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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: August 7, 1952 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - August 7, 1952, Yuma, Arizona                             THE EDITOR'S NOTEBOOK ly JONES OSIORN I mentioned the oilier day that B. DeMille. the film" pro- dueer. got a cool response to his remarks as the main speaker at a big banquet given by the VFW for their distinguished guests at the 53rd campment. nguis national I said the audience was "cool" but of course that doesn't moan everyone reacted the same. Tin-re were all sorts of individual re- actions ranging from enthusiastic down. Kul as an audience, taken as a whole, Ihe crowd gave Ihe great movie mogul a chilly, formal ap- plause at the end of his speech. Not once did thev interrupt his remarks with applause. Why? j.ln the first place. Dc.Mille's lalk frankly polilical. There were many in Ihe audience, regardless of Ihcir polilical affiliation, who felt that a national VFW conven- tion was not the proper place to introduce partisan politics. DeMille started fight off by jumping onto the slogan. "We nev- er had it so an appeal, if not precisely the official slogan of the Democrats Ihis year. happened to be silling by the main door, and I saw a number of guesls get up and leave the room in anger. One group from Kentucky, the home o( Vice President A'lbcn Barkley. was really burned up. There was some talk about them inlroducing a resolution the nexl (lay to condemn partisan politics at a national VFW convention. SjiThcn DeMille climbed onto what he called "political which he defined as Ihe partici- pation of labor unions in politics. Whether you agree with him or not; whether you believe that la- bor unions should or should not participate in political affairs, you will agree, I think, that DC- Millc's attilude was nol likely lo make a big hil with those in t h e audience who were members of IJbor unions. And so he spoke. The audience was shocked, or offended, or angered, lhal by the time he got around to what should have been a sure-fire applause get- ter [he condemnation of coin- Next morning, l noliced tho Los Angeles Examiner, always inter- TJted in Ihe .doings of mo'vie folks and in the fight against polilical sluck DeMille's story way back on Page 7. The Weather at Yuma Ui.-t 21 hours 21 hours Avi-rayi.i Average low thi.x daV ..10-5 Rvlalive humidit y at H 20' Kwwast to Friday Night: Clear to high scattered cloudiness this afternoon, tonight, and Fri- day. Slightly wanner this after- noon. Some what lower humiditv. YUMA SUN-VOLUME 186 7 Cent. Copy YUMA. Coup Near in Iran U.S. flyers Down 4 MIGs, eFive SEOUL i American Sabrcjels knocked four Communist MIG-15 jot planes out of the skies mid damaged five others in high altitude air duds over North Ko- rea. On the ground, hard-fighting South Korean inlanlrymcn pushed Ch'-ie.-e troops, off vital "capitol hill" on ihe central front. II was the sixth time ihe hcighl has changed hands since Tuesday. Seventy-six Sabres clashed with 120 MIGs in seven air battles, sev- eral of them taking place near Sinuiju, only a few miles soulh of lhc Yalu river boundary bclwccn North Korea and Manchuria. Down II In Monlh The nine MIG's shot down or damaged loday brought the loll of enemy jets for August to -11. Dogged Republic of Korea sol- diers of the famed "Capitol" Di- vision fought a si-c-siuv batlle for control of Ihe key hill wesl of Iho Pukhan river on the central front. The hill changed hands for a sixth time early today as the Ko- rean infantrymen smashed to Ihe top and regained control. During the day. Allied lighler- bombers and artillery kept up a nerve-shattering series of attacks on lhc Chinese lo keep them from cotmlerallacking. The South Korean attack began at 5 a.m. and three hours later they had knocked the Chinese off Ihe crest. Karlier today, lhc Communists hail won control and had driven on to the U. line. The attack that brought the Reds temporary possession of the hill was preceded by a 24-hour mortar rind artillery barrage, one of the heaviest barrages of the Korean war. The atlack post the Reds 192 casualties. In Ihe lalcst air bailies, a dam- age claim was made by 2nd Lt. Edward Webster, -15 w! sth St., J. Dcnnehy, 8476 