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Yuma Daily Sun: Thursday, October 13, 1949 - Page 1

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - October 13, 1949, Yuma, Arizona                             Highest last 21 hours 93 Lottos! lust 21 Average high this date.......... V1; Average low this date............59 Itvla'.ivt humidity at 11 dl'.i VOLUME 241 681 or 41? AND THE YUMA, ARIZONA SENTtNa YUMA. ARIZONA. THURSDAY. OCTOBER 13, 194? Wtoriwr Forecast KyiYi'aot FrMav night: Scat- tered high clouds aftoiivxtn. tonight ami Friday. Uttl-1 TWO SECTION VOLUME 84-, NUMBER 241 Navy Chief Blasts At Unification 12 Killed In Crash of B-50 .In England Bombs Mast Huge Crater on Farm ISLKIIAM, KnglanU. Oct. 13 (U.R) -An American Air Force "world girdling" B-50 bomber on a live bombing mission crashed j ,and exploded in a heavy fog to- j day. killing all 12 crew members.' The big four-engine plane, bound I the bomb range on Heligoland! from the U. S. Air Force Base at I Ijtketiheath, plunged to the ground on a farm one -'mile this Cambridgeshire village. "11 sounded like the war all over said Abel Watkins, a farmer who lives six miles away from the crash scene. The force of the explosion of bombs aboard the plane ripped a huge crater in the earth and sent shafts of flame shooting in all t directions. Several nearby hay- stacks were set afire. i The flames were extinguished by fire engines and police rushed to the scene from neighboring towns in Cambridgeshire The crcsh occurred at a.m. a.m. EST) at a po'int about 55 miles north of London. Visibility at the site of the crash was only one-eighth of a mile because of fog. but Air Force did not immediately nt- tribute the crash entirely to the fo-r. thirst reports said there were 13 men aboard the plane but an Air Force spokesman said the crew numbered 12 and that all -were killed. Although the B-50 is a modified bomber of the. B-29 type designed especially to carry the atom bomb, the planes based in Britain are understood to have been engaged in live bombing tests with con- vcntional missiles. j The huge ships 'are" capable of flying around the world if refuel- ed in flight, a technique demon- strated recently by a B-50 which made a non-stop flight around the J An air force spokesman con- firmed that the plane was carry- ing a load of live bombs. He said he did not know how heavy the bomb load was   pint lire, Jerry Cannon, Bill Brand and BUI Krjuer, were imiihle li> make thi- trek Ix'CHust! they are busy gu into tin: cuttle business fur themselves. Kohrrt Till, oil (he left, is in college. Chapter iiilviser C. Crawford is holding the nnitnal. Attlee Rejects Plan for British Election This Fall Shirley Temple Plans Divorce From John Agar HOLLYWOOD, Oct. 13 Shirley Temple, the be-dimplcd y star who grew up into a glamour girl, said today she has LONDON. Oct. 13 Minister Clement Attlee today re- jected Winston Churchill's chal- lenge to hold a general election this year. Attlee issued an announcement saying there would no election before 1950. He explained that he did so to alleviate speculation and attendant "disturbing effects on trade and industry." The announcement meant that the Labor Government intended to weather the storm of domestic criticism caused by devaluation of the pound and take its chances at the polls next summer. By that time the Labprites will have accomplished their major project, nationalization of the iron and steel industry. The bill be conies law next spring. Churchill challenged the govern- ment to take its economic poli- cies before the voters in an early general during the recent Parliament debate on devaluation. But Attlee said no. divorce actor John "crying about it for minister's residence at No. 10 Downing" street said: "Haying regard to the disturb- ing effecta'of trade and industry and on the national effort to the continuance, .of speculation an early general election, i to th. Concert Member Drive Proving Successful prime minister'thinks it right to inform the country of his decision not to advise His Majesty to dis- solve Parliament this year." Kevin Net-tins; Attlee's decision was readied in a full cabinet meeting this morn- ing attended by the top leaders of the Labor Party, including Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin, who returned yesterday from the United States.' The prime minister's statement indicated the Labor Government will carry out its full term in of- fice until next summer, when elec- tions will have to be held by law. The last election was in 1915 and elections must be held every five years. decided to Agar after the last two weeks." "I'm so confused and unhap- py'." the curly-haired actress said, gulping back a sob. "I doti't know whether it's Jack's fault or mine. All T know is, there's no possible chance of a reconciliation." A Personal Matter Miss Temple, who was a 17-year- old bride four years ago'in one of the town's fanciest Valentine-style weddings, said the thing that blew up her marriage is' "a strictly per- sonal