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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: May 23, 1947 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - May 23, 1947, Yuma, Arizona                             IHC. At TDMA Beportoi munum Highest last 21 hours..................91 Lowest last 2-1 Iwiirs....................07 Average high this date................01 Average low this date............62 rtclutlvc Humidity 11 a.m.....33% AND TH TINEL WEATHER FORECAST TO SATUKDAY NICiHT Mostlly clear with continuing light to moderate southerly wind: temperature about Uiu same. VOLUME 122 Yuma, May VOLUME 122 ELECTION BOARDS FOR CITY LISTED Five Precincts Described; Special Election June 3 Five polling places have been sot up in tho city for thn special election .slated for June Ilrd, it was learned today. The election posts will fje man- ned by a full complement of judg- es and clerks already named, it was announced. Polling sites, the arena they control, and the various staffs follow: Number one is at the Hotel Del Sol and takes in thnt area east of. the Southern Pacific Old Main line railroad. Inspector. Earl C. Hull; judges, Anna C. Molloy, Theresa Lorona; marshal, T. S. Brunette; clerks, Emma O'Brien, Gertrude Downey. Number two. City hall, includ- ing north from center line at Second street to north city lim- its and west from the Southern Old -Main line to the, west city limits. Inspector, Beatrice, Grecnlenf; judges, Dorothy Stei- erl. .Josephnne C. Balsx; clerks. Sadie BrisLow.. Ethel Slandsberry; marshal, G. T. Adams. Number three, Iieepcr -Motor company, south center; line at Second street to the center line ut Eighth street and west from the Southern Pacific Old Main line to the center of Third ave- nue and Orange avenue. Inspec- tor, Li l lie M. Cheney; judges, Minnie Kurt, Lois Bceier; clerks, May Roberts, Elccta M. Wells; marshal. Ed Hultgren. Number four, former American Legion hall, south from center line at Second street's center line to Eighth street and then .west to the center line at Orange avenue finO 'Ji'jir'.'i Third avenue and then to tho west city limits. Inspector, Rose Cohnan; judges. lone S. Wil- son, Hazel L. Caudry; clerks, Margaret B. Graham, Margaret Blalack; marshal, J. C. .Fetzcr. Number five, New Fire station Sixth avenue and llth street south center line to Eighth street from- the -cast city -limits to' thn west city limits. Inspector, Vifgle B. Dulancy; judges, Betty Collins, -Toy Welter; clerks, NiljL. Miller, Zola B. SchwarU; marshal, H. L Washum. The absentee ballot board: In- spector, Clara Hiley; judges, Lil- lian Wolfe, W. B. McCaw; Clerks Harriet B. Ming, Wi, S. Jones, liertha Wright. Citizens eligible to vote will bo asked to vote or "no" on two amendments to the city char- ter which set's up a new metho.t of paying warrants on thc-'city, Alert for Protest Tcleiiliulol Caspar Dut-ft, of Bnull, -ordered; police oquads to occupy National nnd Regional headquarters of outlawed Brazil- Ian' Communist Party .at. Rio de protest demon- strations against ban decreed by Supreme Electoral Tribunal. At tame time. President Dutra sus- peilded Brazilian Federation of La- bor nnd 21 regional labor organiza- tions alleged to be under Com- munist influence. AG. DEPT. BUDGET CUT 32 PERCENT House Committee Slashes 381 Millions WASHINGTON. May The Mouse Appropriations com- mittee mainspring oT the Repub- lican economy drive, today vot- ed n reduction of nr 32 per the Agricul- ture department's operating funds for the new fiscal year. The action was taken in the face of a warning by Secretary of Agriculture Clinton P. Anderson that it would cripple the farm program. It would leave the de? partment about for the 12 months period beginning July 1. This'Would be 32 per cent less thnn President Truman's budget request and some less than tho department, had a vail- a bin this fiscal year. Lindsey to Become Program Manager of New Yuma Radio Station KYSC; Will Be Married June 14 ncwlyweds, BUI Llmksey and Francie Waite. who plan to he married at Trinity (Episcopal) Cathedral in Phoenix on June M. will