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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - April 5, 1954, Yuma, Arizona                             JONES OSBORN Monday Afternoon Death. Wlicn you think you've conic face with it, what are your thoughts? Authors hnvo been telling us for years that our whole lives flash through oiir minds at this moment. Tf true, some folks must gel bored with the same old story; folk's like race drivers, trapeze ar- tists, bullfighters, crop dusters and the like face it so often. Now we have an author who de- nies the story. You recall that Ernest Hem- myigway had a couple of plane crashes in. Airica last .January. He tells about it in Look magazine this week. "Your past life does not through your brain" at the monie of death, says the famed author. Instead, you're too busy thinkir of purely technical things, Hemming way. Like listening the ammunition to explode in tl burning airplane. Or wondering whether you squeeze between the car started to pass and the one con ing in the opposite- direction. YUMA VOL. 80 Phone 3-3333 14 PAGES YUMA, ARIZONA, MONDAY, APRIL S, 1954 P2R COPY 7c ARIZONA VOL. 80 Churchill With Pact in 1 on A- Dohnld Mclniyre Dies at Age 94 Donald Mclntyre, a former Yu ma postmaster who lived in Yum a for 69 years, died in the Elks hos pital in Tucson last night at Hit age of 9-1. He had been in failing; health foi the past year or so although he was active and alert up until last fall, when he was taken to the Southern Pacific hospital in Tuc- son. Two months ago he was re- moved to the Elks hospital. His son, Donald Jr., of Tucson, was at his side when death came and his other son, Albert, of Yu- ma. was hurrying to the hospital. A third son, Douglas, of Los An- geles, died in 1953 in San Francis- co. Born in Scotland Donald Mclntyre was born in Mcthven, Scotland, on June U, I860. He came to the U. S. m 1852, slopping first in Chicago for a year and then spending a year in Den- ver. The third year of his life in tin's country found him for the Southern Pacific Railroad in El Paso. He then re tinned to Scot- land for a three-month visit, aft- er which he came back to the and arrived in Yuma on Oct. 6, 1885 when this was still the' Ter- ritory of Arizona. He went back to work for SP and didn't stop until May 31, 1922. when he retired as car inspector foreman. The day after his retire- ment he became postmaster of Yu- ma. which position he held until jnss. Married in Mr. Mclntyre was married Dec. 12. 18S6 to Carolina Perry, who died Aug. 7. 1951, in Tucson at the age of 91 years, S7 of them lived in Yuma. When Yuma lodge of Elks was {Cont'd on Page 8, Col. 4) after Yuma Luck and Fast in By HOB WEKLKY A polite 26-year-old Californian pointed a gun at the belly of II, Kntliff, manager of the Cork' 'n Bottle Liquor Store Saturday night. He demanded and got the that was in the cash register but less than 20 minutes later he in jail. Luck and fast work combined to put the youth behind bars in short order. Ratliff and his wife were in the store around S p. m. Saturday night when the youth walked in the store at the corner of 4th Avenue and IGth Street. Rat- liff was in the rear while Mrs. Rat- liff was tending the counter. ?e youth, later identified as Wil Abruzzini, Gilroy, Calif asked Mrs. Ratliff if he could speak to the boss. She called her husband from the rear and when appeared, the youth pointed Uie gun at his belly and said iu a low "T didn't want to alarm he lady." He motioned to tiie cash and said, "Put it all in i sack." Mrs. Katliff Watches Ratlift' said that it took him sev- eral seconds to gain his presence of mind and then he told the youth .hat tiie sacks were under the.coun- er.. He. asked, .the -youth...not to ihoot him when lie reached for a ;ack. The bandit said. In he meantime, Mrs. Ratliff w a s vatching ths scene from behind a creen in the rear but she did not la re to make a move for fear that icr husband would be shot. Ratliff sacked all the money, 225, and handed