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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: April 3, 1951 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - April 3, 1951, Yuma, Arizona                             Weather at Yuma Highest last 21 hours................S.'! Lowest last 24 hours Average high this Average low this date 57 Relative humidity at 11 YUMA 48 NUMBER 79 .Sen. Lodge Urges Truman To Ignore Senate, Send Troops YUMA, ARIZONA. TUESDAY, APRIL 3, Weotfcer Forecast FORECAST to Wednesday .Night: Variable high cloudiness this af- ternoon, tonight and in temperature. ARIZONA 79 Castle Dome To Be Goal of Final Bandollero Trip Next Sunday Says It Must Be Done For Sake of U. S. Security WASHINGTON, April 3- (U.R) Sen. Henry Cabot Lodge. R., said today that President Truman "must" ignore the Sen- ate's bill for control of U.S. troop commitments to Europe. He said this must be done in the interest of national security. Lodge told a reporter "the Scn- te did not know what it was do- ing" yesterday when it voted to demand approval of Congress be- fore any troops are sent 'to the Atlantic Pact Army beyond four divisions already earmarked. Lodge asked the Senate to re- verse itself and substitute a mineralized and both nature providing for consultation with I lovers and rock hunters should en- congressional committees in event joy a field day in this locality that is rich in the mining lore of Yuma county. The famous mining camp at Castle Doric in the Castle Dome mountains. -19 miles northeast of Yuma, will be the scene of the final bandollero tour of the season next Sunday, April 8, according to Wayne Cunningham, director of Yuma Parlts and Hecreation De- partment. This ore has been mined, accord- ing to legend, since before the day of the Spanish conquerors. Primitive, old mining equipment I has been found through the years 1 in this area by local prospectors, re-1 The mountains are both scenic further 'troops are sent. The move had little chance of success. Senate Democratic Leader Er- '''ncst W, McFarland, Ariz., said that though he was dissatisfied with the present form of pending troop resolutions, he would op- pose sending them back to com- mittee for an overhaul job. "I want to get this thing fin- ished UK soon us poMtlhle mid move on to KunicthliiK he will. He said that in effect the vote would 'prevent sending a XJnited Corps Headquarters to 'Europe for Gen. Dwight D. Eisen- hower's Atlantic Pact Army. That, he said, would force formation of a Corps Headquarters Command of foreign officers and men. "The only thing the president can do is to send a Corps Head- A hearty meal will be served at p.m. at a point approxi- mately one mile northwest of Castle Dome mining camp. Abe Marcus will be thu chef in charge. The road is well marked by a colorful metal sign on highway U5 about 40 miles out of Yuma. The auto caravan for this trek will leave the Yuma Chamber of Commerce Building Sunday at a.m. Tickets fur this event are on sale at the Chamber of Commerce office on 1st street. Tickets sell for per person for adults and .75 for children 6 to 12. Chil- dren under six are fed free of charge. The deadline for reser- vations is Thursday, Apr. Scouters Vote To Name New Martinez Lake Clubhouse Robert Eastlick Memorial The Executive Roard of the Im- perlal-Yuma Council, Boy Scouts of America, conducted its regu- lar meeting last nigh't at the Holtville Motor Inn in Holtville, Calif, with P. R. Campbell, Coun- quarlers contingent despite yes- cil president, presiding. terday's Lodge said. Reports were received from the He acknowledged that such a dislrict chairman of El Centre, step probably would bring roars Brawley, and Yuma, the most of disapproval from many mem-1 comprehensive of which was the 1 report of the Eastern District by Harry Goldsmith, district chair- man. The report was of all.sec- i of Congress. 