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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: March 7, 1956 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - March 7, 1956, Yuma, Arizona                             Eisenhower Okays Nixon for Running Mate THE EDITOR'S NOTEBOOK Water is much in the news now And although much has bee written over the years about wa er, some aspects of it are not we understood. The Central Arizona Project, fo .example. How many know just what it prc poses to do? It is a reclamation project di signed to take 1.2 million acre fe efore the House Health Commit- ee yesterday to support this view. The other Yuma ministers who .ppeared before the committee vere James Cullqmber of Grace Mazarcne; Richard Key of Firsl Christian, and Lee Provence of Baptist. The Yuma ministers presented the House Health Committee with a list of local clergymen who were in support of the or- iginal House bill calling for a 73- hour wait. "These churches and pastors, we believe, represent at least people living in Yu- ma and salt! the ministers. "The pastors believe Ihat at least three-fourths of :hcir membership arc in favor of Hquse Bill 83 (the 72-hour Many of them feel that even a liglicr percentage of their ile would favor it. Here are the other pastors list- d on the letter given to the House ommittee. Darrell Evenson of Morningside aptist, Russell Wood of First aptist, C. E. Archer of First outhern Baptist. Edwin Merry of (Continued on Pg. 4, Col. 4) Ike Says Nixon Can Have It if He Wants with lights blazing on their cars, creep along Highway 80 Wednesday afternoon during the Ugh wind storm. This scene in thn 2600 block on 4th Avenue was typical of the Tuma area yesterday. No accidents were reported despite the limited visibility. Brisk winds of up to 43 miles an hour were recorded here but dam-, age was only slight. This picture was taken through the windshield of a car narked on the west side of 4th Avenue. Traffic is headed north into the wind. (Sun Staff Yumans Escaped Serious Damage from Windstorm Yumans began digging dirt ou of their homes and businesses to day while growers kept a watchfu eye on the thermometer in the wake of yesterday's sand storm. Winds which ranged up to veloc- ities of 43 miles per hour locally swept through a wide area of the Southwest but apparently did little damage here. Electrical service was affected slightly in comparatively isolated areas when a pole was blown down near the Southern Pacific's East Yards. Service was restored within an hour. Local telephone service was nol nterrupted but some noise occur- in the lines. Damage to the vest made only one line available between here and Los Angeles. Growers were not able to de- ermine exactly how much damage heir crops suffered but early in- ications were wind burn and sand odging in lettuce would make up lie largest loss. Citrus was not jelieved damaged appreciably. The U.S, Weather Bureau warn- d growers to expect freezing emperatures tonight if the wind ubsides. The forecast calls for 37 Way Paved for Sewer 3ist. in West Yuma A resolution of intention to form sewage district in the West Yu- in area to cost an estimated )8-was passed by the Yuma City ouncil yesterday. Publication of notices and pub- c hearings to be held on the dis- let, known as No. 11, will take ome eight to 10 weeks before ork can start. City Engineer Mul- rd Wihsor Jr. outlined the pro- ram for the council. Engineer John Carollo of the liocnix engineering firm of Head- an, Ferguson and Carollo told ie council lhat a new district, o. 12, would be ready for coun- 1 approval by May 15th. Other rogrcss noted by Carollo Inclufl- d the fact that the pumping stn- ons" would bo ready for testing April 15th and could be put in- operation by May 1st. District No. 12 will lake In the ajorlly of the unsewcrei! a r c n uth of 8lh Street lo the clly. lim- its and portions north of 8th Street between 10th Avenue and the can- al. The council also gave final read- ing and passed on ordinance ad- opting plans and specifications for District No. 11. In other business the council approved the transfer of location for a wholesale beer and wine li- cense from 1037 3rd Avenue to 429 Gila Streel. It is the license re- cently purchased by the Sun Val- ley Beverage Co.