it over to the onth. The young man turned and falked out the door with the warn- ig that Ratliff should-not make a love for several minutes. As soon s tho bandit disappeared from HELD FOB ROBBERY William Abruzzini (seated center) has been charged with the Sat- urday night holdup of the Cork 'n Bottle, -1th avenue anil IGth street. At the left is Deputy Val Quintero who disarmed Abruz- zini; Sheriff .Jim Washum holds the two guns that the youth had on him. Standing at right is AI Redondo, Yuinn youth who followed Ahruz- 7.ini from the liquor store and pointed him out to Quintero. Seated at the right is U. Ratlin who was held tip and robbed of (Sun Staff ight Irs. towards the skating rink, Ralliff phoned the sheriff's ffice and Mr. Ratliff ran to the ear and shut off the lights and eered out the rear door. The beginning of the end started few seconds laters. As Ratliff eered out the crack in the door, saw a large number of kids round the rear of the skating ink. Suddenly Uie bandit walked :to view with the sack under his rm. Ratliff watched the y o u t h imb into his car and start off. lien he ran out to try ta get a imber. He failed to do this and en spotted Al 18, 421 h Avenue, sitting nearby in his 7 Mercury convertible. Ratliff elled for Redondo to follow Uie ar as the man in it had just bbed him. Redondo took off and llowed the car. Deputy I'arked Xearby As luck would have it. 'Deputy icriff Val Quintero was parked 16th Street on -ith Avenue Iking to a friend. When he got call from the sheriff's office, made- a fast U turn and pulled in front of the store as Ratliff is .running out the front door. jumped into the car and y headed south on 4th Avenue chase. Quintero did not use his red hi or siren for fear of letting e bandit know that he was being asnd. City police and other dep- uties were hurrying to the scene of the crime but the chase had al- Yuma County Fair Set To Open Wednesday Arizona's largest county fair, the Yuma County Fair, will open it.s gates to an expected record-break- ing crowd on April 7 for a five-day run. j This opening marks Uie second annual fair in the county. The first fair, held just a year ago, saw people pass through the fair- grounds on Highway 80, just east of Yuma. All exhibit spaces have been en- larged this year approxi- fCont'd on Page 8, Col. Reed Gets 90 Days and Fine for Reckless Driving Willie Reed. "IS, of Snmcrton was sentenced to a S300 fine and HO days in jail this morning on charge of reckless driving. Rccd IKK! been found guilty of reckless driving after a jury trial in jus'.icft court Friday but Uie jury up on a drunk driv- ing chnrgc. Justice of the Pca.cc Eiscl Ryrd gave Heed the maxi- mum sentence. The youth had been involved in Soil Temperatures This is a continuation of cotton land soil tempnr.iliircs: Mnliiiwk Valley Wright. Ir Mar. 9 Viinin Valley Valley farm .T. Barklcy. Ir Mar. f> .loiiannscn. Ir Mar, Ii. .M'Mly, ir Mar. 9 (iila Valley Silencer, ir Alar. 12 V S S M G2 62 Kl R- RI'OX 83 63 fi.'i 02 62 (VI 65 fi7 61 63 63 65 63 63 65 67 a five-car wreck on 8th street on Sunday March 14th, in which five persons wore injured. Witnesses testified that Reed was drag rac- ing with another car just prior to the spectacular crash. Defense Attorney Thadd Baker asked for leniency for the youth boraiisn of the fact that it was his first offense and because he will automatically have his drivers li- cense suspended for failure to have liability insurance. .Judgo Byrd told Baker that he was Koinp to'assess the maximum penalty and that the fine and jail .sentence could he annealed to tho superior court. In tho meantime, two other youth's who were riding: in the car with Reed found themselves be- hind bars. Wayne Kvans, 20, and Lester Krcidel, 18, were charged by Highway Patrolman Louis Oochrp.n wilh possessing liquor. They had toslifiwl in Rrert's behalf during the trial Friday and had ad- mitted drinking beer. inately entries listed in the Home Economic and Agriculture sections of the fair. Commercial