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Yuma Daily Sun: Thursday, March 22, 1956 - Page 1

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - March 22, 1956, Yuma, Arizona                             0 THE EDITOR'S NOTEBOOK Someone's always saying, "If: later than you think." In tliis case, they're wrong. I is now TOO. late. Too late, that is, to make any sensible change in our method o electing a President, this year. We will do it by the Electora: College, as always. A stale is allotted as many votes as it has U.S. senators and rep: resentatives. For example, New York state with 2 senators and 43 represent- atives is allotted 45 votes in the Electoral College. Arizona, with 2 senators and 2 representatives, has only 4 votes When the people vote in Novem- ber, they vote for Electoral Col- lege members. The party which gets the most votes in November, gets ALL the Electoral College votes in that state. For instance, let's say Steven- son should win New York state by a very narrow margin maybe just votes. Regardless ol the margin, Stev- enson would get all 45 delegates. Then in Arizona, Eisenhower might win by votes. And get 4 delegates. You see what could happen. One man could receive the greatest popular vote, but get fewer dele- gates to the Electoral Colleg where it really counts. Printed Hiursday Afternoon Mr Batnrdir HolIdiT. it 800 Htdl.on Avt.. Yum., by th. Sun Println, Co.. .nd .t A. Port Offle. .1 Turn., Art.., M Clwi Annutl SubitrtpUon lUui III br YUMA 70 24 PAGES PHONE SU 3-3333 YUMA, ARIZONA, THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 1956 PER COPY 7e ARIZONA SENTINEL-VOL. 70 Yuma Water Plea Spurned Stassen Unveils New 1L1L Disarmament Proposal To change this (so that lEle toral delegates are divided accor ing to the proportion of the pop lar vote in that state) requires constitutional amendment. Thi means two-thirds approval in boi houses of Congress, plus accep ance by three-fourths of the state It's too late now. Tanner Bid Low On Yuma Highway Re-building Job A low bid of has he'e submitted by Tanner, Heuser an Garnett for tfie rebuilding job o Highway 80 here from 24th Stree to past the Air Base road. Announcement of the low bii eame today from Highway Com missioner William P. Copple o Yuma. The engineer's estimat was Awarding of. the con tract will be announced later. The job will include widening the roadway to 64 feet (or six lanes from 2-lth Street south. Just before the curve, the road will be divid ed around the curve and on to the Air Base road. An automatic traf fie signal will be installed at the access road. Special traffic circles will be in stalled to allow traffic from Coun ty llth Street and South 4th Avenue to enter Highway 80. Soviet Secret Police Chief Flies to London i LONDON (UP) Soviet Secret Police Chief Ivan Serpv arrived here today on a non-stop flight from Moscow in the first Soviet jet airliner ever shown west of the Iron Curtain. Serov, the successor to the exe- cuted Lavrenti P. Beria, came here to check the security arrange- ments for the 10-day visit starting April 18 of Soviet Premier Nikolai Bulganin and Communist party boss Nikita' Khrushchev. Bulletin! ld'1 ies 3600 'f or -'members' of .the legislature. The., mensutt'e ,vwhlch- ''''1 xt tng Strips Would Be Set Aside for Test Inspections LONDON (UP) The Unitfe itates today promised further de ails of its do-it-now disarmamen Ian despite Russia's new serie f nuclear tests announced her nd in Washington. Harold E. Siassen, the U.S. "dis rmament began un eiling the American plan Wednes ay 'with a -dramatic proposal fo to square mile "tes Tip" in Russia and the Unite tales where preliminary disarma lent control measures could b tried out. Almost at the same time thi ritish Defense Minislry an ounced that Russia has "recentl; mbarked on some further nuclea [sls." Russia began a similar se es al start of last summer's Summit Conference" in Geneva nd it was believed the new series was timed to bring pressure on the London Disarmament Confer ence. Informed sources said Stassen would enlarge on the American plan at today's session of the five power conference .while awaiting a Russian reply to 'his initial offer S t a s s e n proposed Wednesday that the United States and Russia both create test areas covering 000 to square the size of