1 The Senate yesterday added the demand to the 'pending .'troops- foV-Europc resolution. Hocked back by the blow, worried admin- istration leaders met to plan at- control over the troops program I by passing a law instead of ad- visory resolutions. Lodge, who served with a Corps tion and district activities since January. Arthur Halloran, council chait tempts to stop a Republican drive, man of Advancement and Awards, to give Congress hard and fast reported on Courts of Honor held in every section of the council. He further reported that his com- mitlee is working: on a ritual to be used at all future Courts of Headquarters during part of Honor. He also commended Troop World War II, said that under the 61, sponsored by the Crane school, Tlnew amendment such a .group ror their fine advancement record numbering about men and, established at the last Yuma sec- needed for every three divisions sent overseas, could not be sup- the Pact Army. As a re- sult a Foreign Corps Headquar- ters would have to be used, he said. He pointed out 'that it was lack of corps communication facilities and direction which cost the Brit- ish the strong point of Tobruk during the struggle with the and Italians in North 'TAfrica in the last war. tion Court of Honor. The new Nn- tional Council recommendations for changes in the ranks, of S'tar, Life, and Eagle Scout will be made available to the field in the I near future as the Imperial- Yuma IN Department uf nminced (inlay I'irsl Class .liihn the I'.S. nmrlni Delense im- Ilial Private 10. 'if hii.s liren wounded in Kiirciin fighting. No other Informalliin regarding his cunilUlnn was available, llanry Is li graduate ill Yl'IIS, and former slate president nf Arizona's Future runners of America, lie Is (In- sun Mr. and airs. W. C'. llanev Viimn. Boy Hurt As Bikes Collide Bob Salisbury, about 12 years of age, was injured painfully early today when his bicycle collided with' another in the 600 block on avenue. City Patrolmen Ray Snailum and Lowell Haley investigated. They reported that the young- sters were riding to school to- gether. In going around a parked vehicle, a pedal of one bike got tangled up in the front wheel of the other. Young Salisbury was rushed to the Yuma General hospital by ambulance for treatment of a cut f on his jaw. His parents. Mr. and Mrs. Tom Salisbury wore in Los Angeles and Bob was staying with friends. Council has been selected as an experimental council to make these requirements optional. Truman Wigg, council chairman of camping and activities report- ed on the progress made at Mar- tinez Lake this past weekend when nearly 100 men and explor- ers participated in a work camp. The building is near completion due to the 'time, effort, and ma- terials donated by many Scbuters and friends of Scouting in the Council area. At the request of the Eastern District and with the permission of Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Eastlick the building will be named the Robert Eastlick Mem- orial Building, and will be dedi- cated at a future date. J. T. Eastlick, council chair- man of finance, presented the ov- erall financial picture, and stated Army Hiring YTB Civilian Workers At Yuma Office Beginning today, preliminary in- f tervicws for applicants for 200 civilian jobs at Yuma Test Branch will take place at the Yuma of- fice of the Arizona Stale Employ- ment Service. 301 E. 2nd street, it was announced by F. L. Made- man, an Army civil service em- ployee from Fort MacArthur. San Pedro. Calif. Miss Helen Dempster, personn- el officer at Fort MacArthur. is in charge of the hiring of civilian Capt. Tommy Long Is Transferred To Test Branch Captain Tommy Long has been transferred from the Presidio. San Francisco, to the Y U m a Test Branch and will arrive here April 5 or shortly thereafter, accord- ing to word received by his father. B. W. (Wcs) Long of Yuma. He will have charge of supplies at the Army Engineers base which was reactivated last Sunday. Col. C. H. Haislcy is the commanding officer of YTB. that the money received fro m the Yuma Community Chest was the full share of the budget sub- mitted to this community to pro- mote and further the program of Scouting. Upon Mr. Eastlick's recommendation and unanimous approval of the board, the Robert Easllick Memorial Fund, which has reached the amount of will be turned over to the council for building" and