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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: December 3, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - December 3, 1946, Yuma, Arizona                             THE ARIZONA SENTlNEL VOLUME L'SP, Tuesday. December 3, TUB WKAT1IEK AT YL'MA A.s ItfporifMl S. Wfallier llureiiu Highest last it hours..................SO Lowest last 2-1 hours..................51 Average high this date................71 Average low this date................15 Relative Humidity at 11 a.m...SO'.; WEATHER FORECAST TO -V1GHT Mostly, clear with little tli.ir.go in temperature. VOLUME 283 LEWIS AND U.M.W. ARE FOUND GUILTY GFMFftAI County Zoning Bills DAWFD PATF Coal Strike Sootliahts 'Inch' Lines 'nffJrfnle RAIII. DftCTDAklEft GENERAL STRIKE AT OAKLAN0 A.F.L Calls Out Strike-Breakers OAKLAND. Calif., Dec. American Federation of La- bor struck this city's industries ami businesses at o a.m. today in a move thai threatened virtually to isolate residents along the eastern shore of the San Fran eisco Bay. Early risers found themselves without morning1 newspapers or public transportation. But the full irnpaet of the strike would not be felt until later in tin; day when stores, offices and factories open- ed. The immediate effect of the strike halted Key System buses, trains and streetcars serving Oak- land, Berkeley and Alameda and San Francisco commuters. The transit system ceased all opera- tions lo minutes before the .strike officially became effective. Called in I'rolcst Tin; strike was called ti police protection given "imported strikebreakers" unloading mer- chandise at two picketed depart- ment stores last, Sunday. Tt was expected to involve the city's two afternoon newspapers, restaurants, retail stores, ship- yards and factories, construction work, trucking and delivery ser- vice. Only "essential services." such as pharmacists, retail milk drivel's, hospital help ami sanita tion employes, were spared. City officials took immediate steps to meet the emergency. May- or Herbert L. Beach said the city government "will see to it that the lives and property of its ci- tizenry are protected and peace, preserved." 1'olicc Acting City Manager Ralph York said a disaster emergency plan may be put into effect. The entire city police department County Zoning Bills I To Be Introduced in Legislature PiioE.vix, Dec. Bills authorizing county zoning and planning ami modernizing the state highway and sanitary codes will bu presented to the 1947 Legisla- ture in January by the Arizona statewide planning ami legislative committee. Drafts of the proposed bills were unanimously approved at a meet- ing of the commitiee here late yesterday. 'Previous attempts to push measures through the Legis- lature have failed. "Farmers have felt county plan- ning find zoning would be inimical in their Fred A. Iron- ride, Jr., committee chairman, said. "That feeling1 has been disipated and tile Farm Bureau Federation has given the proposal its sup- I port." Tucson Printers Strike Continues TUCSON. Ariz., Doe. With publication suspended for the feuond day because of a printers' strike, Tucson Newspaper, Inc., which docs the mechanical work of both the Tucson Daily Citizen and the Arizona Daily Star, today an- protest i nolmced that if something "doesn't brcnk soon we'll have pians for getting out the papers without the strikers." Tlie statement was made by George Chambers, general mana- ger, after Ted Wallace, union spokesman, said the printers had made their final offer last night when they came down to 51.80 cents an hour. "We're standing Chambers said. "We'll be happy to have j them back at the Phoenix scale. We have no plans for publication but will soon if something doesn't break. They caught us unpre- pared." Pickets carrying placards were at.both front and rear entrances of the plant. Editorial, 'business office and advertising workers re- ported for work. The papers, printed in the same plant but separately controlled, were giving i 15-minute radio broadcasts of local news. nOO men was ordered on 1'2 hour j shifts and all days off cancelled, j "People are not going to go hungry because .some minority group wants to stop whether it. he the stores or the unions." York paid. "This is still America and I think the American j people will be behind us." The At'L Council in calling the j 7S sorioiiaiy in at nis home j S2S Oran-e "The membership in POWER RATE PROBE MAY BE DROPPED State Corporation Commissioners Are Divided On Question UV DICK SMITH United Press Staff Correspondent PHOENIX, Dec.' 3 (U.Rl Gov. Sidney P. Oaborn today faced the possibility ot" seeing-" his long- sought investigation of Arizona power rates by the Federal Power Commission go by the boards. That plans were afoot to aban- don it and substitute a survey by experts employed by the State Corporation Commission was dis- closed yesterday by a routine ques- tion asked by the United Press at an informal meeting of the state agency. The