West which military experts from the two "na- tions could experiment jointly with means of detecting war-scale mili- tary buildups- Each test zone would contain at east one port, airfield and rail terminal and various non-secret military installations in which the effecls of a major assembly of sol- diers and supplies could" be ob- served. The proposal is a logical sequel o President Eisenhower's "Open Sky" plan for air inspection as a means of guaranlceing peace. Russia's Andrei Gromyko did not reply at observers here doubted he will do so until he has had a chance to check with Mos- 90 53 The Weather lighest yesterday Lowest 'emperature at 11 a.m. today 78 Relative humidity at 11 a.m. 12% .verage high this date 81 Vverage low this date 53 FORECAST fo Friday Mostly clear this afternoon irough Friday. Little cooler Fri- ay. High today 90. Low tonight Lowering to 41 in the lower, older areas. station wagon, driven by John' wagon, loaded to the hilt with goods and covered Moshler, 53-year-old Los Angeles evangelist, went with evangelistic signs, ran Into the canal as oft backwards Into the East Main Canal just Moshier was attempting to hack it towards 3rd south of 3rd Street this morning. City Patrolman Street. Westjjate cited the driver for no driver's Kcltli Wnstgatc (left) and Moshler (next to him) license and having his rear vision obstructed, watch the coining out party. Moshier's stnft pnoto) New Majority-Minority Fight Flares in House PHOENIX The Arizon louse of Representatives went o; s hectic way today, in the fad f a new majority-minority figh nd an emphatic stand taken by nal adjournment at thp parlies le Senate leadership demanding ossible lime. The latest squabble broke out ii le House yesterday afternoor hen the majority failed to pass concurrent resolution increasing ie salary of legislative members om 58 per day to annual The fight over procedure thai llowed temporarily caused Ihe ouse spotlight to stray from the atus of the so-called governor's water bill. But thai -measure, which has the endorsement of a. most all irrigation districts and water users in the state, appears headed for debate in the House either late this week or early next week. Rep. Dave Wine chairman of the House' Appropria- tions Committee, said a public meeting on the bill is planned by Allies Reveal Nuclear Test Staged by Soviet WASHINGTON (UP) Official many tests in so brief a time. In- jurces speculated today that the ew Soviet nuclear test means the ussians are going all-out to per- ct .atomic warheads for ngc ballistic missiles. long- Others said it proves the Rus- have achieved "atomic enty." They are now, one well- fonned source said, building up "whole family of atomic weap- s" comparable in versatility to o larger U.S. nuclear arsenal. Such weapons include atomic arheads for evprything that now es high explosives artillery ells as small as eight inches in ameter, a growing variety of issile charges, bombs of many libers, land mines, torpedoes, d depth charges. May Have Been More The new Russian explosion was announced Wednesday night in Ixjndon and Washington. It was part of a scries of explosions which have been going on intermittently since August, 1955. Although the United Slnles has reported only five Individual sliols In the series, informed sources said there may Ijnvc boon many more. Never before, since Ihelr first test' in September, 19-19, have Iho to rtage stead of months, the gap between tests previously had been years. It was Sen. Henry JI. Jackson a member of the Con- gressional Atomic Energy Commit- tee, who said the Russians appar- ently "are developing a whole fam- ily of tactical and strategic weap- ons." Reds May Be Ahead Tactical atomic weapons are de- signed for battlefield use, strategic for destroying vital city and in- dustrial centers far from the fight- ing fronls. Jackson has snid often that the Russians may be ahead in development of far-ranging mis- siles which, with H-bomb war- heads, could destroy entire cities without warning. Jackson and other members of Ih8 committee were quick to point out Hint the Russians, despite propaganda talk of nuclear test bans, are toiling as hard as they can to build up the size and quality of their atomic stockpile. The Atomic Energy Commission ilid not sny whether the new ex- plosion, which occurred in tho 'pnst few wns an nlomlc or hydrogen device. It used the1 %111. vonl which could bell s-s p.'m! elthar. 