exhibits, which are housed in the largest tent ever erected in Ari- 520 feet x 80 feet, have been increased by one third with 164 companies displaying merchandise. A dogleg tent has been added to Uiis huge commercial tent to house a new food show, baking contest, and the twice-daily stage shuws. Coronation of the Yuma County Fair Queen will take place in this tent on the opening night, April New Kifles Offered A major attraction at any fair. the carnival section, offers new rides this year. Concession stands such as dart games, food booths, and baseball throws are operated by Yuma County civic and fra- ternal organizations witli local per- sons operating the .stands. An outstanding event at the fair will be tiie annual livestock salu Saturday, April 10, when, fat calves. Iambs, and hogs owned and fed by 4-H'eis and Future Fann- ers of America go on the- auction block. Premium prices are gen- erally paid for tho top grade ani- mals in this sale. Also scheduled for Saturday will be the annual Kids Day events with carnival rides free to youngsters during the morning session. Con- tests will determine who is the champion bike rider, pie cater, and bubble gum blower. During the afternoon section of Kids Day. a costume and pet pa- rade will be held wilh prizes given out for the best costumes and most unusual pets. A new event (his year, the hnk- ing contest, will see Yuma County residents vie in a pie and cake baking contest every day during the fair. Women, men, and junior divisions are scheduled a bake-off planned for the last day ol the fair, April lllh. Livestock Kntrir Increased live-stock (Jain entries this Doubled in 1954; Again in 1955? After Ihe article on yiimn's mostly swiftly expanding money maker was "made into a. page" inside today's paper, tho Sun reporter got hold of Harry El- lis, of the Yuma Mesa Fruit Growers Assn. Mr. Ellis said lemon acreage here will be doubled in 1054 and then doubled again (to acres) in 1955. Ton price, he said, rims around ?80, with more being paid by spot, hnycrs at times. So far, by-products men are taking all Yttma can grow, year have forced fair officials to increase livestock pens 50 per cent. Oilier agriculture'entries are also larger. The Home Economics division promised a icconl number 01 food and clothing entries this year while entry numbers are also up in the Fine Art. Photography, Collections and Mineral Department. A new division added this year is the Floral Culture- Department which includes exhibits of single flowers and arrangements. In charge of the Fair Ground is George Britt. chairman of the board of directors, assisted by directors J. P. Ellington, Robert Broussard, A. H. Guitimes. Hugh Faulds, Homer Kryger, Al Face. and Ernie Johamiseu. A 17-man {Cont'd on Page 8. Col. 3) Yuma Girl Chosen To Vie for State Jo Ann Beecroft, a cadet firs! lieutenant in the Yuma squadroi of Civil Air Patrol, has been se- lected to represent Arizona competitions for the intrunutional cadet exchange program. Miss Beecroft, daughter of Mr. and -Mrs. Joe A. Bet-croft of 516 7th Ave., Yuma, will be flown in military aircraft to Portland, Ore- gon, Saturday where outstanding CAP cadets from the western U.S. will be gathered. From this group three girls will be chosen lo par- ticipate in the two-week exchange program starting July 15. Miss Beecroft was fit at chosen by a vote of Yuma CAP cadets and then was selected as Uie stata rep- resentative by a screening commit- Deadline Tonight Marsha! Juin Resigns ToFialitNATO PARIS Marshal Alphonse t resignation and appoint a replace- Juin. stripped of all his French merit. defense post.s last week, resigned today as NATO commander of all Central European land sea and air forces. He said lie would join Gen.' fchnrle.s DeOaulIe in an all-out fight against the European army plan. Juin was publicly hum bled for Ignoring an order of Premier Jos- eph Laniel to explain in person a speech in which Juin publicly de- nounced the Euronean army "plan. The army scheme would place