question resulted in a public break among the commissioners iind brought the governor from his office in the Capitol to the State building a block a. way in an ef- fort to appease Commission Chair- man Wilson T. Wright and restore harmony on the power question. Pmviicr Explodes The question touched off a pow- der keg on which the commission has been sitting for months. It was based on an informal opinion by Attorney General John L. Sulli- van that a pending suit did not block the commission from going ahead with the federal investiga- tion, for which the 17th Legisla- ture appropriated Sullivan had said that if the commission asked for it, he would draft a formal opinion to this ef- fect. The question asked the coin- mission by the United Press was: "Will a formal opinion he re- "McFate (Commissioner Yale McFate) and I asked for one Sat- replied Commissioner Wil- liam J. .Eden. "It ought to be along in a day or That Tears Things That tore tilings. Color rose in Chairman Wright's face. Blur.tly lie told his colleagues that lie ob-! dehydrating; plant has furnished' a "BIG INCH" PIPELINE LENGTH, 1254 MILES DIAMETER. 2 FEET Officials Deny SENTENCING POSTPONED fPla" UNTIL TOMORROW BY Mllltary Pact JUDGE GOLDSBOROUGH IVIap above shows the "Little Inch" and "Big Inch" pipelines, which the Department of the Interior is considering for emergency gov- ernment operation to carry natural gas from Texas to the industrial northeast to help alleviate fuel shortage caused by coal strike. Three commercial companies, trying to ,buy or lease the lines, are confident that cubic feet of gas a day could be started flowing within Iwo weeks. The "Inch" lines, built during the war at a cost of about to transport petroleum, have maximum capac- ityof cubic -feel of gas a day. Reclamation Era Story Tells How Alfalfa Is Being Dehydrated at Blaisdell Plant, East of Yuma BOULDER CITY, Nev., Dec. 3 alfalfa grown on irri- gated lands is being dehydrated near Blaisdell. Arizona, is told in the December issue of The Recla- mation Era, published monthly by the Bureau of Reclamation on a non-profit basis. Located on the Bureau's Yuma project in southwestern Arizona, has another advantage. The grow- ing season is 12 months, permit- ting operation of the plant all year. In this manner the cost of WASHINGTON, Dei-. ,U.R> j High government officials today flatly denied reports that the j United States and Britain were on j the verge of a secret defense pact! aimed al. Soviet Kussia. "Tlie United States is committed to the United for any international defen.se measures anil is making no pacts secret or otherwise with anybody." one high ranking official said. The denial followed a statement in London by Konni ililliacus. La- bor member of the British Par- liament, that a secret pact was being negotiated. He said it was aimed at Russia. The Laborite's statement created a stir despite denials both in Wash- ington and London. Sen. Glen Taylor. D.. Ida., said j it would be a "shocking revelation" if true. "The people of the United j c States place their faith in inter-] national Taylor said, i and have "turned their backs on the old power politics based on secret treaties." 3 ,upi .ImlU'c T. Alan dnlilshm-uugh to- day asked tnr rccmnmemkitimis (Ml the M-nteneim; of .liihn L. Lewis. iitiorurys for tile I'nitcd .Mini- Workers and the government until 10 a.m. tnmnrrnu to t-vpress their iexvs. Oiimsrl fur both Otililsluirmigli a d j enurt at i 1 :S.1 a. a. m. tomorrow. -sides agreed. u r n i- d the m. until ID i WASHINGTON. Dec. 3 (U.R) Federal Judge T. Alan Goldsbor- j ough today found John L. Lewis j guilty of contempt in the national coal st rike. t The burly room denunciation of attempts to break strikes by injunction. he judge pronounced Lewis anil Uie United Mine Workers j lAt'L) guilty of contempt for I his temrxirary order of j Nov. IS. That order directed them io keep cr.al production go- I ing pending judicial determina- tion of legal issues at stake. j The defense had a chance this nuirmng to present witnesses, but declined to do so. It relied sole- ly on legal arguments and mo- tions in its unsuccessful attempt to win acquittal. Lewis Breaks Silrnrr Lewis, who had remained mute the courtroom over since the u.s PLAN MERG TWO ZONES Will Make Area Self-Sustaining Within 3 Years mrly Mine Workers' chief j contempt procedings started with immediately with a court- his preliminary hearing OP. Nov. Teachers Win Wage Boosts at Minneapolis UV K. II. SHACKFOIM) l.'niteil I'ress Staff Correspondent NEW YORK, Dec. 3- re tan- of State James F Byrnes predicted today that the FOU? i MINNEAPOLIS. Mnn.. Dee. J-- (U.R) A strike by public school teachers was averted today with I settlement of a wage dispute. i The Federations of Men and i Women Teachers uVt'L) accepted a salary proposal last night which set a S'J.OflO minimum and a S3.000 maximum on annual salaries in in-17. The new satai v schedule amounts to a 5000 increase for 19-17. Under the agreement another SGOO