tiling between Jack and me." don't want to discuss it." she said firmly. "But I wouldn't call our marriage a 'Hollywood1 mar- riage. This is something: that happens to lots of people. "It would'vc happened to us if we'd been living any place. Hol- lywood had nothing to do with it. "We've both tried very hard. But it wouldn't work." Shirley said she hopes cvcry- l body won't make too much of a fuss. "I'd like to keep'this as digni- fied and quiet as she said. Her attorney. George Stahlman said the suit would probably be filed this afternoon under the standard movie-colony charge of "mental cruelty." This, according to friends of the young couple, means Agar neg- lected his pretty young wife and their two-year-old daughter. Linda Susan. Sheriff's Meet on Main Street Frank Brown, captain' of the Yuma County Mounted Sheriff's Posse, announced today that all members of the organization arc to meet at the north end of main street one-half hour before parade time Saturday afternoon. Chamber Directors Meet Friday Noon A statement issued from the. Copper Mine Workers Taking Strike Vote J Lord Boyd Orr s Awarded Nobel 49 Peace Prize t MIAMI, Oct. 13 than 1.500 members of the CIO Mine. Workers Union voted today on the question of authorizing a strike against three Miami area copper plants. Orvlllc Larson, union tional vice-president, said ho was "confident thnt a majority would authorize a strike." However. Larson said n strike was not imminent since, negotia- tions with the companies would continue, and if necessary tin Federal Conciliation Service would be called in. The three companies affectcc arc the Miami Copper Company the International Smelting and Refining Company and the Inspir ation Consolidated Copper Com pany. The union is asking a 23-cenis an hour wage increase for nil categories of workers, but the company has rejected the demand on me grounds thai the mining industry is in a "marginal eco- nomic condition." Only days remain for Yu ma citizens to obtain their mem- berships for the concert season of 1D49-50 in the Yuma Commun- ity Concert Association. No ap- plications can be accepted aftei Saturday noon, and single admis- sions to the concerts will not be sold. Officials of the association re- port that with the campaign week half gone, the response to the emhcrship drive has been very ratifying. It seems assured that e Yuma group, which is cele- its tenth anniversary this ear, will be able to bring back ne of the most popular attrac- ons in its Ballet arianto of Mia Slavcnslia. This ance group is visiting the South- -est in the spring, and a teiita- ve date for a Yuma performance as been secured, subject to the ompletion of a 'successful incni- icrship campaign. Residents who have not joined ind have not been contacted by loncert association workers may ccure their memberships at con- :ert headquarters in the Minson iliialc Studio tile court- house all day Friday and unti noon on Saturday. Arrangements for "Tlie City of Yuma" day, set for this Saturday are really in high gear with city officials and other prominent per sons going all-out to iviake this celebration one of the most mem- orable in the history of the city. The gala affair is to honor en- durance fliers Woody Jongeward and Bob Woodhouse, who recently brought unbuyabie nation wide publicity to Yuma by cracking the j world's record and then setiiig up a new one of .'112-1 hours, j A day-long celebration will be semi-climaxi'd with a parade at 1 o'clock Saturday afternoon and then topped off with a big street dance that evening. Take Life Knsy Meanwhile, the fliers themselves are just taking life easy, recuper- ating from their near seven weeks long stay in thu cramped quarters of the small converted Aeronea plane. Both appear to be as well as before they took off on the Jaycee sponsored hop. Both lost weight although no ill effects seem -o have resulted. Since their lami- ng Jongewanl and Woodhouse luivc spent quite a bit of time with .heir feet under a dinner table, making up for lost time on the 'oods prohibited by their diet. Letters and telegrams are still coming every day from various of the country. One message received Wednesday and address- ed to Horace Griffon, read: "Dear Horace; "It is with considerable satisfac- lion that 1 have followed the, news concerning the great performance of Woody Jongeward and Bo) Wnodhousc and their' crew uf as sistants, and I believe that some thing-of a practical-nature ahoulf zona, Southern California unit Southern Nevada in recent weeks. Ambassador Crocker will retrace the routes of Jefferson Caffrry, ambassador to Kgypt, here Jate in July and early August, and'J. Hives Childa, ambassador to Saudi Arabia, who made the mid-ScptemlH'r. gation distribution system Friday and Saturday and will confer with officials of the Salt Kiver Valley Water Users' Association. His party will drive to Yuma Sunday for an inspection on Mon- duy of the Yumu. Gila, and All- trip American Projects and meetings I with water users officials. E. F. Sanguinetti Heads Group