join the stuff of the Sun Country Network on .Inly 1. After their honeymoon in Cali- fornia at Qirmel-ny-the-Sea the Umlsoys will return to Phoenix for a course of training at KPSC and KPSC-LiM under Sun Coun- try executives. Following this, the couple will be assigned to their permanent posts at Yuma, Mr. IJndscy's hometown- and the residence of his parents. Mr. Undsey will be program managerr of KYSC, Sun Country outlet at Yuma. and Mrs. Lind.wy will be office manager. Mr. Lindsey, formerly with 1CU.MA ami. KYUM at Yuma. was in the U. S. Army for four years during World War II, serving both in the Infantry and the Air Corps, from which he was dis- charged with the rank of cap- tain. The future Mrs. Lindsey former- ly was with the K.WPC anil In- ternational Recording Artists Stu- dios, both of Hollywood. Supt. McGraw Replies to Parent Group's Recommendations for Improvements in City Schools Kiwanians Hear Gross Talk On Playground Plan The Poor' Man's Andrews Hisicrs onlcrlainccl Kiwaninns yesterday at their weekly luncheon meeting at Clymcr's. C. 0. Cilliam, program chair- man, furnished the entertainment from radio KYUM. George Gross described the Knights of Columbus program to establish and equip a non-denom- inational playground on five acres of land donated by the E. V. Snng- llineUi estate. In five weeks, lie reported. K.C.'s have earned ?1-IOO through weekly barn dunces and n benefit boxing show. Response uf the public has been excellent, Mr. Gross said. He emphasized that tho K.C. program was not in competition with any recreational program the city might institute, hut stated that the facilities which they were planning would be at the disposal of a city-wide pro- gram. Guests present included Harold Hobcrls, guest of Bob Painter; J. F. McKalc. director of athletics at TJnivT'.'it.y of Arizona, a guest nf Hurold Thomas; and Tony Leon, guest of Charles Lopez. Mrs. B. Z. Sharp, Former Valley Resident, Dies Sirs. Mulicl Sharp, wife of n. K. Sharp, pioneer' Yuma Valley farmer, died at her home in TCI Monte, Calif, according to word received by local friends lost night. Funeral services will be held at El Monte Monday at 'i p.m., with the Rev. McKce, pastor of the Kl Monte Nazarene church, officiating. Burial will take place in the El Monte cemetery. Tile Sharps, who moved lo the valley about 1017, moved to El Monte several years ago. Surviving are the husband, e.ig'nt children, Including -Mrs. Jones of Somcrton, and a broth- er, Aubrey Parks, former Somcr- ton resident. Clark is Pleased With Conviction Of Marzani WASHINGTON, May The conviction of Carl Aldo Mar- 7.uni..'was hailed by the Jiistlr-c dcpartmenb.today as the first vic- tory iri its-campaign to prosecute alleged Communists in the XJnit- Attorney General Tom C.. Clark said he was "very much pleased" with-the verdict. Marzani. ousted State department was found Federal court' late "yes- terday of 'concealing' his Com- iriuriist to- retain--his r government job. "When the Justice1 department sufficient to prose- cute; subyerslvcs as said Clark, 'Mt: wall" do'so as ex- peditipusly; and as vigorously as was'done im this, matter." A. Justice department, spokes- man .the Mai'zani oasn as the first one in which a fed- eral.-employe-ever was tried und convicted.'-.'of lying" about Com- munist' government prosecu- tions of alle'gcd Conimunists how arc' pending. Contempt of Con- gross 'indictments have: been rc- tufhed'.jicro against Eugene Dcn- niS; -secretary of the Communist party; in'vthc, U. S.! and against German-born Gerhart Eisler, al- leged -beh'iml-thersccnes boss of Ajiiericdn reds. Eisler is scheduled to, go on trial Tuesday for failing 'to .give" "information to the House Uriameric'an Activities commit- an Italian-born New .Yorker, faces a maximum sen- tence df 30 years, in .prison and a 'fine on each of 11 counts p'osslblc total 110 years nnd No date "has been set for Sentencing. C. W. McGraw, superintendent of Yuma city schools, today re- plied to the Yuma Parents Com- mittec, which early this week had The ccMiiinlttiM! said Us J made public a long letter of "rec- ommendations, gleaned from the myriad of complaints, that we feel would effectuate a correction of existing ills." Supt. McGraw, in his four-page letter, said that all of the proo- by grunts and subsl- j ]-c'ms mentioned had been known cisi.in was to (lie basic philosophy that nvjru of agri- culture's problems must solved by individual wntl com- munity net ion nil her than through fiNJeraJ pitternaUsm no- Negro As Burgh Arrested arin Lawyer's Office A Negro was arrested early this morning for breaking and enter- ing after "a garbage truck crew had noticed a light in a lawyer's office and had notified the police. It was at this morning when the truck rolled by Peter C. Byrne's office at 1.12 First ave- nue and noticed a light twinkling on and off. They called the police who sped a prowl car silently to the .scene, The police got out of the car, I and the two investigating officers, Howard Mabery and Jesse N. Britlcy phoned Byrne at his home. Byrne got on his clothes and came downtown immediately while the police watched the office. The patrolman opened the door and found John Tarifrro crouch- ing' in a corner under the desk. The door had been jimmied open and desk drawers and files were opened and ransacked. On tin- man, who was booked for breaking and entering, was found a complement of burglary imple- ments sucli as a crowbar, hack- saws, screw drivers, oil, and jim- tlies, While Anderson said the depart-, nient's budget had been pared to; the bone, the committee .charged that the agency still was guilty of duplication and overstaffing. At several points in its report it urged a congressional study with a view to consolidating re- lated departmental 'activities. Romney Sentenced To 1 to3 Years In U. WASHINGTON, May ---Kenneth Romney, fornicr House, _ scrgeanl-at-arms. today was sen- Yuma City Schools. All of these and under discussion for: some a shortage of space and qualified teachers had post- poned solving most of them. The letter from the Yuma.Par- ents committee had been signed by Joh'n. B. Bailey, F. C.-Braden, Felix Mllstead, Frank Hobart, C. G. Ekstrom and John H. Fair- weather. Supt. McGraw's letter, in its entirety, follows: Mr. C. Bradcn Yuma, Arizona Dear Mr. Bradcn, in reply to your letter dated May 19th, I am addressing .this letter to you since ..'.you', .were spokesman for the minority group both the Superintendent and the teacher. This is truly the idea! parent-teacher fclationship. We quite agree with you that an increased curricula is in order. In the past we have had domestic science and manual training in our .school, but they were discontinued when It became necessary to uti- lize the space for cla'ssrooms. It has been uppermost in our minds to offer these courses again when the space -and qualified teachers are available. In regard to cooperation with the secondary school, we believe you mean the curricula both schools should be co-ordinated. We recognize -this existing problem and as yet there is'no solution either here or elsewhere in the United States. The difference between the scondary schools anc the elementary schools is a prob- lem the leading educators of the world have been unable to solve. The solution that has been offer- ed any school in Arizona is the Course of Study given to us by the State Department of Education. It is used by us as'the basis of our MAY BLAMES POLITICS FOR ACCUSATION Charges Probe Was Launched For Political Purpose WASHINGTON, MAY Former Congressman Andrew J. May sought today to show at his war fraud trial that ex-Senator James M. Mearl. D., is'. Y., car- ried out for political purposes an investigation which led to May's indictment. But the court struck the subject from the record. May and the Garsson brothers, Henry M. and Murray, are charg- ed with conspiracy to defraud tile .jovernment. They arc on trial in Federal court. May is charged witli accepting more than in bribes from the Garssons. Mead was chairman of the Sen- ate War Investigating committee which turned up first charge: against the Garssons and May Mead later ran for governor of New York. Charles J. Margiotti, counsel