 in 1956. Hammond said cigarette smok- ing "causes an increase in deaths from heart disease and has a "severe effect" on patients with peptic ulcers and Buerger's disease. He also said "there is evidence that smoking has an effect on death rates from respiratory dis- eases other than lung cancer." Hammond -was the opening wit- ness at a House Government Op- erations Subcommittee investiga- tion of filter cigarettes. Earlier, Rep. Irit F. BJitsh Ga.) said Subcommittee Chairman John Blatnik (D-Minn.) had as- sured her that he is for the tobac- co growers and has no wish to penalize them in any way. Mrs. Blitch said Blatnik told her his subcommittee hearings are not in- tended to effect tobacco price sup- ports. Sen. Richard L. Neuberger (D- Ore.) Wednesday introduced a bill that would cut off farm price sup- ports and soil bank payments to tobacco growers. Neuberger, a nonsmpker, said it was ridiculous for-the government to-warn-Amer- icans about alleged dangers of smoking while spending millions of dollars to supjjort tobacco grow- ing, An Agriculture Department spok- esman called Neuberger's bill "completely unrealistic." "If we penalize tobacco because oC a possible health danger, are we going to penalize corn because we make bourbon whiskey out of that he said. Blatnik said his subcommittee hopes to determine during six days of hearings whether the pub- lic is "being fooled" about the protection afforded to smokers by "filters." He said the subcommittee wants to determine whether manufac- turers have made "false and mis- leading advertising" about filler cigarettes and; i{ so, why federal agencies haven't cracked down. California Engineer Blasts Arizona Books By VJ5KNOJT BAKER United Tress Staff Correspondent SAN .FRANCISCO (UP) A California hydrographic engineer spent the full session of the Col- orado River water suit Wednesday going over Arizona's red one, a white one and a blue one.. Witness Clayburn Elder opened lis attack on two Arizona docu- ments, the "White Book" and the 'Blue Book." Both include Bureau of Reclamation compilations of water supply of the Gila River, a Syrian Troops Reinforced on Israeli Border BEIRUT, Lebanon High- ways leading to the tense. Syria- Israeli border are clogged with Syrian troop reinforcements mov- ing Into the area, reliable sources said today. Syria also was re- ported to have cancelled all army leaves. The same sources quoted Syrian army officers as saying Israel had massed artillery and men 'at its border with Syria and in the demilitarized zones where Israel used tanks last week against Syr- ian guns in a ten-hour border bat- tle. A report from Damascus said an army alert was declared in Syria at start of the troop movements but it was not established here whether the alert was regional or .nationwide. The Damascus reports said the Syrian government attitude was to expect (lie Israeli not to he caught un- prepared it a major attack comes. Colorado tributary. He told Special Supreme Court Master Simon RiJkind that he bund "discrepancies (in the Blue Book) that would drive a water- master crazy if he had to enforce decree on them." Elder testified that the White Book carried "more weight" than the Blue Book, in his opinion. He also stated that the Blue 3ook book upon which Arizona based a subsequent document- called Book" an "unworkable" method of calculating virgin flow of the Gila. The Red Book was data com- piled by the U. S. Bureau of Rec- lamation upon which Arizona based its needs for the proposed Central Arizona Project. Elder said the "inflownDUtflow" formula, which was compiled by Arizona engineer R. J. Tipton, was taken from a method used and later proved unworkable in the upper basin states. He testified that the upper basin used 26 measuring stations for their formula, "which proved in Tipton used only one. Army Plans Second Cut WASHINGTON sources said today the Army ex- pects to make a second cut in its strength possibly by next June. The new cut plus the cut ordered this week would re- duce tho Army to the same strength as the Air Force will have at that time. The Army announced Wednes- day night that it will trim its monthly draft calls as a result of the first cut. It said it could not say at this time how much the draft calls will be re- duced. Yuma Bar Owner Fined A Yuma bar owner has paid a 5100 fine in Yuma Justice Cour for selling liquor to a minor. Carmelita Mayhcw paid the fini to Judge Ersel Byrd yesterday through her attorney, Glenn Cop- pie. The complaint had been sign ed June-22nd by James Daly, pro- bation officer, charging Mrs. May hew with selling spirituous liquor to Diego Medina, 17. Also in Justice Court, Leonart Dobbins, 50, was charged with a high misdemeanor, second of fense drunk driving and reckless driving. The complaint, signed by Police Patrolman Xeltli Weslgate charged thnt Dobbins was drunk driving Sunday night when h e had an- accident. It also allegec that lie was found guilty in City Police Court on Oct. 14, 1956 on the same charge. Bond on Dobbins was set at ?GOO and the case continued' until Fri day for trial setting. In Superior Court, Clifton Ear Ferrell, 22, charged with assaul with a deadly weapon, impo sition of his sentence postponed for two years by Judge-Henry-G-Kel ly. Ferrell was charged with at tacking Shelby Conrierly with kitchen paring knife. Judge Kelli placed Ferrell on the two-y ear probation on the conditions that hi secure a job, slop drinking and vis iting saloons and break no laws. Committees OK Increases for Civil Servants WASHINGTON OJP) congressional committees, over- riding President Eisenhower's op- position, voted today in favor of )ay increases for the govern- ment's civil servants. In developments on both sides of the Capitol: House Post___0ffice__and Civil Service Committee approved pay boosts totalling 530 million dollars a year for the clas- sified civil service workers. Senate 'Post' Office and Civil Service Committee favored 3-11 million dollar annual in- crease to the same federal em- ployes. The President has argued against this and other- federal pay increase proposals on grounds they would aggravate the inflation. Together Ihe two increases would add about 850 million dol- lars a year to the cost ol running the' government. Other congressional news: School aid: The House Rules Committee cleared the federal school aid bill for a voto by the House. Speaker Sam Rayburn said the long delayed measure prob- ably will be called up for action next Wednesday. The bill would authorize In school construction aid over five years. President Eisenhower has repeat- edly called for federal aid to schools, but most congressional leaders doubt the measure will pass the House. Cabaret tax: The House Ways and Means Committee .voted to cut the 20 per cent cabaret tax in half. The Treasury opposes the cut, which would cost it about 21 million dollars a year in revenue. Professional-musicians lobbied for the reduction. They tax for the closing of many hotel entertainment rooms. Civil rights: Senate Republican Leader William F. Knowland said advocates of President Eisenhow- er's controversial civil rights are ready to make some concessions to southern opponents. He declined to be specific. Foreign aid: Death of a mem- ber put off a showdown vote in the House on President Eisenhow- er's .appeal for restoralion of a tentatively approved 200 million dollar cut in foreign aid. Flu Epidemic Hits in Baghdad BAGHDAD, Iraq (UP) The day that Asian flu has hit victims in Baghdad. Five hospi- tals are operating special depart- exclusively for handling Ihe disease and nil public recreation spots have been closed to halt the epidemic. HOUSE on tho iflof anil on tho ground fought a flro in a shinll limisft nl 1st Strrct Wednesday p.m. Tho liwisp, occupied by Pedro Grijalvn, was nlmnal a fnlnl loss with damage estimated at Yuma Fire Department pumpers were right lltn blnzfl Hint had most'or the house In- volved' br-rnre Hrcmo.n arrived! It starlet! from' tlove on an open porch. (Sun Pbotojf   

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