maintenance ol the Martinez Lake Camp. Also the If-lOO awarded to the Eastern District 'tfifoiigh'the funds feceiv: cd by the fashion show conducted by E. F. Sanguinettt Com'panj was. vo'ted into thia same fund. Roland Dye, deputy regiona scout executive, conducted an.in- formal charter review in behali of the National Ctuncil. Follow- ing the review Mr. Dye stated that he would be most happy to recommend renewal of the Coun- cil Charter. Mr. Dye was accom- panied by Jerry Thomas of San Diego, vice chairman of the Southern California lec'tipn of Re gioh Twelve. Tucson Bank Bandit Nabbed LOS ANGELES, April William Roy Miller, 49, was ar- rested here today as a suspect in the holdup of the Southern Arizona Bank and Trust Company in Tucson Feb. 13. Miller, sought throughout the Southwest since he held up the bank and escaped with a sackful of coins and currency weighing 35 pounds, was spotted by two Los Angeles police officers who recognized him from photographs. The Federal Bureau of Investi- gation office later positively iden- tified Miller from fingerprints. He was taken into custody only two weeks after his photo was distributed to the nation's law en- forcement agencies by the FBI in a general identification order. Police officers Jack S. Gable and Melvin E. Harner were cred- ited with the suspect's arrest. They said Miller apparently was drunk when they picked him up. He talked freely about the holdup but later denied some of his statements. Miller walked into the Tucson bank 10 minutes before closing Feb. 13. pulled out a snub-nosed revolver and ordered a vaul't teller to give him the money he was counting. The loot included in nick- els which Miller placed in a paper bag. He stuffed the other money in a canvas money bag and ran onto the street. The paper'bag broke, spilling the nickels. Most of it was recovered, Gen. MacArthur Jeeps 5 Miles Into North Korea U.S. Forces Surge Across Parallel 38 TOKYO. April 3- (U.R) U. S. lurces surged across Ihe Mth Parallel In slrength fur the first lime tndny In a defiant challenge norc than a half-million Reds n spring cuunler-of. TO WIELD Smlt president' nf Yiinm dun, will open the first business session ut the Lions club state- wide district coiiventiiin In Yuma April I2-IU-I4. Some Lions and wives are expected in yunia for the Jaycees To Meet Wednesday Noon The first in a series of three tvcekly noon meetings of the Yuma t mussing fenslvi'. Strom; contingents of an Ameri- can division swept across the pre- war frontier on a lO-mlta front In Western Korea above Seoul. Chi- ni'se rear-guards screening the Communist build-up further north nil up only slight resistance. At tin; same lime, the Korean Capital Division on the Mist coast first Allied division across (he parallel extended its hridgehcitd In the Communist lomeland to more than IS miles. (ii'ii. Douglas MHcArthur vls- Ked Month Koreans mi hln 15th flying visit In the Korean uwl jivpcd 15 miles nor III "f tin- piimlli'l In wllhln film .Minis nf ihi-lr northernmost 1111- slllons. On his return to Tokyo tonight, the supreme United Nations com- .nandiT reported tactical condi- tions "favorable" along the entire 1-10-mile Korean front. Our troops still maintain the he said. "Enemy Weakness in the air, on the sea, and in the lack of artillery and heavy weapons for the ground are being rigidly exploited by our "Our strategy remains un- changed and is based on maneu- ver, not "positional warfare.' His indicated that the 8th Army would not be content to dig in and wait for the expect- ed Red spring offensive, but would strike boldly into Commu- nist North Korea' in an attempt to keep the enemy off balance. Accompanying MacArthur was Paul C. Smith, editor of the San Francisco Chronicle and a veteran of both Navy and Marine service in Worjd War It. "The only talk T heard about was Smith said after attending a couple of briefings of Junior Chamber of Commerce will South Korean troops on the cast be held Wednesday noon at the coast. He said the South Wet Congress Will Not Vote Over W Billions in New Taxes WASHINGTON, April 18-Vi year olds and create a ongresslonal tax writers