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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: September 20, 1956 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - September 20, 1956, Yuma, Arizona                             By JONES OSBORN Editor's Jones Osborn i s on a brief vacation and will re- sume liis daily column in this space upon return. Adlai Maps Counter- Attack WASHINGTON E. Stevenson mapped ;i counte at- tack today against the Republican project of following up Democrat- ic campaigners with "truth squads." Stevenson's p r e s s secretary, Clayton Fritciiey, said the Demo- cratic presidential nominee would have "a few well chosen remarks" to make on the subject in a speech tonight at nearby Silver Springs, Md. He said Stevenson remarked to his staff that "It is significant the. Republicans can make page one headlines by promising to tell the truth." j Stevenson will spend the dayj putting the finishing touches to the speech, conferring with- and working on a series of papers he will issue hitting specific cam-! paign topics. Fritchey Wednesday revealed Stevenson's plans to hand down formal papers from time 10 time in the seven weeks before the election. Each will cover a single THE SUN s f f 111 AND-THE-'YUMA'A'RI Weather Forecast Il.iKhest yesterday Lowest Temperature at 11 a.m. today Relative humlditv at 11 a in Average lilch this ,iaU' Averase low tills dale FOIIKCAST to Friday nlsl.l; Clear torta; 77 mi 7J TINEL t I-uljlisued dally except Salarday HoUdayi at MadliOB Ave., luma, by tho Sun Printing Co., entered at tbo Post Office at Yuma, as Clas. matter. Annual Subscription Rate: by mall 224 22 PAGES PER COPY 7c YUMA, ARIZONA, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1956 PHONE SU 3-3333 ARIZONA 224 Dulles Suez Users Plan Okayed FHA Slashes Down Payment and Interest Kates Ike's Health Seen as Campaign Main Issue subject. Two such "policy statements" now are in the works, Fritchey said. One will cover the problems of the nation's old-.people, and the iither will be devoted to schools. Frilehey said these papers will differ from campaign speeches in that they will center on "positive aspects" of his program and go into problems in "much more de- tail and depth than is possible in a political talk." Stevenson sent a telephone mes- sage Wednesday to the United Sleelworkers convention at Los Angeles, criticizing Republicans for claiming credit for increasing the minimum Wage to SI an hour. Stevenson said he was "disgust- ed" by these claims because a Democratic Congress enacted the SI minimum "over the expressed .WASHINGTON It was back there in July at the Panama conference that President Eisen- hower told Senorita Carmen H. Remon that he didn't have much strength but just kept on going. It was merely a casual remark to a well wisher, the sister of the your will." never have accepted renomination to this office.' "I hope this conviction this peace of bring assur ance to many others, as I stand ready to serve as your president for another four years, if this be objections" hower. of President Eisen Swift and Co. Workers Strike In 26 States CHICAGO and Co was hit early today by a strike o some workers in 26 states when llth hour negotiations to avert a walkout were "broken off." The strike was called by offi- cials of the United Packinghouse Workers and the Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Work- men of America. Eastern Swift plants were first idled when union members left their jobs at midnight EOT. An hour later about 500 pickets formed around the meat packing firm's main yards in Chicago where about 4.000 workers were on strike. Picketing was reported or- derly. The collapse of negotiations was announced by a spokesman for the Federal Mediation Service, who said contract talks were broken off at 1 a.m. EOT without a settle- ment. Affected by the strike were 40 Swift plants across the nation. The strike was the first against a major meat packer since 19-18. The unions' wage demands called for a "substantial" increase to boost packinghouse pay to the level earned by steelworkers. Ba- sic wage in meat packing plants now was SI.69 an hour while steel- workers get an hour. Marilyn Monroe To Meet Queen LONDON Monroe will meet the queen, it was an- nounced