rearmed Germans in the uniform uf a common European defense force. The marshal informed Laniel he was declaring war on (he Euro- pean army scheme, backbone of American defense plans for West- ern Europe, in a 30-minulu confer- ence in Laniei's office today. Foreign Minister Georges Bi- retary-general Lord J sin ay a n d dault promptly called NATO Sec- aslted him to convene an immcd- ,ate meeting of tho 14-n a t i o n NATO Council to act on Juin's Laniel was kicked yesterday by an angry extremist among a mob who used the firing of Juin as an excuse for a demonstration tit the Arch of Triumph, where the Premier and Defense Minister Kene Pleven were taking part in ceremonies honoring the dead of the Indo-Chinese War. Not since former Premier Leon Blum was att.ic.hed by extreme rightists in had a high rank- French political figure suffered such an Indignity. Laniel asked Minister of Interior Leon Marlinautl-Deplat to account for the laxncss of 800 members of his police force on fluty at the ceremony. Martinaud Deplat later told lews-men that neither Laniel nor Pleven had been hurt. Eyewitnesses and news photog- raphers said the mob slapped Pleven and pulled his hair. Some of them tried to overturn Laniei's automobile but were beaten back by police. Senate Passes Health Code on 3rd Reading PHOENIX The Senate for appropriations totaling The (icadlim- for (he halting contest to be staged at Yuma Cminty Fair, located in the Koocl Shnu Tent, is scheduled tu rinse tonight. Entries may even be made by or by blanks picked up at Fair Office, Chamber Commerce Building. (I rand prize, is an nll-eleelrir sfnve. You cnn Imke, that cham- pion pie or cake. massed on third rending today th> uch-am ended and eon lew state health code. The bill, which cleared the up )er house by a vote of 16 to 0, nov to the House, for concurrence n Senate amendments. The bill is xpected to land in conference com nittee. Sen. William Sullivan rn-CIil.i) n explaining his vote, said lie felt ic Senate had done the snme ling to the proposed Health Code lat it bar! done to the Under round Water Code, but it better to have some sort ode on the books than none, at TI." He. said changes could be by the legislature next year. The Health Code provides fnr iccific regulations which may bo forced by Ihe State Health Do- nrt merit. The State Supreme ourt threw out the previous State "ealth Code in holding that ie Legislature did not make spe- cif in powers for the department. Fund Trimming Trgcd PHOENIX The House Ap- propriations Committee today adopted reports recommending the trimming down of appropriations asked in four Senate bills for capi- tal outlays at the two state col- leges and the university. The Senate bills called originally 1 nnd the House recommended cms to bring the tola! S2 million. The measure have been key bills in the differences between the two houses, nnd have been held up in the lower chamber until the Senate passes the general appropriations bill. Tho Senate has refused to give final nction on the big money bill unless something is rlone with the construction measures. Assisting Peace LONDON Prime Mini- ster Winston Churchill revealed to- day that 1913, two years before the atom bombing of Hiroshima, lie and President Koosevelt agreed to uonsulL on the building and use of atomic weapons. Churchill made the disclosure during his speech to the House of Commons. He displayed a.sheet of paper and said: "Here it is in my own hand- writing." The Prime .Minister listed these points of his agreement with Roosevelt: to use this agency i atomic weapons) against each other." 2. "Not to use the weapon against third parties without each other's consent." 