in- crease will become effective Jan. 1, This will bring the maxi- mum to 5-1.200. but the minimum will remain at Til addition, regularly employed teachers will receive, a 6150 cost- bonus this month. -'a, broke his silence after the ver- dict was pronounced. Gold.sboroiigh signied his ver- dict by announcing he accepted all of the government's findings of fact and law in connection with the case. AFL Chief Counsel Joseph A. Padwny asked if that meant the judge found Lewis guilty. Goldsborough replied. Padway then asked and obUiin- ed permission for Lewis to make a statement at the bench before hearing sentence. Under the rules of civil con- tempt proceedings, Goldsborough may impose any fine and jail sentence lie sees fit. Lewis' Statement Lewis began bis statement by saying the history of the injunc- tion in relation to labor disputes before 1912 was "a sordid one." That was recognized, he contin- ued, when Congress passed the I Clayton Anti-Trust Act and later in 1932 passed the 'Norris-La- Guardia Anti-Injunction Act. Council of Foreign Minister would i _____ the plant can be amortized in n j begin their preliminary discussions I CHICAGO Dec 3-tu.Ri-- A the article of Germany here this week but I spokesman for SOO teachers in the that probably little more than city's public schools said today roemenl on future procedure that a strike would result if de'- I much shorter rela tes. Illustrated with photographs, the article goes on to describe the A. Chester Is I Seriously III "And as for Sullivan's opinion, desert has made it poss: .1. A. Chester, secretary of the j I huve no respect for he cess as high as 30 tons i unia County Water Users asso- added. i "In addition to the jcctcd to them, or cither of them, acting in the name of the commis- sion in such matters before they had been taken up at an executive meeting. Ala- mcdc'i county lias sanctioned a gen- eral walkout to assure labor peace in this community." Ordered to participate were f Continued 071 I'ntre "it a venue, members of his family have reported. Mr. Chester recently look a leave of absence from his duties in order to regain his health but has become weaker since his return from Los Angeles sonic days a As Cold Hardest Sf self piles Dwindle Arrives; Denver Is ies Exhausted Turning to Eden, be continued that there had been too much teaming up between him and Sulli- van "behind the commission's back." "I don't like it and I'm telling you so Wright said. "You o. did it in the Metropolitan bus fare I ease in which Sullivan, who's sup- posed to represent the commission, sued to set aside a ruling by Mo- Fate and me after both of you had ample opportunity to object at the hearing that preceded the ruling." Not Si new market for alfalfa produced on the irrigated lands around Yu- ma, Arizona. The plant has a rated capacity of 20 tons each 2-1 hours but the extremely dry air of the ible to pro- day. "In addition to the increased efficiency of the plant the opera- tion in the Gila Valley of Arizona will be decided. alfalfa dehydration process and its j Byrnes made his statement at a i i advantages and benefits to alfalfa press conference called growers on the Yuma project. nounce the details: of tb The December issue of The can-British plan clamation Era features other ar- ticles on the Reclamation program in the West. The issue is" the eighth since publication of the j partners" was resumed last Mai-' following mands for a 00 per cent salary are not met. Aineri-- SHA.MOKIN, Pa.. Dec. for economic fu- township schools were closed sion of their occupation xmies of; 1-IK'ay good tin in treating magazine was resumed last May zones as a arc-i _ a 4-year war-imposed j Byrnes and British Korei-n Sec- holiday. Iretarv Ernest Bevi 9-1 teachers made Germany. The plan makes the ll'eir threat to strike for a i United States and Britain "equal bonus and a basic salary increas pupils a joint I Yuma Lettuce Deal Under Way; Threatened by Car Shortage; Acres in Fall-Winter Deal PITTSBURGH. Dec. (u.R) The nation's stockpile of soft coal faded rapidly toward the danger point today as the season's first cold snap doubled consumption. Scores of industries were con- verting heating- equipment to oil and natural gas in an attempt to avert a complete shutdown when existing soft coal supplies are ex- hausted. The number of unemployed re- The refrigerator car shortage. growing more serious with each flay of the soft coal strike, threat- YVhat was more, Wright contin- 1 cncd the Yuma fall-winter lettuce ued, he wns "not. so sure T want deal, growers reported today. Rockefeer suiting from the ID-day walkout of soft, coal miners totaled 515.000 including the 400.000 diggers, and more workers were added to the list hourly. j Denver Hardest Hit Denver, a city of popu- lation, was the hardest hit. Coal] supplies in dealers' yards were exhausted. Many apartment build- ings were without heat and offi- cials .vnrm-d that the city was heading for disaster this week end. All schools were