fo! the Garssons, first instructed Ma> at this morning's session not to answer a question he was aboii' to put to him until the court had ruled on it. Then he asked: 4'Was Senator Mead at the time of the investiga- tion a candidate for .governor ol New York "Yes." May shouted withoul waiting. Prosecutor Objects Chief Prosecutor William A Paisley objected. Federal Judge Henrv Schweinhaut first le of parents which met with us in-curricula. The secondary school December. and our school have always co- Your letter made reference to several problems confronting the tenced to from one to three years j have be in prison- for concealing j an' shortage in funds in the House "Bank" for almost 20 years. Romney. 63-year-old Montanan, was convicted by a federal court jury on May 13. He was indicted last February, not long after he lost his post as House scrgeanl- of-arms when the republicans won the November election. 545 STUDENTS TO GRADUATE FROM U. A. MAY 28 TUCSON, Ariz., May 2il (U.R1-- 515 students will be graduated- by- the University of. Arizona May 23, it was -announced today. Dr. T. V. Smith, at present a visiting professor... at. the Uni- versity of California, at Los An- geles, will be the principal speak- er. Dr. Smith is regularly a pro- fessor of philosophy at the Uni- versity of Chicago. The president will hold his an- nual reception on the library lawn May 2T. On May 28 an Hon- ors Assembly will be held in the auditorium and baccalaureate and graduation exercises in the sta- dium. BULLETIN! TAK1S, May 1'rein- irr 1'aul Iviimadlcr charged in the Assembly today that leftist and rightist underground move- ments IVITC trying to exploit social unrest so us to undermine the republic. have been known to us for. d.means and.methods have been discussed to remedy them. most of these problems cannot .be solved until space and qualified teachers arc available. Many, of the points brought out in your letter are vague and in- definite and for that reason it is difficult to give a concrete answer. We do however, offer the follow- ing- information: Parents are always welcome to visit our schools. If you will-read on the back of our report cards, you will find this'sentence: "The frequent .visits of parents-'to the school cannot fail -to .produce re- Many parents .have-visit- ed "our schools and have.discussed their -.problems1' and difficulties It is our desire to.keep abreast j of the investigation when Hen (Continued on Page 2) 11 Pet. Boost in Arizona Railroad Fares Approved PHOENIX, May The State Corporation commission yesterday approved an 11 per cent increase in Arizona, railroad pas- senger fares except for coach tick- ets. Huge Trucks to Get Tryouts Here Huge, -six-wheel drive trucks designed by the Kenworth Motor Truck corporation of Seatllc for hauling pipeline in the Arabian desert are slated this week Tor a desert try out here, it was learned today. i The trucks were built to operate under grueling desert conditions for Aranian-Amcrican Oil com- pany. In the local tests, a pilot model will work under condilions ap- proximately those in Saudi Ara- bia, where the trucks will be used to pull trailers loaded with heavy oil drilling equipment and' pipe for the mile running from the upper Persian gulf to the eastern Mediterranean area. the question and answer stand but after a bench conference ord ered them stricken from the rec ord. May also testified he had in knowledge of the Mead eommittC' investigation of the Garsson mu nitions empire until about th first of June, 1946. Government testified May witnesses earlie: knew of the in perated with each other, and our vestigation in the summer policy has ahvays been one of 1945. mutual understanding. May said that he first Icarnci The Santa Fe and Southern Pa- cific railroad told the .commission the request'was to make intrastate fares conform to interstate fares. The increase will become "effective only if the Interstate -Commerce c o m mis o n approves higher through passenger tariffs; June 1 is the effective date un- less the federal agency gives an adverse ruling. Child Reported Bitten By