3. Not to communicate to any- one, without each other's consent, information on "cube alloys." Chin (.'hill explained that "cube al- loys" was the code name for atom- weapons. I. Tu deal with postwar indus- trial development of atomic energy on terms to be specified by both the president and the prime min- ister. u. To organize a committee in- cluding the U.S.. Britain and Can- ada to map combined atomic poli- cy. Churchill said that the late Sen. Brian McMahon told'him two years ago "there would have been no McMahuii Act" had he known of the Churchill-Roosevelt agreement. The McMahon Act forbids the ex- change of atomic information. The Weather Highest yesterday 93 Temperature nt 11 a.m. today S3 Relative humidity a! 11 a.m. Average high this date s-i Average low this date 5C FORECAST Tuesday JfiRliI: Variable high cloudiness this ifteinooh. tonight and Tuesday. Mostly sunny days. Westerly wind 5-25 miles per hour at times this iflernoon. decreasing tonight. Con- inucrt warm. Kxpecled high 91; ow tonight 55 to 65. Pence Bomb LONDON Ministen Winston Churchill declared today ir. a vigorous speech to the House of Commons that the American liydrogen bomb test "increased he chances of world peace more than tiie chances of world war." Churchill said Britain would not isk the United Stairs to halt the 5 of H-bomb tests in the Pa- "We would rather- have them carried out there than in lie said. Full Discussion "Let us all thank God for spar- ing us that." Churchill addressed Commons in response to a Laborito demand for a full discussion of the implica- tions of Ihe hydrogen bomb tests. He spoke after former Laborite Prime Minister Clement Attlee had introduced a motion calling for immediate talks on the issue be- tween Churchill, President Eisen- lower and Premier Georgi Malen- Itov of Soviet Russia. Churchill was said by authorita- me s'.mn-es to have been supplied President Eisenhower with all information on the American H- bomb tests permissible under U. S. security laws. Showdown h Delayed on Appointment of Secirs WASHINGTON Sen- te Investigating Subcommittee to- who jriMiKS IV ACTION" Knur of tlin jmlffrs who jiirigrd Ihtt IGlli Aiinunl Flower Show Sntnrdny arc sit (he, Washington" table set ting ilomrnleil liy Ihe Yuma (fnnlen Club. From Irlt, Mrs. IJciyrf Adams, I'hncni.x, Mrs. If. II. MrMullen, rreicott, Mrs. Glenn Quick, I'hoe- nix, ana Mrs. Jim Wilkerxm, Frescott, Other judges wore: Dr. R, B. SI reels, Tucson, Mrs. ('toypool. Phoenix, Mrs. II. Morris, Phoeniv, Mrs. WHIfom Krnnelly, Phoenix, nnd Mrs. Alton Pnyiie, .I'linenlx. (For slory and ad- ditional pictures ace Page 3.) (Sim Staff FholoJ, j i spite pro-McCarthy statements he in 1052. Temporary Karl Miindt. iIl-SDi met to'j-iy with Sen. John L. Mi-Clcllun of' Arkansas. .senior subcommittee and announcer! the meiS; pu; off until tomorrow MI Mundi .said the postpone.] at the Kvoivit Oirksen d: IIJi. visiting his in and could not return in time for a Cession to lay. 1'rai.srd McCarthy M undt said Sears atten let! about three minutes of today's meeting and told that the subcommit- tee "wanted to discuss develop- ments that h.id takni place since we last saw him" Thursday morn- ing. Th.it was when Sears was hired after saying lie had never taken a nd or .Mr- (.'a; ihysini. A :Vw hours later Boston i ic per files yielded stories indicating he had praised the Wisconsin Republican. Mundt said Sears replied that he "very much wanted to talk the subcommittee." Mundt. said the group "will sure- ly have .in annuunvmcnt after Presumably this would I'tHKTHi whether Scars remain as coun.sel. Seeking Showdown Reporters a sited whether Sears would function today {is subcom- mittee coun.sel in sotting up a s'-.'iff and rsMbtishiiip rules of proced- ure. Muudl sit id Scars' first task was to lueet with Dirksen, who ft jubcommUtee on rules. With Dirksen absent, said, there was nothing1 for Sean to do Democratic members of the sub- commiUeo are seeking a show- down on v.iii'iher Sears should M.'Oli.m says he has about Scars' and wants to question about uoubts. Secretary of, State Dulles said today Communists are. "coming awful cloae" to jsion in XndoChina j which might retaliation 4 j against the Chln-j jese raalnlsicU [Earlier be [.the Red i must be, met by., Days to 2 County Fair   

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