predlii- emergency universal m Hilary ed today that Freshen! Truman training program, do well if gels us much us.I J. William Fulbrlghl, In new taxes. U. Ark., endorsed President Tru- Mr. Truman now Is asking for mini's plan to reorganize Ihe Re- In new taxes tyiput construction Flmince Corp., under he' defenae'-pfogranrbn n pay-its- we-go basis. Secretary of Treasury John W. inyder told the House Ways nnd tleann Committee yesterday that L appears It will not be necessary State Cafe. The purpose of the series is to elect officers and a board of dir- ectors for the coming Jayccc year. Under the by-laws only active members are allowed to hold of- fice but all members including inactive or senior were urged to.- day by President Paul Dawson to turn out for the election meet- ings. All three meetings will bo held on Wednesday noons at the State. have said the "nvorv intention Koreans of going U.S. Jet Pilots Down 3 MIG Jets In Aerial Battle U.S. 5lh Air Force Headquar- ters, Korea, April 3 (U.R) American jet pilots shot down three Soviet-built MtG-lB jet fighters and damaged three more in a 30-minute aerial battle just south of the Manchurian border today, the 5th Air Force reported. The battle started when 11 enemy jets attacked a single American F-80 Shooting Star south of Sinuijii. at the mouth of the Yalu river boundary between Manchuria and Korea. A flight of F-80s led by Lt. Oil. Bruce Ilinton. Washington. D.C.. went to the aid of the American plane and soon was heavily en- gaged with 30 to 40 Communist jets. and taking" objectives north oi the places MncArlhur visited, indi- cated the coast drive will be con- .inued. Only a few hours earlier. Arlliur hud reported In his morning communique flint lnc Chinese and Korean Reds were gathering divisions, their greatest potential of thi: war. for an attack on advanc- ing hill ontiimnlirn-cl United Nations forces. It might prove the final Com munist attempt to throw thi United Nations out of Korea North Korean Premier and Su p r e m e Communist Commando Kim 11 Sung was reported by th Chinese Communist radio at Pel ping to have told newsmen at hi field headquarters near the front "We are confident that we wi drive the aggrssors out of Ko rea." Nine Hurt In Riot at Church ALLERTON. la.. April 3 Rev. Sydney Austin said to day he would quit as pastor of th Alicrton Church of Christ wher nine persons were hurt in a blood riot Sunday. Guy Gouglmour. leader of a riv- al faction among the 84-year-old church's parishioners, said howev- er, he would seek a court order to force Austin out within 30 days. The church belongs to the Dis- ciples of Christ denomination. TRAPrED-Eiiglnccrs ponder the problem of two M-4 tanks that are stuck at a b'ildm north of Uljongbu. The tank collunm! the bridge while l.rylni! to ciuss, and theTorwurd tarRl mlM __________________when II tried to pull the first out of ns wlf-inade trim. o -ask for a lux boost of as originally recommended. DEVELOPMENTS In other congressional develop- nents: Democratic lea- iers were confident of beating a Republican move to send the rOops-for-Eurqpe .resolutions back o 'c o.m i't.t e e. Administration suffered "a set-back yestcr- lay- when-'Republicans and some Democr'ats approved an amend- nciit.' to' the: "'resolutions which woilld. ask congressional approval before four more Am- erican.'division! are sent into the Atlantic Pact Army. Republicans vere determined now to send the whole committee and get a bind- ng law reported out. Carl Vinson of .he House Armed Services Com- mittee said Russia, soon will have enough atomic bombs to lay waste many American cities. He ;ave tiic warning in opening de- bate on the House bill lo draft Senate Investigat- ions Subcommittee said It la ready 1( asked, to look Into former Rep. Joseph. E. Casey's profitable deal in buying and selling surplua gov- ernment tankers. Sheriff To Patrol For Hay Thieves Yuma-area farmers, sheriff, fficc and supervisors yesterday iscusscd an annual problem that corns to be worse than ever this Want To Give Mickey The Bum's Rush NPA Orders Controls On Lead To Meet Expected Shortage WASHINGTON, April (U.R1 The