'I, his group Friday morning. How- ever, the bill'has already boon re- ported out by the key Agriculture and Irrigation Committee, which defeated proposed amendments by Yuma representatives. When the waler bill dons reach the floor, another fight almost cer- tainly will develop, although it ap- peared to have sufficient support to gain passage. Yuma forces were expected to make another attempt to amend the bill to spell out what they claim are prior rights, aimed at providing definite insurance no Colorado River water will be div- erted that now is being used in that part of the. state." While the House continued to take up a number of different measures Senate spokesmen made it clear they wanted to go home as soon as possible. It ap- peared certain the Senate wants o go home before House members are less optimistic. They expect to be a- round until April 7 or 15. Vote Changed The concurrent resolution i n creasing legislators' pay appeared leaded for passage yesterday aft- ernoon, since the majority had a substantial edge in Committee of he Whole consideration. But he- ore the vote was announced, lep. John Haugh (R-Pima) asked hat his vote be changed from 'aye" to Repl Enos Schaf- er (D-Pimat, a House floor lead- T, then realized the majority was hort of the necessary 41 votes, nnd also changed his vole in a ike manner for purposes of recon- ideration. Schaffer then filed notice of his ntent to seek reconsideration o f Southerners- Revive Talk Of 3rd Party ATLANTA (UP) Talk of a third political party, for disgrun- tled Southern Democrats was be- ginning anew today as Dixie's political leaders viewed Sen. Estes Kc'fabver's Minnesota victory with "surprise" but liltle change of heart. In South Carolina, where a su cessful bolt from the Democratic party was started in 1948, the way was cleared- for the formation o'f another third party in the coming presidential election. At Columbia, S. C., the South Carolina Democratic Convention passed a resolution that would al- low the stale's delegates to throw their support to a third party in the event the Democratic nominee or the 'party platform is distaste- ful to the South. The Soulh Carolina Democrats also proposed a southwide stand at the convention to make easier the Southern demand for a policy of continued state's rights. Most of the supporters of Adlai E. Stevenson in the South took the altitude that the Minnesota State Land Sale Goes Into Afternoon Session The sale of state-owned lands in the Wellton-Mohawk Division of the Gila Project was about half finish- ed at noon today. The fi4 parcels of state land and 11 owned by the Arizona Game and Fish Department went on the auc- tion block at 10 a.m. at the court house. A crowd estimated at 200 peo- ple sat through the morning ses- sion, which lacked the heated bid- ding that sometimes marks these affairs. A large number of them Arizona Senate To Debate Child Molestation Bill PHOENIX The Arizona Senate tentatively -scheduled Com- mittee of the Whole debate today on a bill to provide stiffer penal- ties for persons convicted of mol- estation of children. The House bill has been amend- ed so that death or mandatory life imprisonment no longer are the only penalties for crimes such as the assault of Carla Hixon near The amended version in effect''Conforms td the Little Lindbergh law. The House yesterday in Commit- tee of the Whole gave do-pass (o an amended bill requiring parenls to >e responsible for damage result- ng from actions of their children. The Senate bill originally fixed] the maximum responsibility ofth parent at S300, but this was am -nded to in the House. Rep. Enos Schaffer (D-Pima ponsored thp amendment propos ng the 51.000 amount, after Ihe louse defeated a proposal by lep. Charles Bloomquist (D-Co Iiiso) that would have removet ny limit on the extent of respon- bility. Seven other measures, none con- were given do-pass- The Senate earlier yesterday in- and passed under suspen- on of rules a bill making an em- rgency appropriation of necessary expenses entailed in accepted the offer of Roger Ernst, state land commissioner, to eat lunch on the spot. Ernst and his staff provided sandwiches, cold pop and coffee. The sale renewed at to