Glencrest Drive, Sun Valley, Calif., destroyed one MIG. The Allied pilots shot down or damaged Ihe eight MIGs today in the three air battles near Sinuiju, I on the North Korean side of the Yalu river. LONDON Minister Winston Churchill convened a spc- ciill cabincl meeling today to dis- cuss the "very grim" prospects of a Communisl coup in Iran. Briliiiu was reported preparing new proposals for a settlement 01 the Anglo-Iianian oil dispute in an altempt lo keep Iran from'falling lo Hie Reds. "The latest reports from Tehran indicate the situation is becoming very a foreign office spokesman said. Anxiety Mounts The siwkesman said reports from Tehran by British and Amer- ican officials coincided and anxi- cly was mounting in both coun- tries. The government was believed lo be in close touch with the United Slates on the Red threat, and the two powers presumably would act together. The U.S. has'hclped arm and Irain the Iranian army and has made Iran a key country in its point four economic assistance program. Naval Movements Reliable sources said sudden British naval movcnienls in the Mediterranean last week end were prompted more by the deteriorat- ing situalion in Iran Ihan by de- velopments in Egypt, as first sug- gested. The British cruiser Birmingham and tank landing craft Dieppe sailed with destroyer escorts from Malta, while the aircraft carriers Glory and Magnificent left on short notice from Istanbul, Tur- key. The destination of neither task force was announced. Churchill was known lo have said recently that the "Russians have got to be kept out of Iran" and he obviously was concerned over reports of growing Commu- nist boldness in that oil-rich counlry. Terrorist in Charge Among the more significant de- velopments was the election of Seyed Kashani, Iran's master ter- rorist and most powerful religious leader, to the speakership of the JIajlis, lower house of Parliament. Kashani's gangs of loughs formed .common-.cause, with mem- bers of Ihe outlawed Communist Ttirieh party to bailie police and troops in the bloody July 21 riots that restored nationalist Premier Mohammed Mossadegh to power. Jo Recapture Pacific Defense Conference Ends After Setting Up Military Body HONOLULU. T. H. ic mutual defense Ireaty makers got "off to a good start" today in their campaign to resist Commu- nist aggression. Top diplomats from the United States, Australia and New Zealand ended their historic three-day con- f-rence at midnight after setting up a permanent military body to work out- resistance plans. "We have got this thing off lo a Secretary of State Dean Acheson said. "Everyone is pleased with (his meeting." China Creates! Threat Before announcing formation of Ihe military group. Ihc foreign ministers of the llirec conferring nations made il plan Ihey consid- ered Communist China the great- est threat to peace and security in the Pacific. Acheson and the external affairs ministers of Ihe other two coun- ties concluded lhc conference, de- signed to implement the Anzus treaty signed in San Francisco last September, by agreeing not to at- tcmpt to establish formal relation- ships with other Pacific slates at this time. The establishment of the mili- tary organization lo (unction under the council was considered lhc ma- jor accomplishment of the ses- sions. Communique Issued Arthur W. Radford. com- mander-in-chicf of the U.S. Pacific fleet, was the first member named to Ihe military group. The Aus- tralian and New Zealand members will be named later. In a joint comnumiqtip. Acheson announcer! along wilh Australia's Richard G. Casey and New Zea- land's T. Clifton Webb that the military organization would hold "an early meeting" in Honolulu. The diplomats agreed lhal nicin- of lhc Aimis Treaty Council would "continue to keep in close touch through existing channels with other slates concerned to pre- serve peace in the Pacific area." Null- of lenity The fiflh and last council srssinn was devoted entirely lo n. discus- sion of Iho Red Chinese threat (lur- ing which Hie ministers received n detailed briefing from military experts on what lhal Ihrcol means ir (erms of war. iChe conferences ended on a strong nole of unity. Casey said that there had been "no quibbling" and "no sort of maneuvering for points" during the three days of