- from the South- west Ice and Cold Storage Co. Approval was given to contrac- tor F. V. Timer of Tucson. to put in n sidewalk cover in front of Main Street. He is remodel- ing the old Bank Cafe building for Leeds Shoo Store. Present at the moctlnc were Mayor Hugh Fauids, Councllmen Richard Schuman, John Peach and George Shncklofortl and Clly Recorder Llnwood Perkins. degrees at the airport and down to 27 in lower, colder areas. Californians apparently did no fare as well. Palm Springs report ed one of the worst sandstorms in history with gusts measured up to 100 miles an hour. The sand boiled into blinding clouds and halted travel at many desert point. Traffic was stoppec on U.S. Highway 99 between Ban- ning and Indio where visibility was near zero. The blasts felled power poles, knocked over trees and at Palm Springs overturned house trailers. Plate glass windows were shatter- ed in the storm and a telephone cable serving the Blythe-El Centra Whitewater areas was blown down. The weather bureau predicts clear weather today, tomorrow and Friday with rising daytime tem- peratures Thursday. Hind Boy Regains Sight with Eye Of Dead Priest MILAN, "Italy (UP) Twelve- year-old Silvio Colagrande saw daylight for the first time in eight years today through the trans- planted cornea of a dead Priest 3on Carlo Gnocchi. The boy counted five fingers placed at a distance of 20 inches rom his left eye. The Opthalmic Clinic bulletin announcing the feat said the cornea tissue remained ''good and transparent" allowing he transplanting operation nine days ago. "I can the boy cried as specialists turned his unbandaged iyes toward the light. Gnocchi, known throughout much of Italy as The Little willed lis eyes to two blind children shortly before his death from cancer Feb. 27. Specialists have not yet tested he sight of the second patient, 18-yoar-old Amabilc Battistello. Hit-Run Crash A hit and1 run accident yester- day Is bclijg investigated by the Yuma Police Department. Jim Taylor reported lhat a car ill: his parked car on Madison Av- enue Sjul then left (lie scene. Dam- age was estimated at HquseProbers Blame Errors for Plane Failure WASHINGTON (UP) House investigators charged today that the Navy's 1500 million Demon fighter program failed because of "costly errors" committed by Mc- Donnell Aircraft, Westinghouse Electric, and the Navy. A House Government-Operations Subcommittee reported that four test pilots were killed trying to Ely the Demons. It said the planes were unfit because" of inadequately Mwered jet engines. Nearly 300 of the planes were Milt at a cost of million each. Of the first 60 produced, the sub- committee said, 56 will never fly. And four were refitted with more powerful engines. And another 220 ilanes, it said, "have not yet been ested in fleet use and now or soon may be obsolete." WASHINGTON President Eisenhower made it clear today that Vice President Richard M; Nixon can have the Republican vice presidential nomination again if he wants it. Mr. Eisenhower angrily .rejected any suggestion that he dump Nixon as his running mate. .He emphasized, however, that-he has not presumed to tell Nixon what he should do; that Nixon must chart his own political future. Mr. Eisenhower told his news conference that he has no criticism of Nixon as a man, an associate, or a running mate on the Republi- Yuman Denies He Tried To Bribe U.S. Tax Agent Henry Clark had no idea of brib- ing a federal internal revenue ag- ent and was simply paying a dis- puted claim when he offered ag- ents here said his attorney, John Flynn of Phoenix. Clark, 'who is freight and pass- enger agent for Southern Pacific railroad at Yuma, demanded a hearing when he appeared before U.S. Commissioner C. B. Wilson yesterday. The commissioner set hearing for 10 a.m., Friday, Mar. 16, on the charge of attempting to bribe the agent. This is the first charge of this kind in the state of Arizona. .Clark's attorney charged that re- venue agents had demanded (hey claimed was due on Clark's 1954 income, and they offered to compromise the claim for 5200. Clark agreed to avoid harrass- ment, even though his auditor told him he disputed the claim com- pletely and that at most he owed he government said Flynn. Clark has 'been released under bond. can ticket. But he said he has not presumed to tell Nixon what -he should do about the .campaign this year. The