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Yuma Daily Sun: Monday, December 4, 1950 - Page 1

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - December 4, 1950, Yuma, Arizona                             Eight Candidates Seeking Four City Council Seab In Tomorrow's Election Highest last Lowest last 24 hours....................55 Average high this date................70 Average low this date..................41 Relative humidity at 11 Till It WtoriMr Foracost FORECAST 'to Tuesday Night: Generally cloudy this afternoon, tonight and Tuesday. Little chance in temperature. VOLUME 277 Ml or YUMA, ARIZONA, MONDAY. DECEMBER 4, 1950 TWO SECTIONS-FIRST SECTION Polls Open at 8 For Runoff Contest Baiky, Neweomtr, Phillips and Vanwr Are 'Recommended' On Anonymous Circular The political battle enters the final round of the year Tuesday when Yumans go to the polls to select city councilmen. The doors of the polling places swing open at 8 a.m. and close 4 p.m. Voters narrowed down the field of council candidates from to eight in the municipal primary but failed to give any vole. A surprise development of 'the campaign was an effort to pro- mote a "united" ticket of four candldntes. City election today reported they had received in the malls a printed leaflet recommend- ing a slate of four candidates for city council. The recommended candidates In- two of the three incumbents, >hn B. Bailey and Floyd New- comer; and two of the five'chal- lehgers, Walter L. Varncr, Sr., and Mrs. Helen Phillips. circular, which was anony- mous, read: "Clean city govern 15 majority Floods, Cold Plague Much Of the Nation Ui Asks UN Assembly Take Up China Aggression Case VOLUME 277 incut results when the people vote only for candidates of well known character and ability. Recom- mended to your attention as pos- sessing 'these needed qualities are the'following candidates for City Xouncil: John B. Bailey, Floyd E. WTewcomer, Walter L. Varner, Sr., Mrs. Helen Phillips. Vote Good Government December 5th." Contacted regarding the cir- cular, all four o'f the "recommend- ed" candidates declared they had no prior knowledge of the cir- cular. Statements from each of the four secured this morning by 'the Sun are as follows: John B. Bailey: "I was not con- sulted regarding this circular. 1 am running as an independent Floyd Newcomer: "I know noth- ing about it. That's something for the voters to decide, who to elect to the city council." Walter A. Varncv, Sr.: "I renlly knew nothing about it, until this morning fvhcn they were being re- ceived In the mail." Mrs. Helen Phillips: "I know nothing about it. I was not aware of it being circulated; where it came from, I don't know."   instruction team. All. and demonstration National Guard. Air been taken from the area of Maiden Lane and 2nd street. It bore a California license plate, he said. Within 20 minutes of the first report. Bob Hoover of Yuma re- ported that his 1948 Oldsmnbile Stcvr Pmmvlvaittn four-door sedan had been taken I C'nimnmM Irwtpr, and tww a- from Gila street. His auto also' tnnttc wen hHltrtal fas biue. It bears Arizona li- hy a frttanl grawl Jnrr twlar ;nsc H6527. for contempt of Congresn. Reserve and Army Reservists are invited to attend. (U.RI WASHINGTON, may save his sonic day. All this is part of a traffic safe- ty program being staged in Yuma this week by the traffic safety division of the Arizona Highway Department. Andrew L. Case, sta- te supervisor, is in town to run the program. A 55 prize will be given for the lucky jaywalker spotter each day for four days beginning tomor- row Daniels and The Emporium have contributed mer- chandise awards. Dec. 4 (U.R) British Prime Minister Clement R. Attlee arrived today for monen- tous' talks with President Truman, and said the United States and Great Britain must stand together to maintain peace and resist ag- gression. d Attlee stepped from his plane at National Airport here, he was met by President Truman and a number of cabinet members, and top diplomats. Then Attlee told reporters: "My aim in these talks is to align our policies in the new'and troubled situation in the world and to find the means of upholding what we both know to be right." He said that Russia and the Cominform are wasting time in trying to split the United States and Great Britain. Attlee said that the democratic way of life is in peril and "we must take, counsel." BULLETIN! WASHINGTON, military" spokesman said to- ilay retreating American forces in Korea apparently arc holding to most of their equipment and arms. Scout District Board Of Review Is Slated This Evening at 5 There will be an Eastern Dis- trict Boy Scouts Board of Review to approve applications for Life Eagle and Eagle Palms at the Yuma County Chamber of Com- merce building in Yuma tonight at 5 o'clock, District Chairman Frank Hobart announced today. Courts of honor will be held at Welllon Dec. 11 and Yuma Dec 29. The annual meeting and elec lion of officers for the Eastern District will be held at Clymer's in Yuma Dec. 18 at p.m. Arizona Building Contractors made another effort to reduce Ari- xona'i iky-high industrial insur- ance before adjourning their third annual convention in Yuma lait weekend. 