today. She will be among movie stars presented to Queen Elizabeth H on Oct. 29 at the royal film per- formance. late Jose Remon, a former presi dent of Panama. "You're looking fine." says she or some such thing as that and back came Mr. Eisenhower will a comment about his physica condition which considerabl; jarred Republican Party strate gists. That casual remark and Mr. Ei senhower's hospitalization lor sur gery earlier this year have com bined to renew the matter of his health as a prime issue in the 1956 presidential campaign. The President and his advisers' evi- dently are aware of the political fact. His televised and broadcast ad- dress Wednesday night from the White House properly can be de- scribed as the beginning of his personal appeal for very important occasion. Mr. Ei- senhower felt it was necessary to deal Wednesday night with the is- sue of hrs health before he could proceed to other discussion with the voters. Says He Is Confident This is what he said: "Let me begin with a very per- sonal matter. It is a personal kind of peace that I possess granted to me by the mercy of the Al- mighty. "It is this firm conviction: I am confident of my own physical strength to meet nil the responsi- bilities of the presidency, today and in the years just ahead. II I were not so convinced, I would Driver Gets 90 Days on Two Charges A 20-year-old man was sentenced to 90 days in jail this morning on charges of drunk driving and reck- less driving. Edward R. Bridschge, 20, of ihe Vincent AFB, was sentenced to jail by Police Judge Linwood Perkins. He was involved in an accident on 4th Avenue last Saturday. Theodore Bender, 47. of 272 Mad- son Avenue was sentenced to a i25 fine or five days :n jail for disturbing the peace. In Yuma Justice Court, two wo- men were given 90-day suspended sentences for vagrancy. Arrested near Roll by Deputy Cliff Brown vere Essie B. Page, 25, and Adell Villiams, 31. Justice of the Peace ilrsel Byrd gave them suspended entences when they agreed to eave this area. Democratic strategy is not to challenge most of what Mr. Ei- senhower told the staters Wednes- day night about his health. Adlai E. Stevenson, Sen. Estes Kefauver and other top Democrats will hole that Mr. Eisenho- wer will be around four years hence duffing away at golf, as usual. Photo Clue Found in Girl's Death TIJUANA, Mex photo- graph of two sailors and an ex- pectant mother, whose body was found partially buried near here, ,vas the best hope today for solv- ing her mysterious death. Police sought to identify the sailors to find out what brought the victim, JTrs. Bonnie Ann Head 20, from a San Diego home for unwed mothers to Ti- juana. The photograph was taken by a barroom photographer early in he morning of Sept. 6, a day af- er Mrs. Leaverton, a divorcee, eft the Door of Hope Home to go shopping. The photographer remembered aking the woman's picture after a Mexican worker found her nude body Tuesday partially buried in i field near the Tijuana-Tecate lighway. Mrs. Leaverton's wallet, clothes ind the photograph were found lidden under rocks near where he body was discovered. 15 Tracts Yuma Mesa Land Sell For Land buyers laid out 192.45 for 162.33 acres of Yuma Mesa land sold this morning at public auction by the U.S. Bu- reau of Reclamation. The 15 tracts are located be- tween County 15th and 18th Streets in the vicinity of an ex- tension of Avenue A. Largest amount paid for a sin- gle tract was which F. A. Beck, of Anaheim, Calif., paid for 22.16 .vcres. The lar- gest amount per acre was offer- ed by H. T. I.eo, also of Ana- heim. He paid S900 per acre for 8.32 acres. 4 Moves Aimed At Bolstering Home Building WASHINGTON iVP) The White House today announced four new- government actions designed to strengthen the home building industry and make it easier to buy low cost homes. The actions reduced the down- payment requirements for FIIA- insured homes costing no more than S9000 from 7 to 5 per cent, eased mortgage sale requirements to make mortgage money more easily available, and relaxed the borrowing limits of members of the Home Loan Bank System to met the, heavier demands for mortgages. Housing Administrator Albert M. Cole said the actions "will be of particular benefit to home buy- ers of modest means" and wiU 