government today put con- trols on lead to meet a ton drop in 1951 supplies. The control order, issued by the National Production Authority limits manufacturers of lead pro ducts to their consumption rati of the first half of JOfiO. It also directed manufacturer? to accept up to 20 percent of the available supply in defense orders Inventories were reduced fron 60 days to 30 days tinder th regulation. Lead is used largely in manu facture of pipes and other con struction supplies. The estimated production of do me.stic lead mines is expected t increase by tons in 1951 and scrap recovery is likely to ho equal to that of 1950, NPA said. But imports probably will drop about tons. PHOENIX. Ariz.. April vcaled he obtained a quarter in- Arizona druggists flooded the State Pharmacy Board loday with to prevent West Coast gam- bler Mickey Cohen from going into Madcman were at the Yuma Em- ployment office today while Miss Zillah Weimcr did another portion of the work at the Test Branch. All sorts of jobs are open at YTB. Mademan said, including drivers, secretaries, stenograph- ers, carpenters, telephone opera- tors and plumbers. YTB was reactivated last Sun- day and the commanding officer. Col. C. H. Haislcy. announced the Branch would be in full swing hv Mm- 1st. said letters and' telephone calls were pouring into his office "be- seeching" the board to take action to stymie tiie dapper ex-book- J maker's new business venture. They nil us wnnl us Id keep Cohen nut of Slewarl said. He quoted one letter from a dntggiM which read in part, "This is sure }i slap al Arizona druggists lo have Tolii'ii over ere." In Ixis Angeles yesterday the re tercst in two Tucson stores with out putting up a cent. "All I did'.' sc haid, "was promise to, stand behind a cigar counter eight] hours a day." The Arizona Pharmacy Board.] Stewart said, was definitely inter- nniHt approve any (ransaelmn which involves a chaliKi- of in per crnl or more of Hie store's interest. He said Ihr tninnl's hands would In- tied if ('ulim turns nut to In- nothing more than a high-salaried clerk. "Bui if he' has a controlling in- "I'ni a "and I Chicago man (Cohen's brother 1 Harry) when along cnmc his brother (Mickey) and then some- one else." "Then hundred? of people began ear: Hay stealing. Relief Is Promised To Flood Areas My 1TMTKI> PRESH Fair, sunny weather promised relief-from floods In most of tha Midwest but, swollin rlveli still threatened soutltweantern Iowa nnd southern Alabama. Flood waters receded slowly elsewhere in the Midwest, Sou'.h and East, leaving millions of dol- lars worth of damage and 11 dead, Tlie Tombigce river was rising In southwest Alabama and'was expected to reach a crest of 65. 1'ce't late this.week. Rivers-were falling elsewhere In the state. Families returned to tnelrh'omes in New Jersey as raln-swijllen rivers dropped one foot .every four or five hours. Floods that stale over the weekend estimated In the Dakotas, scattered' The board of supervisors wore wore still reported, but: Neither- 'Ctllioned by 111 Yuma.: county men reported that the dangerous the board'to in- lissouri river upix a sick mnn." said Epstein, was negotiating with a csted in Cohen's activities behind tercst. we'll give him a good calling me on Hi'.' phone. Now the cigar counter. over." llo said. "We ''m just he added. "If "We're keeping an eye on the people louse with morphine and wants to buy a couple I transaction but can't do anything! other dangerous iliucs at their'of drug stores. I've got them for jyet because it hasn't been official-'fingertips unless !hey arc. equipped sale." ly brought to our attention. Stew-1 to handle them." Tucson and Merchant As- I In Tucnn. a Leonard Epstein, social inn officials were up in arms have to measure, the present owner of tv.-o drug-. over Cohen's contemplated move. Temperatures Around the Nation art said. "Cohen up to some pretty high standards j stores said contrary lo Cohen's' Thcv indicated the city and when his application to operate] announcement the deal was fir county deserved "a better'class of And he indicated h.' citizen." They don't want Cohen a store comes before us." Stew- from settled, art added. 