talks at Kanoohc Marine Air Station, sile of Ihe first Japanese atlack on Pearl Harbor. Frank Costello Wins Jail Term Delay NEW YORK Frank Costello won a one-week de- Iny loday in his baltle to avoid serving a jan sentence for con- tempt Congress. ATHENS. Greece The Greek army shelled disputed Cam- ma island in the Evros river to- day in an attempt to drive off Bul- garian Reds who it July Pi ess reports said Greek inoi1- tnrs started fires which shrouded the island In smoke. A Greek general slaff commu- nique said the bombardment began after a radio warning and in the presence of United Nations observ- ers. "So far, (here has been no re- I Ihe communique said. NATO Croup III Naples, Italy, an official spokesman said the southern Eu- ropean Atlantic pact headquarters of U. S. Adm. Robert B. Carney was "closely following" develop- ments in ihe dispute. Greece Is a member of Hie Atlantic pact and conies within Carney's command. Athens newspapers said Greek observers saw one Bulgarian on the eight-acre Island at a.m., but waited until dawn to be sure. The presence of Bulgarians on lhc island was established after day- break and reported to the general staff. Athens itself was au- thorities issued a precautionary alert to genilarmery and army units. Gamma island lies in the Evros river, which for 10 miles forms the frontier between Bulgaria and Greece. The island always has been considered Greek, but Bul- garian troops landed there July 23 and seized control after killing Iwo Greek gendarmes and wounding three. The Greek government com- plained to the U. N. and the or- ganization's Balkan Commission went to the scene. Greek Foreign Minister Sopho- cles Venizelos two days ago de- manded ihe "Bulgarian's evacuate the island. As of yesterday. Greek and Bulgarian troops were report- ed lined up on opposite sides of the river. Identify Man Killed In Fall From Train The man who fell-1 off a freight train near Old Tacna last week has been identified according to the sheriff's office. He is Bill Gihbs Koch, 30, of Oklahoma. The FBI made the identification from fingerprints sent from here.. Koch had been in the army during the war. An eyewitness told of seeing Koch roll off the freight and die under the wheels- Both men were hitch-hiking a ride on the train.. Crowds Flock to See High Tide on Coast REDONDO BEACH sands of spectators flocked to the sea shore last night to get a glimpse of the high tide and pounding surf which failed lo live up to its expected ferocity. Police reported no new damage from last night's high of 6.8 feet at p.m.. but curious persons caused bunipcr-to-bumper traffic jams. Beach officials said the surf ap- parently had subsided. WASHINGTON officials" said today they see no particular danger to world .peace in the Greek military move to re- take a liny island "in the Evros river which was seized by Bulgar- ian Reds. These officials called the seizure of Gamma island another Com- munist move to keep Easl-Wesl tensions high. They said the island has been in dispute for a long time because of a change in course of the river. Huge Semi Rams, Smashes Trailer A huge semi rammed the rear end of a trailer at noon yester- day causing a total of over 53.000 damage but only minor injuries were suffered in the -wreck. The trailer, being towed by D. G. Borden of Tampa, Fla., 'was rammed in the rear by a truck driven by Edwin B. Harwell, 3D. Section___ARIZONA VOLUME 186 Registrations For Primary Total monrniimv 'n n ,'T'S ,r I I IT M f r till forma an hm-itirs. lie told of- ce s ha I and nunpnnion, liny had from Caiiuirllli, sinl.. Hospital. The youngster said thai he had been in (hi- in- slllullon fur two and a half ymrs and llmt (Ids was his fifth escape. At IHI is riilnilimin Ki'llli Weslgalc of (In- city the right is mi Indian being Ircl id'f In h, spriul flvr days lor bi-lng drunk. (Sun Staff Sheriff's Deputy Fired On By Mounted Gunman SIERRA MADRE sher- iff's deputy driving alone in a pn- Irol car was fired on la.nl night by a mysterious gunman on horse- buck who galloped off into the darkness before Ihe deputy could fire back. Deputy R i c h a r d A. Walker of the Altadcna substation near the Hastings The deputy said he heard Ihe horseman approach his car from the rear and before he could sight the horse