'At of an interesting parterdtectnnfcm which' listeS'-from 10 a.m. Saturday until early af- ternoon, convention delegates unanimously approved a resolution calling upon the Arizona 'legisla- ture-elect to a "health and afety ;code." Spokesmen for the association wid that Arizona is-one of. the ew states which do not have such ndustrial safety codes, which'-are esigned to ac- idents. By.. reducing, the fre- uency of accidents, the .associa- ion believes that the rates of Ari- oria's 'Industrial Insurance can be owered.' This new resolution followed one oted on the first day f "the convention, which called ipori the legislatu.re-eiect to place reasonable" limits upon the amount of average monthly earn- rigs which should be used as t -asis for computing injury bene its, and for a "reasonable" limil m the amount which could bi paid out in death benefits, unde: Arizona industrial.insurance. Rates for Arizona industrijl. in surance today are among the highest in the nation, and man state, leaders and industrialist believe that these high rates han dicap the state in its effort to at tract new industries and thus pro vide more job opportunities fo Arizona workers. Wording of the proposed "healtl and safety code" which the ABC THE ROAD IACK: Weary troops of the U. S. Second Iniamry Uivir-ion. some wmmcW.' pan'' after out a Chinese ambush near Kunuri. sks the Arizona legislature to mact, was left to the legislature o decide, after-' itudy of other such codes In effect In other states. One spokesman' for the awocli- Jdn Bald-that the-action by the btinaihV iJraaKlhg'for a safety code represented a turn- about In attitude. He said ,that 'ive yeais ago, the .contractors would the enactment of a state-enforced industris.! isafe- :y code. The change in'attitude, he said, reflects the builders' rec- ognition of the fact insurance rates have been an ex- iensive' and burdensome part pf doing business, and that whatever steps arc necessary to reduce the 'ates should be taken immediate; .W. E. Naumanh of Tucson Is the hew state president of ABC, elected Saturday with a new slate ?Iuding three Yumans. -Plain. H.v Pi Adams M. G. Miniken, all.of were elected to the board of; directors. Other'of fleers are: First, vice 'president, L. Forbes, Phoenix: second vice pres- ident, Cecil Moore of Tucson; treasurer, Louis Karpe of Phoe- nix; other directors, John Putter of Tucson and E. J. Wasielewskl of Phoenix, retiring president.' Official convention activities concluded with a dinner dance at the Yuma Elks club Saturday night, at which the retiring presi dent praised the Yuma chapter of ABC for a top-notch convention. Site of the 1951 meeting was not selected. Yanks Cut Off In Northeast Part Of Korea 'TOKYO, Skills ttnlted "Nations abandoned Py.ongyRng.and left It 't'etror Monday Invasion army expected soon" to total more .than men. Y In Northeast .'-i reunifST- troops of thevU.S. 1st -Marine Division and 'two the Army 7th regrouped for a; final, 50-mile smash through Uie walls of a Chinese Irap barring their way to Harhhung on the cast coast. Marine the Marines had killed of the '-Chosin Reservoir. area, and was confident the: 2nd Spraying Is Begun In Yuma Fly Control Program Spray crews of the health de- ed production. But littered areas partment's fly control project are making a second tour of the Yuma area after completing the treat- ment begun in October. The procedure of the first spray- ing, the application of a residual effect insecticide to resting and breeding spots of flie.3. is being repeated to provide further pro- Allen ter.tion. Project Supervisor D. MayfieW said. Garbage cans, privies, animal shelters and pens and other places most frequented by flies are in- cluded in the treatment. The five men handling the spniying are Jackson Malonev. Edward Olcata. Howard Hall. William Jack- son and Anthony Valcnzuela. The spraying is a supplement to the .vork being done by the health de- partment to improve sanitary con- ditions in the area and thereby reduce the amount of flv breed- ing. Weekly surveys nf have shown that careful use of fly-tight garbage cans, installed by house- holders during the summer, rcduc- resulting from uncovered or over- flowing garbage cans provided a source of fly breeding, May- field explained. Horse corrals and other live- stock pens interfere seriously with fly control efforts unless frequently, the survey showed s, Manure, spread in a thin layer as on lawns, dries quickly and can- not produce flics as it would if left in unclcaned animal pens or scraped ito piles. May-field said. .-The 'estimate" of. flan Invasion army, came ;n a new appraisal from -Gerii Douglas MacArthur, A communi- que siid Red Chinese already had thrown front-line troops' into the fightir.g, had massed more: in rear areas and. was bringing .up more. In another, and fanbnMnj development in the mirthenst- ern Korean fighting, the Chin- ese wounded Ameri- can soldiers of. 'the. Division Monday, and sent them back to American lines with a saying Chinese troops were ing back to Manchuria." The message said the Chinese were holding American officers prisoner, but would send them to San Francisco from Shanghai. The new to the Chinese puzzle came only days after screaming, fanatical Chinese troops had ambushed a truck convoy carrying wounded soldiers of the same division and slauphr tcred helpless with grenades, burning gasoline and machinegun fire. Her? was a picture" of the.- Korean fighting front from west to east: PYONGYANG: The Commun- ists captured Sunchon. 28 miics northeast of Yyonpyanp, and 27 miles northwest, the two northern defense anchors of former capital. Only the British 20th Brigade remained north of Pyongyang as a rear- guard Monday, and a part of the Firemen Meet Tonight The regular monthly meeting of Yuma Volunteer Fire Depart- ment will be held at 8 p.m. tonight i in the firemen's quarters of the city hall. Firemen report than an excep- tionally gooii feed is in the offing p.f'ir the- business Offer per copy for 2 Sun issues The Daily Sun needs copies of two more back issues, and is offering per copy for the first three complete copies of the April 27 and May 25 (1950) issues brought to the Sun office today or tomorrow. The Yum taiy Sun 241 (Continued on Page 6) SANTA Time and store stocks wait for no lazy shoppers.   

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