'was looking Strwart explained thr bvard for other potcr.linl Tucson nnd plan to do every- thing to keep him cut. Boston Chicago ............................IS Denver ..............................56 DCS Moines ........................-13 Detroit Max Mln 15 11 30 33 27 Kort Worth Los Angeles Miami New Orleans New York St. Louis Son Francisco Washington Flagstaff Tucson Phoenix YumA ................71. .........70 .52 66 ................Sfl ................81 ................83 B9 47 10 34 39 21 46 52 esidenls, asking tract the sheriff to establish ,a latrol in rural districts to guard aystacks. Bales of hay. some- hues in large quantities, have iccn disappearing lately, and 'with higher prices and increased icmand for hny in prospect, a nucli higher Incidence of crimes )f this nature may be he petition said. John Gardner, farmer, appeared rcfore the supervisors, who called n Sheriff Jim Washum to discuss the problem. Gardner explained .hat roadside slacks of hay nrc especially vulnerable to thieves, because they can drive through .he areas in daylight, spotting the convenient stacks and rcturn- ng after dark to steal all or part of them. Sheriff Wnslium said he would establish a patrol system to check all hay trucks and lo guard stacks wherever possible. Names on Ihe petition were: R. J. Engler, W. L. Gunlock. John Gardner, Elliott Waits. F. W. Culgrave. J. E. Stanley. S. R, Blake. Hcrchcl Wright, R. H Frnm. Clarence V. Spencer, El- don I'aulsen, R. C. Walker. C Watson. Herbert L. Morris. Favi West. Eldon H. Jones, Hermat Itecves. Earl E. Johnson, am Travis W. White. Mrs. Verna F. Mabcry wa: awarded the contract to furnish meals to prisoners at Yum; county jail for the coming year a .15 cents per meal. Other bidder included Clifford Brown, Hcnr; Tays and Jack Malone. Electors of elemental-; school district No. 19 will vot April 28 on the issuance of OUO in school bonds to financ construction of a new scrim j building on the present grounds I and the board approved the elcc I tion date. i The board rejected the only hi received for purchase of estimated 25 tons of scrap iro accumulated by the county high way department, and will advertise, the junk for sale. Th only bid was from Yuma Pip Steel and Salvage company, an was for Present were board chairman M. G. Minikcn: Supervisors Otis Shipp and V- H. Thompson: Legai ppearcd to be lev- Ing off. The latest weather casualty ras Ernest S. Shurtlcff, .55, Pike- llle, K.y., who was killed when Is plane crashed Into a mountain-' )p near Panther, W. Va.. yester- ay 'while flying through heavy ain and fog. Two inches of snow In western 'cnncsscc forced postponement of he annual "Mule Day" celebra- ion at Paris first ime in years that bad weather ad delayed the event. Counsel R H. Wcstover: and floated )n Charge Operating, Taxi Minus License A wildcat taxi service was put nil of business recently when its ipernl'ir landed before Justice of, .he Peace Erscl Byrd. Lorenzo Villanueva, Abiang, Fil- pino worker from Salinas, pleaded guilty to operating a taxi- without a license. He was fined ?50 and given 30 days in jail. The jail .sentence was suspended later .vit.h the provision that Abiang eavc town. The complaint against the aborcr was signed by Clarence P. Graham. U.S. Border Patrol inspector. Abi.ing was caught hauling Mexican laborers. Youths Bound Over On Dyer Act Charges A pair of Arkansas youths, ar- estcd here last week by sheriff's deputies, have been bound over to U. S. District court on charges of violating the federal Dyer Act. They appeared recently before Commissioner John A. McGuire. They are Williams C. Simmons.23. nnd Everett Harvey. 23. they ad- mitted to dcruUo.? that they stole the vehicle fhr.y were driving in Occansidc. California after aban- doning one stolen in Houston. Tex- as. They wtfe taken into custody on the Yuma mesa, where they .had parked to sleep during thr. day. They told officers they planned to steal another car here that niRtit. They were held for invalidation and turned over to Bob Moody. llwai FBI agent.   

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