and rider, a shot rang out and a bullet whizzed past the auto. was fired at Jet Plane Explodes on Carrie Boxer; 8 Men Burned to Death WASHINGTON (UP1 The Navy announced today Hint a jel plane exploded aboard the carrier Boxer off North Korea yesterday, killing nine men, injuring many more, and seriously 'diminglng the 000-lon craft. Of the injured, only two were lisled as being in serious condition: Both are enlisted men. The Navy identified them as: Michael F. Hnimlfy Stevenson Courts Liberals, Eisenhower Conservatives WASHINGTON presidenlial nominees -strove lo consolidate, party ranks today as Adlai Stevenson courted liberals and -Dwight D. EisenhowW con- servatives. o t h reluctantly, however. They point- cdly they told could individual vole for Democrats Elsenhower without losing parly standing. And Gov. .lames F. Byrnes, a leader in Ihe southern rebellion against of here on Highway 80. Both vehicles were headin" west according to investigating state highway patrolman Louis Cochran The truck, travelling at a fairly high rate of speed, hit the trailer, splitting it wide open and going two-thirds of the way through it- Skid marks before the wreck were 52 feet and the trailer and car towing it were pushed 1-S3 feet. The vehicles ended- up on the right hand side of the road with the trailer 'pushed out of the way and the truck smashed into the side of the car. Clothes and per- sonal belongings from the trailer were strewn all along the high- way. The new trailer was almost completely damaged with the es- timated cost of almost 53.000. The car suffered S700 damage and the truck S200. Borden was talien to the Yuma General Hospital and held overnight for observa- tion. His wife suffered minor scratches and his son, Danny, 5, had minor bruises. Borden was cited for too much speed for the road conditions and following too closely. TOUGH GOING-With Ihc advent of !hc rainy as Ihoy slosh ihrough anfclc-dcep mud II, soldier wounded on "old Baldy." Ihc scene of recent i'J'.lor KH.IOT asainsl the Chinese in Kvica Object Pursued by Plane Is Sighted SACRAMENTO (UPl-A bright object, whicli moved up and down and sideways, was seen in the sky above here early today, with an airplane in pursuit, the sheriff's office reported. A sheriff's deputy said Mrs. Beatrice Wilbur, of Sacramento, first reported the. object over her home at a.m. and said she had been watching il lor 30 min- utes. Sheriffs officers Ed Keller and Neiglc Truss were dispatched to the scene. By then. Sacramento police-officers reported seeing an object heading south over Oak Park, in South Sacramento, with an airplane in pursuit. Soon afterward, a North Sacra- mento fireman reported seeing an- other object In the sky, wilh bril- liant red. white and "blue lights. The sheriff's office contacted McClcllan Field and was informed the Air Force had no planes ma- neuvering in the area. Eisenhower scheduled meetings i'be Truman administration, sairl 'nver "'ith 'n0{ llc fw led hjjthe us set' the opposed ius Len B. Jordan of Idaho and George T. publican national commilteeman for Utah. Both supported Sen. Robert A. Taft for the presidency, but they came to the Eisenhower camp ap- parently prepared to make peace and pledge their support. Stevenson, with Ihe rebellious Soulh reluming to the party (old. moved to strenglhcn his popular- ily wilh the northern liberal wing of the parly. Harriinan in iMcet The Democratic nominee went into a conference with Avcrell Harriman. thc New Deal Fair Deal presidential candidate who be- came a figurehead in thc "young Turk'1 liberal rebellion at the Dem- ocratic convention. Another Stevenson caller was Hie Democratic tickel in Nove ber. Sonlh Carolina, which led Dixiecral holt in 1013, th pace for other "doubtful" southern states to return lo the parly fold. Four slates Mississippi, Lou- isiana. Virginia and Texas still must decide at recessed stale con- ventions whether to support the party licket this fall. er lives at Miami, Fla., burned seriously, anil Ralph L. Finley, Fornfclt, Mo., In .a critical condi- tion wilh compound leg fraolures and mulliple injuries. Trapped by KliimcK Names of Ihe dead and olhor injured will be publishedv after next-of-kin have been notified. The navy said O.'i men trapped by flames jumped overboard and were picked up laler by small boats and helicopters. The plane exploded in Ihe hang- ar deck, starling a fire among stored planes. 