To Study Uses for Huachuca Responding to invitations made by repre.wntatives Arizona organ- izations mid individuals, including Kay G. l.angham, speaker of the louse of Keprcsentatives, direc- nrs of Greater Inc., have ppolnted a committee to study losslhllltles of further utilization if facilities at Fort Huachuca. Chairman of the committee is 3, F. "Yuma county irector of the statewide Ixiostei group. Other members of thf :ommittee arc John Pintek. His lee, member of the Ren- ite from Cochise county, and iam R, Chamberlain, executive nanager. According to Sanguinetti, "Fai wider uses of the facilities at t'ort -iuachuca than are currently con .omplated are ultimately possi- jlc." At Greater Arizona's recent- ly concluded Cochise county cllnii Ralph P. Merrill, formerly fick director of WAA, cited the fol lowing possible uses for the Him property: 1. An extensive medical re OSLO, Norway. Oct. 13 '.U.R1-- iOrd Boyd Orr. Scottish food ex >crt and former director of tin Jnitecl Nations Food and Agricul .ural was awardp< the 1949 Nobel Peace prize las night. The announcement of the avvart was made by the Nobi-1 Commit Lee of tile Norwegian Parliamcnl Details were not made availabl immediately. The prize will be given to Boy On- at a ceremony in Oslo Dec 10. anniversary of the death Alfred Nobel, donor of the nwar Boyd Orr devoted his life t the stiulv of nutrition and its e feet on the economy of the worli Throughout Ills life he iirophcsic world famines and collapse civilization. Ho served in the British Jlinis- ry of Health and Agriculture iiiring the Second World War. In board of directors o county chamber of the coni- The Yuma inerco will hold its regular semi- monthly meeting at the Vallej cafe at noon tomorrow (Friday) President K. C. Bradcn has an nounccd. 'All directors tire urgi-i to attend. CTMITY 946 he. wns fiopointed director scneral of the Food and Aericul- ural Organization of the UN. He worked for a World Food Board, but his plan wys rejected the United States. In January. concaK Ward French. Community Concert president, was a Yuma visitor during Silver Spur Ho- dco season last year, nnil was locked up in the on Main street for failure to dress Western. He came to Yuma for a personal look at the city which has consistently support- ed good music for its citizens for ton years, through Com- munity Yuma Elks Honor Newspapermen Yuma Elks lodge last nigh honored the newspapermen nmon the membership, in cooperatio: with a nationwide observance i) the fraternal order of Nationa Newspaper Week, Oct. 1-8. Five members praised Exal ed Ruled K. V. Crowder for sc- vice to the community and to 111 Elks lodge through local news- papers, were: Joseph B. Gonna former publisher of the Somerto Star; Lee Zavonil, present Sta publisher; nnd H. P.. Wcston. Siciliano and Jones Osborn of tl Yuma Daily Sun. Mr. Osboi spoke briefly on the meaning ;n importance to all Americans of press, describing the. public's' to be well informed n? the free right true meaning of freedom of th press. B. C. Lawler. past exalted nil- .017. a modified plan b.isc'l on li'is I cr. read the eulogy for K. I. Whin. World Food Board Finn was past cxalled ruler of the Yuma niblic in Washington, with the 'lodge who died last week. endorsement of 16 of the nations meeting on the Preparatory Com- be addeX} to the praise and admir ation they so richly earned Doubtless many others will fee the same way and so here is m. check to be added to a fund t impensate them in part, for th itlay of courage, skill and irnnce, that made the accom- ishment possible. 'With this younger generation such men as .Tongcward and 'oodhouse and those others who elpcd promote and contribute to lis achievement, in the harness, future of Yuma is in good amis. Sincerely, Ray farmer San Diego, Calif." Sends Mr. Former, a grower and dis- ribntor of Arizona pecans, cn- losed a check for payable o Woody Jongeward and Bob Voodhouse. A telegram signed by A. C. Stewart, vice' president of the larkeling Union Oil Company of California, read: "Sorry I cannot be a part of the velconiing- committee today. Con- gratulations fin an outstanding achievement" This was received Monday after .he fliers ship down it tlie Yuma County Airport. Sev- eral officials of tlie Union Oil lompany were present to greet the fliers, and are expected to return Saturday for the celebration.. The piano will be placed on top of the Buiek refueling car and set nt the intersection of Main and Second streets for inspection throughout the festivities. Service clubs and other local or- ganizations arc meetings this week to make plans for par- ticipation in UK- celebration and especially in the parade. One of the latest was the Yuma Elks Quadrille which met Wednesday night. Halt Excavation at Site Where "Yuma Man" Lived Years Ago Nationalists Flee Canton For Chungking laboratory. 2. A private educational insli- itlnn. 