President also said that if his general physical fitness to con- duct the burdens of hard work .in the presidency showed signs of definite, deterioration, he would then.step aside and put the matter before the American people. Search For Peace He said he was not speaking of a brief illness such as a one-week attack of influenza, but basic in- ability to perform his job as he seefe it.. Other highlights of Mr. Eisen- hower's news conference: 1. He regarded as favorable the immediate reaction of Soviet Premier Nikolai Bulganin to his March 1 proposal for an eventual ban on production of nuclear weap- ons. He said this country, in its relations with 'Russia, should tie alert to follow up any opening that looks like it might lead to lessen- ing of international tensions. 2. He said he belives the United Nations should take urgent and early action on the tense situation in the Middle East, with Israel and the Arab world agreeing to abide by U.N. armistice terms. Soviet Discussion 3. He disclosed that Bulganin at the Geneva summit meeting last July discussed one or two moves Russia was making in the Middle East. He added that.Bulganin in effect described these moves as surely commercial. 4. As for the present day pros- pects of peace of war, he said he iclieves the world has awakened [o the fact that global war is get- Charge for New Water Meters Riles Builders The Yuma City Council was ur- ged yesterday to buy the water company by a group of Yuma building .trades people. Occasion for the remarks was the visit of the contractors and other interested persons to inform the Council that the water. com- pany had placed a charge of on each, new water meter install- ed. Contractor Perry Copple stat- ed that the group had learned feat it was all legal but added, "That's why the city should buy it." A. G.. -Bennett of the Foxworth Lumber Co. pointed that t.he cost of building a within the city limits .would go iip about a house. He noted that one 12-unit subdivision within the city, the contractor was going to have to pay 5600 for 312 .feet of 4" main and more.for.the 12 meters. Bennett said that didn't seem right. 3Vot STew -Idea 'Mayor Hugh Fauids pointed'out that the idea was not new and the water company.had previous permission to charge for the met- ers. "They were financing thern up to he said. The question of whether or not the money was refundable came up. Copple said that only part of it was refundable. He also complain- ed that "They kept it kind of se- cret like." He pointed out that contractors with contracts already signed for houses would lose the money for the water meters since it .was not made a part. of the cost of the house. He added "they weren't that kind of gentlemen to tell us that the new charge would start in 30 or days." Henry C. Murdock, of the Car- ting well nigh unthinkable and Pfnters Union, said that he would that he belives the uneasy peace Mike a L Publlc 'nforma- tion on this upsurge of charges or cold war is going to take a different direction. 5. He agreed with Defense Sec- retary Charles E. Wilson that there has been too much emphasis on this country's guided missile (Continued on Pg. 4, Col. 4) Central Arizonans Balk at Writing Yuma Water Rights into Legislation The struggle to protect Yuma County's water rights continues in ?hoenix today. But 28 Yuma Coun- y farmers aijd .business men who at in on the struggle in Phoenix esterday wonder if today's meet- ng will get anywhere. Yesterday in Phoenix, Central .rizona Project officials claimed icy were willing to recognize all Yuma County's existing water ghts in the Colorado River. But icy talked when asked to spell ut this recognition in a proposed ew law. The proposed law would enlarge he authority of the Arizona Pow- r Authority making it a ind of statewide rcclamatibn ser- jce. It would then have authority ver water, in addition lo electric Mwer. Yumans Apprehensive Because of this authority over Yurnans are apprehensive.; 'esterday, they asked for the third me new, expanded APA! e restriced from "planning" any- ling involving water used by! 