Dog Little Patsy Jean got bitten by a dog yesterdav at noon, her fa- ther T. W. Ward. 105 North Fifth avenue, complained to the police. The bite drew blood, it was said, and the police went to question Mrs. Jack Reed. 172 North Sixth avenue, owner of the biting dog1. Mrs. Reed told the officers that the little girl had been in her backyard and had been bitten in her backyard. The dog's owner said the dog had a license and had been inoculated against rabies, and warned children to stay out of her dog's bailiwick. ry Garsson called on him in carl; June, 1946 and asked him if hi committee was investigating th Garsson firms. May said the com mittce was not. He suggested might be the Mead committee. The government charges tha May was paid more than for using his influence as chair man of the House Military Af fairs committee to further th Garssons1 interests. Leads Toastmasters JURY FAILS TO AGREE IN HARP CASE Dismissed After Six Hours of Deliberation Curtis Krent, Sr., Yuma Toast- inasttrr, was unanimously elected Saturday a I the tion's district meet in I'lioenix as district govmwr for the coming year. 31 r. Kt-ene has .served as president of the local club mid VV-H.S deputy district governor the year. Yuma Man Named Toastmaster Head, Arizona District Curtis Keene, Sr., Yuma busi- nessman was named district gov- ernor of the Toast masters club Saturday at the group's annual meeting in Phoenix-. The district is comprised of the entire state The choice was un- of Arizona. animous. Attending the Toastmasters' meeting from Yuma besides Mr. and Mrs. Keene were Mr. and Mrs. Lee V. Zavoral, Mr. and Mrs. William Sands and Mr. and Mrs. Al Morgan. Participating in the district speech uuntcst as Yuma's repre- sentative was William Sands whose subject was "The Cost of Steel, America's Problem. 50 Housing Units At Airbase To Be Vacated June 1 Fifty housing units located on the Yuma army air base have been ordered vacated by June 1, it was learned today. The units have been in the pos- session of the Engineer Test Branch for some time, but the engineer office has requested that they be declared surplus, inasmuch as authorization has been received to build 3S permanent type hous- ing units at the test branch. None of the 50 units to be vacated have kitchens, having been used by civilian personnel during the war when cafeteria service was avail- able at the air base. Through a typographical error in yesterday's Daily Sun. the deadline for vacating the 50 units 1 was not given in the story. Salome Man Named To Mineral Board PHOENIX, May Sidney P. Osbnrti today appoint- on B. Mills. Salomo, to the State Board of Mineral Resources to fill the term of UH! late ,1. K. Laytou, Chloride, which expires Jan. :u, 1IM8. The governor also reappointcd Wcldon C. Humphrey, Nogalcs, to tho Board for a tcr.ii ending Jan. 31, 1052. Yuma Union High School Students Receive Prized Awards at Assembly; Three Faculty-Members are Honored Yuma Union high school stu- presented a deer rifle by atu- ican Legion Auxiliary award for a regional award in the same di- ilents yesterday received coveted year-end awnrds for excellence in nil fields of endeavor in their annual Awards Assembly, and in turn honored three faculty mem- bers, one of whom will not re- turn to teach here next year. Prized All School awards, for outstanding students in scholar- ship nnd extra, curricular activ- ilies, went 'to Dorothy Joyner, Loin Kovattcr nnd John Garrett. Awards were, presented by Prin- cipal L. T. Rouse. Vice Principal L. C. Dingess, basketball coach Bill Mano.s and vocational agriculture instructor Elmer Fulton were honored by the students who surprised them with gifts presented during the assembly. Mr. Felton, who will not return to teach here next year, wns honored by Future Far- mers of America, the cliib he ad- vises; Bill Mnncs by the senior class, which he has served as ad- viser during the past year, his flrat, here; und L. C. Dingeya was dents at large. Ln.sls Full Hour The assembly lasted a full hour yesterday afternoon as Mr. Rouse handed out athletic letters, an- nounced contest winners