'raise the level" of housing con- struction in the nation. The action was taken by govern- ment home financing agencies in response to President Eisenhow- er's request for a review of hous- ng credit needs "in the United States. The actions followed strong com- ilaints from the housing industry that the government's hard money Mlicies are holding down home onsU'uciion across the nation., 'hey said would-be home owners and builders in many areas are aving trouble arranging most iages because of "right money" iruations and higher interest rates. Government statistics show that omes are now being built at the ate of 1.1 million a year, com- ared to 1.3 million starts in 1955. Today's White House statement aid extraordinary demands for housing credit are pinching the supply of funds to home builders and home buyers. This condition, if continued, would restrict home construction, adversely affect the small builder and the home purch- aser of modest means, the state- men! said. It added that difficul- ties also -would be created for small businessmen in the lumber and other building supply indus- tries. HERE TO STAY Clarence DeCorse and Harold Nelson, two post office employees, install new hall point pens on the desk at the poster- fioe. The pens, which arc attached to a metal plate by a chain, are marked "US Government Property" and Fostuiuster Eleunor McCoy stressed the point that pilferage of the pens carries a penalty of fSOfl, one year in prison or both. DeCorso is superintendent of malls and Kelson a post office clerk. (Sun Shift Bonelli Surrender Deal Rejected by Morrison Store Clerk Wounded by Crossbow Coast Burglary Suspect Nabbed At Winterhaven A burglary suspect from El Ca- jon was arrested by Winterhaven officers last night on the Califor- nia side of the bridge. The suspect, Winston Leon Car- ter, 21, gave no resistance al- though he was known to be armed and a .32 automatic was found !n the car. Arresting officers were Deputies Tip Atkins and Paul Menta and Highway Patrolman Bill Fradenburg and Terry Mit- chell. Carter was returned to El Cajon ast night. Bulletin! [of the [the night It-: I'lided': w i th Ari- jilr.ea, Doria ta.sti- jfied today before IRef ere'e >Bff '-kind that the-aan, [at the wheel -had [the ..reputation -of being i-ra'ore' Inter-] eat e'd i in s urround-i ing the compass H66. is 5rd Mate-C'ar- -j ,a.fc one Jphan a, en Ike Opens Campaign by Citing GOP Progress without Precedent Record PHOENIX state at- torney general's office today re- fused to "make a deal" for the surrender of former California Board of Equalization member William G. Bonelli without Uie ap- proval of San Diego County of- ficials. Bonelli, who disappeared from his Kingman. Ariz., ranch about a month ago, offered his surren- der terms Wednesday through at- torney Joseph W. Morgan. Meanwhile, Mohave County Su- perior Judge Charles Elmer, who in February denied Bonelli a writ of habeas corpus but permitted him to go free without bond pend- ing appeal, said he believed the former California official might 3e in Mexico. Elmer said also he had issued an order to Bonelli Wednesday de- manding his surrender. Elmer said the order had been transmitted to Bonelli's son, Rob- J, ert, at Phoenix. The judge said WASHINGTON President Eisenhower carried his re-election fight into the crucial midwest farm belt today. He opened his nationwide campaign here Wednesday night on a Republican record of "progress without prec- edent." Mr. Eisenhower will spend this afternoon and most of Friday in Iowa, following tip on his belief that government policies to meet farm problems must be tailored to peacetime conditions and "not the policies of the past that ap- plied only to ihe demands of war- lime." The Chief First Lady Executive and the were scheduled to leave by plane this afternoon for DCS Moincs. A motorcade will toko (hem to Boone where they will spoiul Ihe In the house onco occupied by Mis. Eisenhow- er's grandmother Mini father. The Bounc home is nuw the of Mrs. Eisenhower's uncle, Joel Carlson. The president Friday will attend the national plowing contest at Newton, Iowa. He planned to make a speech at the DCS Moines Airport during the late afternoon before taking off for the return flight to Washington. Three Central Themes