'umn County irrigation districts, i 10 cities of Yuma and Parker, nd the two local military bases, TS ind YAB. "It can't be said Central rizona. i 'We can't grant or confirm wat- j r rights in stale said iney B. Salmon, vice president of ic Central Arizona Project. Joe Mansfield, attorney for three uma County irrigation districts, olnlocl oul Hint Yumims wore not sklng the law lo "grant or con- firm" a water right. But Yuma does ask that the new, expanded APA be restricted from planning anything for Colorado River water now being used by Yuma County. Sole Source Mansfield pointed out that Yuma County projects date back as far as 60 years. And for Yuma Coun- ty, the Colorado River is the sole source of water supply. But in the Central Arizona Project, the river is merely a "supplemental" source. Everett Miller, attorney for Yuma Mesa, asked a question he hail repeated many times before: "Everyone agrees that existing us- es in Yuma; County must be pro- tected. Then why is it you are not willing to set that protection down on paper." Salmon replied again that it would not be proper to "grant or confirm" water rights in such leg- islation. John B. Wisely, Yuma city at- torney, said it was puzzling lo him why no one seemed to know who wrole the now APA bill, which omitled protection of Yuma water rights. I have never heard the paternity of an illegitimate child denied more vehemently that the paler- nlly of this said Wisely. Promise- Answer Phoenicians promised lo find out not important anyway. "The auth- orship of the bill will not be impor- tant when the court conies to judge its meaning." It is impor- tant, he said, for Arizona to show the Supreme Court (in the suit against California) that "concrete steps are aclually being laken" to divert Arizona's share of Colorado River water. One full-dress meeting had been held in Yuma Feb. 28, with Gov.: McFarland, Wayne Akin of Inter-i stale Stream Commission, and At-! torney John Frank present from i Phoenix. Another meeting between'. attorneys was held yesterday mor- ning. Yesterday afternoon's big meeting was the third, and today the attorneys are trying it for the fourth time, in Phoenix. They were to meet at Yumans attending were: From Yuma Mesa, John Gardner and Everett Miller; Unit B, G. C. Morse; North Gila, Frank Fergu- son; Yuma County Water Users, Ernie Johannscn, A. J. Eddy, Ho- mer Kryger, Bob Consaul, Perry Ellington and Harold Corey; Well- ton Mohawk, Frank Bailey, Ted! Crismon, Fred Gregg, R. H. McEI-j on the water meters." He thought that the Council should get togeth- er with the water company to clar- ify the situation since "it is great- er in scope than it seems." Contractor Art Longbottom stat- ed, "If tile city owned the water company people wouldn't care a- bout paying into it." Delayed Deal Bennett said that "it conies as a pro-conceived but delayed deal. Another means of setting a rale increase without putting in any ad- ditional funds." A pamphlet, put out by the Ari- zona Water Co., was brought up by Copple. Tile pamphlet quotes an order of the Arizona Corpora- ion Commission which says that an applicant for an extension of mains .and distribution lines be re- quired to pay (o the ulilily an es- timated reasonable cosl of the in- stallation as a refundable advance. The pamphlet goes on to state, "Where extensions are requested to serve an area in a town or city which would require n larger am- ount of investment than expected revenues could justify.. .subdivid- ers will be required lo put up a non-refundable contribulion equal to the amount estimated that could not be Carried hy customer reve- nue." A spokesman for the water com- (Cont'd on Page 4, Col. 4) of practicing law, haney and Joe D. Mansfield; City of Yuma, Councilman George Brill I and John B. Wisely; legislative del-! cgation, Sens. H. C. Glss and R. H. i Thompson, and Reps. Robert L. i Klaucr and William B. Cnrr; oth- ers, E. F, Sangtilnetti, Howard R. Gwynn, James F. Byrne, Jones who was the "father" of the pro- posod law. Oslwrn, Snm Dick, Bill Hutfclotft, Perry M. Ling, special legal j F, C. Bradcn, and John C. Smith, counsel in Phoenix, saitl this was] Jr. STOP TB -rbefore it stops you! Get a free X-ray of your chest to delect tuberculosis. Sixty seconds is all il lakes and it might save your life. Watch the schedule below lo see when State Health Department's 'mobile X-ray bus Is In ycur vicinity, Mir. 6, Wtllton Mt p.m. Mar. 7, Somerttm 10-1, 2-fl, Mar. 8, Soraerlon 10.1, 2-fl. Mar. 0, Crano School Mar. 10, Crane School 10-1,   

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