and pre- sented certificates of outstanding work to scores of students. Among the awards was a cash presented to Gene Smith of the North Gila valley by the E. F. Sanguinctti company for the outstanding agricultural student during the year. Veterans' auxiliary organiza- tions gave a number of awards for citizenship and historical ac- complishments. The Daughters of tho American Revolution his- tory award for 19-1-6 went to Ruth Johnson, and for 1047 to Patsy A kins. The D. A. U. dllzciiHhip award, presented by the D.A.U, regent went to Theresc Morrow Miss Morrow also was presented the Render's Digesl .award for high school valedictorians. making the highest grade in the I Federal constitution test, and al- so won the Baiisehc and Lomb Scie award. Tom Wngaman. Margaret Vas- quf% and Sharon Hnguo won first, second and third respective- ly, in the Legion Auxiliary's us- say contest. Win Kssa.v Awards Veterans of Foreign Wars Aux- iliary essay awards went to Betty Hohrer. Leslie Altstalt and Mike Kalsmnn in that order. Their es- says on "Home, the. Cradle of Good Citizenship." have been' en- the state contest. Leslie Altstntt also won tered in tin; Woodmen of the. World Amer- ican list Lory award. Shirley High tower was present- ed the Delta Kappa Gamma teacher training award of Art Awards Tho national 'art award, a cer- tificate of merit, went to Taadorc Cordciro for his linoleum block John Underbill won the AJTicr-l print; he received a gold Ucy as Yuma Youth Held AMI-Centre "On Burglary Count A Yuma youth, studious and well-comported, was being held by El Centro juvenile authorities for a burglary, it was disclosed today. The boy had- been living with family friends in Brawley, when an.urge he couldn't explain, im- pelled him to burglarize a service station of S-12__in cash and a .22 calibre gun. V sophomore at the Brawley Union High school, the lad is and is said to have been "a model both in his studies and demeanor. He was nabbed when he wen I to see a Brawley doctor for a bul- let wound in his left Unee suffer- ed when the gun he stole went oft. The physician is required by lav. to notify police of all gunshot wounds treated, and after ques- tioning" the boy, he. was taken to the juvenile detention home in E Centro where he is being1 held awaiting trial. Pie is also said to have stolen i pun, cartridge belt and handcuffs from Walter Walsh, a California highway patrolman, who had each ed the items under a blanket ii his car when he attended a Scout camporal here a few week.1- ago. The boy had thrown the hand cuffs and" the belt on the highwu} and had hidden the gun under a Brawlev church. After sonic six hourx delibera- tion :i jury that included four wwnt-n was nnahic to come U> a deU'imination in the- cast; of Ralph Harp. .'M, accused of molesting little girls at a motion picture house. The jurv returned with its "hung" verdict at a.m., with Mrs. Chlnca M. Cannon, oman in the history of the coun- to he selected us foreman, Judge Henry C. Kelly that hey were unable to arrive at a Judge dismissed the jury, nd it was learned from several ouices that Harp most likely not be put on trial again aggravated assault that took ic form, according to police wit- esses and an i l-year-old girl, lat he had made unnatural ges- urea towards her one Saturday "ternoon last month. Defendant Denies While the defendant lonk tho .and and denied repeatedly un- cr cross-examination that hu ad laid a hand on the little girl's nee or otherwise molested her, was said to have weighed cavity with the jury was a pa- ade of character witnesses on his ehalf from Imperial dam that Harp was a person of good jiidg- lent and sound moral character. Yesterday, in summing up for ic state, County Attorney H. H. laker had labeled the defendant "sex pervert" and had charged hat his services with the army n the Aleutian Islam's as.a civil- an employe had brought him in- o contact with unsavoury prae- ices common at army camps. Baker emphasized that thu "omanhood of the state must bo protected" by making" the ot'- pnsc a felony rather than a. inis- learncnor as is the practice