Mr. Eisenhower has been mak- ing political statmcnts of various lengths since his renommation, but Wednesday night's speech was his 195G campaign debut on na- tionwide television and radio. He concentrated on three cen- tral (homos: The domestic economy has im- proved vaslly under his adminis- tration. The effort For world pence sinco Ihu Republicans took over in .195.1 has'been sucnssl'til to Ibo degree that "mil ti single nation has been surremlerc'j to uggrcssian.'' And, in an obvious shot at the Democrats, he opposed "any the- atrical national gesture" such as stopping American H-bomb tests or ending the military draft. Mr. Eisenho'wer made a special point of his own health, saying he was firmly convinced of "my own physical strength to meet nil the responsibilities of the presidency today, and in Ihe years jusi abend." "I hope this conviction this peace of mind may bring as- surance to ninny others, as I stand ready in serve as your pres- ident for another fgtir years, if this he your will." fiuvo Suher Apprulsul Mr. Eisenhower's formal cam- paign opener .vas no shower of political fireworks. For the most part, n sober-voiced ap- pniisiil of his ndiiilnislrnllon pro- on Page 8, Col, 1) Insecticide Deaths Bring State Meet PHOENIX tin-Three cases of poisoning from parathion insecti- cide, two fatal, had repercussions, today on the stale level. At an emergency meeting Wed- nesday, the Arizona Board of Pest Control Applicators was asked to review all licensed applicators to determine whether ihey are perly equipped to handle the high- ly toxic insecticides. The State Board of Iho Arizona Farm Bureau, attending the meet- ing, also recommended Ihe Board of Pest Control Applicators issm special certificates to those quali- fied to handle the poisons, nnd that a study be made of a regis.1 ration system for farmers buying toxic materials. that if Bonelli "gets it, he'll LOS ANGEL! cossboiv, a weap The lawyer, who past, was used Bonelli in his fight to avoid by a mysterious tradition to Califonia on an wounded liquor s dictment on conspiracy to E. Allen, 20. state election laws charges, said he felt sure his client would surrender if Bonelli's extradition appeal was reinstated in the Arizona Supreme Court and if a "reasonable" bond was IG-inch arrow with wide tip was fired tli back entrance of the struck Allen below shoulder blade, puncturi victim, found lyir California Approval was taken to May Arizona Atty. Gen. Robert where he was give rison said no deal for surrender could be made without the approval of California authorities. He doubted that the officers f crossbow, cocked and 1 official's appeal to the state Supreme Court could be a hedge in the nei box containing four Bonelli's appeal was denied by the high court W e d n e s d a v arrows was the weapon. grounds that Bonelli had a .fugitive from justice. He was ordered arrested Aug. 20 but Demo missing when officers called at lis Is Chain The order to imprison came after San Diego County change of time and Atty. Don Keller charged that the. 'he Democratic fugitive' was planning to flee was announced lot country and go to South precinct commitic to escape at 7 p. m. in th In a letter 10 iMohave Count in the bascim Sheriff Frank Porter, Bonelli The change he dropped from sigiu because to Ihe football game reports that Keller planned to Republicans will nap him ar.d return him to election of officers in the Superior G ES >on out o Wednesda, store cler! through thi store an his righ ig on the a blooi found the be- Friday Association Will Use Its Own Ship Pilots LONDON -TO- The Big Three won majority support at the sec- ond Suez conference tonight for a Canal Users Association with its own ship pilots. The decision to provide its own pilots was agreed on after a war- ning that some western ships would refuse to let Egypt put "hostile" pilots aboard to trans- mit the canal. Spokesmen for the United Stales, Britain and France said a majority of the delegations at the 18-power conference accepted Secretary of State Jolm Foster Dulles' blueprint for a "coopera- tive association of Suez Canal us- ers." But the conference put off u n- til tomorrow a decision on the pro- blem of how to align the associ- ation with the United Nation. This was an issue that cost the