wind up the remainder of the stale lands. The game department hold- ings were scheduled to be sold at 2 p.m. Four parcels offered before noon went unsold because of the un- availability of waicr. Bulk of the successful bids was a little more than the appraised valuations fixed on the individual parcels by state appraisers. Ernst announced this morning buyers would have 30 days in which to make down payments on their purchases. He also explained any parcels that go unsold today will be included in another sale which probably will be held in Oc- tober. He hopes to eliminate state holdings within the Wellton-Mo- hawk with that sale. Appraised value of the more than acres offered today ranges close to million. over-long session. The upper houso also gave do- ass in Committee of the Whole several minor bills. Campaigning SAN FRANCISCO (UP) Sen. Estes Kefauver flew to California today to capitalixe on his stunning victory in the .Minnesota presiden- pnmary was not a "true test." tial primary election. Four Hurt In Yuma Area Aufo Crashes Four persons were injured in ac cidenls in Ihe Yuma area during the past M hours. Donald Spears, 26, his wife iuise, 20, and their 20-month-ok baby, Katlierine were injurec shortly before 10 a.m. this morn- ing when thoir car rolled on High- way about 15 miles east of Yuma. The Spears had been liv- ing at the Wagon Wheel on High- way 80 at the foot of Telegraph Pass. Their car. with Mrs. Spears driv- ing, left the road on the right hand side of the highway and then rolled twice as it came across the lighway. Mrs. Spears, who is iregnant, was the most seriously njured. Highway Patrolman Neil Abrahams investigated. In an accident near Gadsden early last night. Anita Figuerios. !3, of 28S 1st Avenue was injured and admitted to the hospital. De- ails of tile accident were not available. Here in Yuma, a car and a :treet light suffered the only in- uries in an accident on 41h Street lear Madison Avenue. The driver if the car, William Chin, 34, of 261 .Iain, told City Police Ihat the- sun 'lindod him and he hit the lamp ost. Damage to Ihe car was es- mated at 5200 and to the light post about he bill today. Presumably, this vas to forestall a minority mo- ion for immediate reconsideration that might have meant death to. the bill. STOP TB it stops you! Get a free X-ray of your nhest to detect tuberculosis, iixry seconds is all it takes nnd it might save your life. the schedule below to see when Stale Health Department's mobile X-ray bus is in your vicinity. Mnr. 22, 2B, 24, Downtown Yuma lu-1, 2.0 p.m. Mm-. 27, 2S, 20, Store 12-4 .1-8 r-.rn 30, 31, Bnylcii No. 2, 12-4, Borgnine, Magnani Win Top Oscars, Van Fleet, Lemmon Best Supporting HOLLYWOOD (UPl Homelj icwcomer t Ernest Borgnine and his picture, a low-budget little filrr named "Marty." swept over vet eran actors and expensive pictures Wednesday night to win Holly- wood's coveted Oscars. Another offbeat newcombcr to Hollywood films. Italy's fiery Anna Magnani. was honored as the best actress of IK for her ex- plosive role in "The Rose Tattoo." her firs! U.S. movie. The supporting player awards made it. an all-ncwcomber year. Jo Van Flee! snored the award for "East of Eden" and Jack Lem- mon was honored for "Mister Rob- But .it was tho toothy Borgnine Ihe unpretentious "Marly1 and that captured inorc than scnlimont celebrities block tic mid glittering evening gowns who jammed the Hollywood Pontages Theater on Hollywood Blvd., fr the 2Slh nnnunl award ceremony, "Marly" wns made in New York from a television drama nl a cost of only But It swept over such multi-million dollar produc- tions as "Picnic" and "Mister Roberts" in the election among tile members of the honorary academy of motion piclurc artj and sciences. Borgnine a year was only a player of small villain roles in films and a virtual unknown. But Wednesday night the 38-yrar olr actor heard his name called by Grace Kelly, last year's best ac- tress winner, as the lop actor of 1955 for his first starring role or a gentle, lonely butcher in "Marty." None of tho winners had been nominated before for an ncadqmy award. Miss Van Fleet, a recent addition to Hollywood from the New York stage and TV, won Ihe supporting actress Oscar for her first film. Lemmon is another com- parative newcomer who was lured from New York television "Morty" also walked off wild Oscars for best direction, to Del- bert Mann, nml for best screen play to Poddy Chuyfsky- Both collected their trophies at Iho New York sccliun of the lelocost. Best Song "Love is a Many- Splendored Thins." Motion Picture Story "Love Me Or Leave Me." Story and Screen rupted Melody." Musical Scoring "Oklahoma." Dramatic Scoring "Love Is A Many-Splendored Thing." Editing "Picnic." Special Effects "The Bridges At Toko-Ri." House Committee Gives Water Bill 'Do Pass' Boost PHOENIX Tile Agriculture, and Irrigation Com- mittee Wednesday beat down Yu- ma attempts to protect what they claimed to be prior rights to Colo- rado River water and gave the so- called governor's water bill do- pas? recommendation. Only Reps. William Carr CD-Yu- ma) and Robert Klntier voted against putting the bill out for consideration of the House. However, they had been joined by Rep. Keith Brown (R-Pima) in support of a lengthy amendment designed to insure Yuma would receive ail Colorado River water to which it is entitled under pri- or rights, regardless of any depler tion in river flow. Brown had sought also to amend the bill to put a 20-year limitation on power service contracts, as tht original act now states. B r o w-ji claimed this would protect the users of power against higher costs. This amendment also was voted down. Last Hurdle Action by the House Committee was. expected to be the last hur- dle before House debate on t h e bill, perhaps the key bill now un- der consideration in the legisla- ture. Carr said that the .main.purpose of" the amendment which he and Klauer proposed was to prevent any attempt to take away Water now being used by Yuma area dis- tricts and diverting it to another part of the state. He said that all that Yuma was getting now was sympathy from Maricopa and assurances that there was no desire to take water from Yuma. But he said that the Yuma interests had grave doubts that .water could be divert- ed to Central Arizona and that there was a desire to have spell- ed out in writing the prior rights o which Yuma County claims it s entitled. Position Reversed Rep. Harry Bagnall vho opposed the Yuma amend- nent, argued that Yuma County was in a reverse position from that it had held in a losing battle ov- er Gila River water some time ago. He held that through adjudi- cation, rights prior to those held by Yuma on Gila River water, had been upheld. Rep. Ed Ellsworth (D-Maricopa) said he felt the governor's bill should be acted upon in its origin- al form. He said he had "confi- dence in the measure." Klauer again emphasized that flic Yuma area is not opposed to (lie governor's bill, but he said "We do think the governor per- haps overlooked thp seriousness of (he situation in Yuma. are will- ing to go along with the bill if our rights arc spelled out." Gov. McFarland Names Bravery Color Cinematography "To Catch A Thief.' Black and White Cinematog- raphy "The Rose Tattoo." Color Costume Design Charles Lc Maire, "Love Is A Many- Splendored Thing." Black and While Costume Design "I'll Cry Tomorrow." Color Art Direction "Picnic." Black and White Art Dircc- ion "The Rose Tattoo." Two-Reel Siiorl Subjcts "The of Lincoln." One-Reel Short Subject "Sur- City." Carlon Gohailcs." Sound "Oklahoma." Documentary "Men nsainM he Arctic' and "Helen Keller in icr Story." PHOENIX -im- Gov. Ernest McFarland today appointed a five- member committee on nomina- tions for slection of the recipient Young American Medal for Bravery or A Young A m e r lean Mortal for Service for 1955. Those named were George Mill- er, of Phoenix, scout executive for the Roosevelt Council. Boy Scouts of America: Don Dedera. Arizona Republic reporter-columnist: Jim I fan, Tucson Daily Citizen staff correspondent; Don Urry, chief editorial' writer for the Phoenix nnd Jack Woadock, man- a cor editor of the Arizona Dally Star. Tucson. Tho Kovernor selected the com- mitlpp upon invitalion nf U.S. At- torney General Herbert Brrtwncll Jr. All boys and girls under 18 will be eligible for consideration. Governors of tho various states would make recommendations bas- ed on nnminolions for Ihe award. A special committee of Hip De- linriment of Justice would solfict Ihn winners, .subject lo finil ap- proval by tiia attorney garwai.   

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