12 of which were destroyed. Thc Navy said Ihe blast may have resulted from accumula- tion of gases in the plane's tail pipe aflcr il came in from a flight. The Boxer, a carrier of the Es- sex class, was one of Ihe first U.S. warships lo fighl in lhc Korean war. The explosion occurred as Ihe ship was operating CO miles oft Wonsan, North Korea. County registration is up over the 1950 figures, according lo Vernon C. Wright, county re- corder. I'lgures released this morning show that there arc 11.332 voters registered for the primary election Sept. For the primary two years ago, the figure was il.OiJIi. An Increase of 0-M registered Republicans made up the gains and offset a decline of 355 regis- tered Democrats. In no precinct however, did the Republicans come close to threatening the normal Democratic majority. Figures for HIM show that there are Democrats and Republicans That would give the Democrats a five and a half to one margin. In 1950 the margin was eight and a half to one. The recorder's office, announced that registration would again bo opened the day after the primary election and would stay open until Sept. 29. In 19SO, 292 persons added their names to the list between elections. A number of persons were turned nwuy Monday eve- ning when Ihe registration closed at o p.m. Those people and any other eligiblcs may register dur- ing the 20 day period between elections. Bluisdell Precinct No. 3 led the county registration with n total of voters. The Townsencl pre- clncL was next with 7-IS and (ol- owed by the Desmond precinct with 727. Townsend proved to ho. the. Democratic stronghold with li-IO registered while Desmond led the Republican registration wilh M3. Only In tiny Vicksburjr pro- i cinct did the Republicans come close lo the Democrats. There the count favored the Democrats Ily Precincts Local- registration- Democrats lo Republicans, by precincts ran- Vuma No.- 1, 308 to -10; Yuma No! i. 569 to D-l; Yuma No. 3 to 82; Yuma No. 4, 535 to Ml: Vunm No. j, 513 lo 111: Yuma No G JG2 to 51; Blaisdell No. 1 420 to 88; Blaisdell No. 2, 31S to -H Blaisdell No. 3, 612 to 100- Town- send, 640 to 100; Desmond, 071 Crmiu No. 2, 'in-t to 50: Somer- v" 'l05 to 75: Somcrlon No. 2, _'uJ to n; to Gadsden, 20.-! to IS; Wellton, 188 to .18; Roll. S2..to 30; Mohawk 31 to 2; 20. lo n: Hyder to 11; Wemlcn; 88 lo 8; Bouse. On to l.i; Laguana, 10-1 to 'M; Parker No. 1, 38-1 to (10: Parker No 2 The Hoard In Investigate. Navy command said board of Investigation has been ordered to determine the precise cause of Ihe explosion. The Navy said lhc Bonhommc Richard, another Essex class car- r. will relieve- the Boxer while il returns to Ihe Yokosuka, Japan. Naval Base for repairs. At thc beginning of Ihc Korean war Ihe Boxer had jusl returned lo Hie Wcsl Coast, from a six- month tour ol the west Pacific lor u scheduled overhaul. to 32; Quailzsltc, 140 to Vjcksburg, 25 to 21. and Salome 118 to 23. County wide. 111 persons reg- istered Non-Partisian, 25 listed themselves as Independents- five were Prohibitionists; three were Progressives and one was a So- cialist. LICENSED fCTWED Licensed to wed recently by James B. McLay, clerk of thc sii-. porior court were Alfred Gill, 19, and Carmen Valasqucz, 19, both of Yuma. Polling Places and Election Boards Named for 31 Precincts in County T IlO V f'mint V hurt nf i i lit' f cji r-.. 11___ 11 .__ The Yuma County board of ihy C. Slrierl. inspector; Kalhcr- pervisors has announced the se- j lection of voting places for the 1SW2 Sen. Blnir Moody of Michigan au- i elections and has appoinl- thor of the "young lovaltv lci1 t'crsons Yuina anil pledge which almost drove' the i llnia Ciiunty to act as polling of- South out of the national convcn- 1 TllcMC ilru 3! 1'i'ccincts in lion. The "harmony obvious allcmpt sessions" were by both candi- I Precinct No. 1 at the U. P. Folly Moloi dales to tighten their party ranks Adelaide Lorona. Is inspector. hitting Ihe campaign trail, "1L' arc Horace Rcdomln sometime around Labor Day. Neither candidate, however, was giving any tip-off on how or 
                            

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