west support from Pakistan, Swe- den and Denmark. A high Western source said tiie 18-nation London conference is expected to end Friday with ndoption of a "draft resolution or charier" which delegates will take Jack to their governments for fi- nal decisions. The source said it might take two weeks to get the association n business after approved by the various governments and it would ic the middle of October before .he plan could go into effect. Of- .icials believed Egyptian opera- Jon of the canal might run into trouble by then. Legal and technical experts ent to work today on the terms of the charter. Their assignment vas to frame a compromise on the original association plan to make t acceptable to the neutral na- ions. No Definite Deadline The committee of experts was ormed at this morning's session. At the afternoon session the ex- icrts reported back to the full onferencc on the work they had one. Foreign ministers of the IS arions waited nearly half an hour or lire committee session to wind lhr> S.P. To Sell Air Lines Tickeis SAN FRANCISCO (UPI-.South- ern Pacific Railroad will sell Unit- ed Air Lines passenger tickets in about 1.10 rail station ticket offices in California, Oregon and Nevada stur.iiiu; Oct. t. two firms sniil Ihe Fleeing Bandit Caught By Unarmed Officer FAYKTTEVILLE, N.C. An unljcky bandil who hold up a Chinese laundry Wednesday, was chased by a posse of passing mot- a passing train and Parker hopped out and hid in bushes along the railroad tracks. The pursuing cars arrived and a crowd of citizens orUts and bluffed into surrender) and police officers moved in. by ;-n unannc'.l traffic officer. The Police said the robber. Oscie! cars policemen deployed behind with drawn guns. An un- Parker, 21, Inplewood. Calif..; armed traffic officer, wa-- identified as me man who Davis, spotted Parker behind a two other armed robberies i hush ind ordered him to "come Lumhcrlon recently. ;out with your hands up." Parker Parker entered Ihe Chinese j meekly handed the loaded pistol inilry armed with a pistol and to Davis. Bow Quan of Parker, who was discharged (lushed from the l.-iumlry with a from the Army last month, was Ex-Arizonan Can't tand LA. Smog So Ends Life LOS ANGELES iff. A 63- enr-old man shot himself to eath Wednesday afior leaving a ole declaring that he couldn't and IXK Angeles fumes ny longer, police reported. Oflicers said Albion Nelson fired .22-caliber bullet into his head the bathroom of his home. A >te to his wife, Sigrid. 55. de- clared "I'm tired of sir.os can't take it any more. Cash in and move out where there is fresh air." Mrs. Nelson said she and her husband moved here recently from -Phoenix. She said her band found the change in ai rdfi- band found the change in air dif- ficult to accept. Negro employe and Bow (Juan hot on nls heels. He waved several charged with ..rmed robbery and four counts of assault with a pi'deslriims from n nearby taxi (deadly weapon. Police said Parkoi stand with his pistol .ind com i-1 was identified as the man who in; nderud Pivslon Oliver's tiixi-jheld up a used car salesman and with Ihe order "Let's go bud-hook- a car in Lumerlon Wednes- fly, I've gol n gun." The taxi drove iiwny but n half tt'ouid bo sold by .SI' in sliilionsl piissinj; cars, iiltrnclccl by where Uiiilod hits no ticket offices.' How Qtuin, chased It They will not. lip sold by SP some III blocks of downtown Kiiy- in larger cliics. 'ettcville. The Uixi WM blocked by d.'iy, :ind hold up an anliijuc shop in Ihe same town Scpl. 8. Before entering !hi? Army, Park- er was sentenced to two years In federal prison for larceny of mi auto in Columbia, S.C. Fifrh Mulford Winsor Adds To Name Line The line of Mulford Winsor has extended to the fifth generation. Naming the first grandson of Mulford Winsor Jr., city eit- ginror, sort of conhises (lie Mulford Winsor Miuatiiw. His birth last Saturday nnd naming of JUulford Mm tlm fifth in lire, Tho lii'M Miih'nrtl Win in r in now dead. The seeor.il is Mato librarian and was a Viitniin for many Tho third our city tjiiginocr. Tho fourth at Ajo whoro 1m manures tlio local thwilrn. When Urn Jailor's wiftt ffiivo folrth to thctr first son last Saturday, IHVUIW tlm filth, fifl Itus four M   

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