3. II. S. government iTscarch istitution. A cooperative village of re-italcd workers. A site for .small dccentraliz- d industrial operations. Speaking for- the newly formed iimimittee, William B. Chnnjber- ain, Greater Arizona manager, itnted that in Its investigations t would employ the same public icarlngs technique which the or- ganization's aviation committee employed in studying "eeder line air transportation in Date of the first hear- ing was not a.nnounced today, but ,t is expected that the initial Hearing on J.he 1-Iimeliuca problem, to be held in Phoenix, will be late In October. Offers Plan to Make If Work Sums Up Navy Case Against Setup WASHINGTON. O i-1. j- AU.ni., Louis E. [jrnfeld, chief I of naval operations, told Con- gress today the way unification is lulininislrrril now is "worse than no unification" at all. Di'iifcld summed up for the House Armed Services commit- tee the Navy's ease against the present national defense setup. He proposed a six-point program which hi; said would "make uni- fication work." The chief of naval operations is one of four members of Urn Joint Chiefs of Staff, the organi- zation which frames "unified" plans for waging, war. The other three members are generals. Denfcld's fleet commanders have been telling the House Armed Ser- vices committee, that he is "die- to." "outvoted" a n il not CANTON, China, Oct. 13 (U.R) Acting President Li Tsung-.len ami the last remnants of-the National- ist Government abandoned Can- ton today to advancing Commun- ist armies striking at the city from three sides. Final defense of Canton, if there Is to be one, was placed in the hands of Gen. Yu Han-Mou, mem- ber of the old Kwangtung military clique who surrendered the Lo the Japanese in 1938. city Olds] Rejection Seen As Major Truman Defeat WASHINGTON, Ocl. President Truman suffered a jor political defeat today whei the Senate rejected his nonilni lion of Leland Olds to a thin term on the federal Power Com mission. It marked the third time thi; session that a Truman appointo  clear days and five "partly cloudy" days. The Yuma mesa citrus station recorded 10.1 inches of evapora- tion during the month. sv Ocl. Hilny nii-nt sri7.it re Ilir mines m ohn L. mW that jtovrrn- and t ion nf ichl the only out of the tho roitl (Mint raH mxol Inl Hr nc- rn-MMl the steel ami nml imhlv Iries uitii teaming up t c-.-.l The Washington attorney said that the disadvantages of the bill were that it permitted leases of Indian land allowed the Indians' property to be attached .mdcr state court judgments. Sam Akrah, Tribal Council chairman, urged the Nnvajos to vote for a veto of the bill. 'Why should the government put us under state laws when we are not educated enough'.'" Okeah said. Councilman Howard Gorman also supported tht veto proposal, saying: "It looks to me like the gov- ernment is putting on a show, in- viting the states of Arizona and Xcw Mexico, and then we put on a strip tease so the states can ly now that Russia has mastered .he atom.' 2. Gen. Carl A. Spaatz. form- er Air Force chief of staff, said his regular Newsweek Magfl- ine column that Capt. John -C. Crommelin should be promptly ourt martinled "to preserve dis- ipiine in Crommc- is the v e't e r a n Navy flier vhose voluble protests against resent unification policies iromptcd the House inquijy. 4-Hlers7oHold Judging Contest Next Saturday A judging contest to dctermins the teams to represent Yuma county at the State. Fair Novem- ber 12 will be held this Saturday. Bub McCrcight. assistant county agent in charge, of club work, announced this morning.. The event is scheduled to get underway nt a. m. at school. l-H'ers are to meet at the stock sheds at the school where they will judge poultry, rabbits and vegetables. From then) the group will visit various farms around the valley where the trams I will ju'Jec dairy and other i stock. The contest should be fin- ished by 2 or o'clock that after- noon. McCreight said. Judges will need to compete in all phases of the judging as thus; with the highest segregate scores will bo chosen for the Phoenix trip. The disappearance of Niccoli and Ogul also increased the fi- nancial worries of the little mob- ster, who complained recently thatj------------------------------- he was "practically broke." n kj Uiir4 Cohen has put up S50.000 bond D. 11, nUlT fnr JCiccoli and S25.000 for Ogul in an assault case involving the chief and seven of his hench- men. If they do not show up for trial Cohen stands to lose the money. IN JUSTICE COURT John .1. Cn.-ares was fined J100 on a reckless driving count he appeared before .Justice of the Peace R. H. Lutes this week. Also. M. S. Delcid paid a 5HO fine on K like charge ami fine for driving without an op- In Farm Accident Hrarly Collins. Yuma counfy pspppsnr, is reported to be im- proving today after suffering ankle fracture last Sunday morn- ing. The long time Yiiman was hclr- ing with the work on the at" his home when the accident occurred. A Icvcler which he WM riding overturned on shsrT turn, fracturing his left unkl The injured member will prob- ably be in a cast for about three weeks.   

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