in >lher states. Leveling a finger at Harp who ;at quietly at the council table, .ho county attorney urged the ury'to convfc-t the man as a les- ion "to those who try to corrupt girls und lead them on the lain of bad." Harp's lawyer, Bryant Jones, old the jury that there had been liscrepancies in the evidence and isked them not to be swept by imotionalisms. To Jury at 4 p.m. The jury was given the case at p.m., and was taken out to linner at under the wing oC V. P. Teichman, court bailiff. At p.m.. they informed ,hc bailiff that they couldn't ar- at a verdict and asked that be opened. The defendant, his attorney, the county attorney nd the jury filed in and Mrs. Cannon told tin; court the jury vas unable to come to a unant- nniis decision. It was learned reliably that thn :ote after many ballots stood at seven to five. vision. A first place award for clay sculpture was given to Flor- cnc Beck; for linoleum block print, to Melba 'M inter. A sec- ond place regional award for still life drawing was piVscntcd to Joanne Dorchcrs. Drainnlists Recognized Recognition for high school dramatists was made by present- ation of National Thespian cer- tificates to 15 qualifying stu- dents: Leslie Mildred Alvarado, Lynn Heeler, Malcolm Ellis, Leo Brancfield, Kenneth Clark, Leslie Gallaher, Travis Cowan, Shirley Hightower, Jen- nie Hodges, Mike Kalsmnn. Paul- ine Lipscomh, Clyde Shields, Mnr- garut Smith and P.ob Tench. Ilontriimkers Advanced Twenty-two members of Fu- trji'ft Homemakers of America were advanced to the Junior Homcmnkcr degree. They arc: Pauline Burnett, Evelyn Cunklin, Olgu Connor, Dorothy Erwin, (Continued on Page 8) Presbyterian Group Sacks Stand On Gambling A joint meeting Wednesday cning between the board of trus tees and the .session of tho I'rcs byterian church resulted in a res olution endorsing the stand nf th Yuma County Ministerial assoeia lion's stand on gambling1, it wa: announced. Recently, the association said i would co-operate with county nn> city officials in eliminating gamb ling in this area, and the Presby terian church officials official! went on record as approving, i was said. Cantaloupe Markets Dull, Unsettled Thursday's wholesale cantnlnup jobbing markets through tho nil Uun were dull and unsettled i New York, about steady in Phi iulclphia, and dull In Seattle, Cecile nirslcy of Mitrkut .service announced. The: quality nnd the conditi nf the fruit was good, the expei declared. Carrot shipments disclosed dull und weak New York miirkr and a weak ChicaK" and Philadc phia market, the service reportei Watermelons at the ficutt market were steady, Miss Pursk asserted. CASCADINGS TWELVE carloads of canta- loupe moved yesterday out of the city on the Southern Pacific, it was announced today. The carloads, roughly, arc worth about it was said. Other carloads were: '2 ornnges. 10 hay. 1 flaxsecd. 1 processed .sand. 1 bottles. 1 merchandise. Boy Falls Asleep In Theatre, Wakes At 5 This Morning Young Uichard Lash, not unly saw the feature hut took a long weekend to dreani it over. Last night. Dick went into the Yumu theater at o'clock and. settled himself for a good two hours away from school books, teachers ami such nonsense. The picture was good, and thM second time around was even bet- ter. But when the hero gathered the blonde into his arms I'or the final clinch, that was too rnudi for Dickie-boy. Shooting is film, riding hell for leather over lillln )ind into canyons are fine too. Hut this love-making, ptchah! saitl Dickie. So he settled himstlt' anil snoozed. Along about a.m. morning, Dic-kie awakened, l.hr: screen was dead pan, the lights were out, the all-talking was sil- ent. It might have been December for all ho knew. Cut cleverly enough, Dickie, after trying all tho moans of exit, used the telephone and told the operator about his long sleep. She phoned the police who bun- dled Dickie into their ear and in the pale dawn, they rode over hill and dale and through gulches t'i his home at 353 Maiden lane whore he settled himself for he. full eight hpurs.   

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