closed. Only about MO.OOO tons of coal were being produced dnlly from a few strip mines still in opnrntion to go ahead with an investigation (Continued on 1'apre fil j The local season started L. jr. McLaj-en Co. The Hogue company is slated to start shipping carrots this week.: Acreage m the Yuma urea plant- I ed to lettuce in the Fall-Winter rotary statenn'-rit said: "Tiie agreement contemplates an economic proirram designed to make the area seir-sustainhur in three years. By this program it is expected not or.ly to decrease the cost of of the area but also to make possible the gradual resoration a healthy i .'nvs.sive Gorman croimmv which i will contribute materially to Un- economic .st.ibilitv Europe." .More Finn) rmmiM'ii The aiireirnu-nt includes n pro-: mi.se by the irmvrnmerits tn increase the present ration slaiul- A total ot" U.-IOO affected. John Manylo. president of tlu.1 Teachers Association, said the walkout will continue until the Hoard of EJnc.it son i: rants the demands. Board Secretary Anthrmv Om- bowsky said the finanrinllv dis- tressed condition of the- district makfs it impossible to grant the bonus. can issue an injunction in any la- bor disputr. Lewis said The United Mine Workers arc in a dispute over working con- ditions in the mines, which in our pus it ion spoils nothing; else but a labor dispir.L-. Lewis said the disputes over working conditions were not set- i tied ;mri that the union was con- vir.rc'l {.hat. its cuniract with fhe i.'ocrriunen had been Outstanding Issue He recalled that on Oct. 21 the had asked tor negotiating conferences with the irovernmoiit said the outstanding "the brutal. 5t-nonr wurli week underground." Twenty-five days later, he said. i Continued on Page il Woman Dismisses Paternity Suit Vs. Henry Fonda HOLLYWOOD. Dec. 3 (U.Ri Actor Henry Fonda was cleared today of any responsibility for the fourth child of Mrs. Barbara Thompson. 26-year-old divorcee. rots. 1.S15 acres. This tuce than last of carrots. year and '.100 les and the Solid Fuels Administra- tion at Pittsburgh reported its emergency stockpile had dwindled i from to tons. I "Domestic pressure for emer- gency supplies definitely is on." 1 said Harry Suiter, SFA" regional director. I A run on anthracite stockpiles by commercial users in New Jer- j sey was reported and in Kentucky. I Bell Comity Judge .Matt Slusher I appealed for federal authority to seize coal in transit for use in county and city buildings and the hospital at Pineville. Ky. j into his car. seduced her that night i Xevaila Appeals j in his El Cenlro. Cal.. hotel room Gov. Vail Pittman of Nevada and kept her there during the two deal was estimated at B.7SS: car-; lird Germany from 1 chickory. L'n I rips tn i.smi calories a -is 600 acres more let-; the world fund supnly permits. Byrnes admitted that tile im- meiliate cost t" tile American lax- A greater acreage is expected; payer under the plan to fin lor the Spring lettuce deal. Uvo mmv win Current lettuce prices are a- proximately SJnO OfiiS mill more i I round S3 per ciate. which is about ifiiT th-m'it u-nul.l h Fruit So.. Warner A Stewart, and I normal.______________________ j Hut he explained thai at tlu- .-n .of three years under the unified plan it is expected that the two I by uperat im; would attain economic He said tiiat v.-oiil if tlie two zones i when tile first car shipped by .lack Brothers McBnrncy. These shippers have since shipped about In additional cars. Last week AI i Masscra and Jack Collier started shipping-. Shippers expected to be- Kin shipments this week include: Tommy Thompson, ipper of Hissing Ship Feared Mutiny, Letter indicates; 2 Bodies Foynd in Lifeboat Off Baja Calif. expressed fears heavy load the ship a heavy sea like a i.'ti Skid Row." IIH who dropped a paternity suit filed three years ago. She had asked S2000 a month i for support of the child. Sharon. Attorney Julian P. Van Dyke. T who filed notice of the dismissal i u ASHINGTON, Dec. for Mrs. Thompson, said he prom- ''Cpnblican senators ised Fonda's attorneys "not to Pat make any comment." Fonda's attorneys also had no comment 4 G.O.P. Solons to Make Public Tomorrow Sensational Report on U.S. Military Government in Germany nsked Secretary of Interior .7. A. I'Krug to allocate II carloads of J coal for emergency use in the j state. Pittmnn also'souaht release I of between and 2.500 tons of slack coal which he said was stood today un their decision to make public tomorrow a reported- ly sensational secret document of American Military Government in The suit brought by Mrs. Thomp- j Ormany. son while the actor was at sea as I They refuser! to withhold it de- a Navy quartermaster charged he j snite reports that Sen. Arthur H. plied her with liquor, lured her I Vandenbenr, of Michigan. Repub- lican foreign policy leader of the Senate, had warned that its publi- cation might "completely wreck" the results of the United Nations weeks he was on location with his last prc-N'avy movie. "The Ox- Dow Incident." Fonda, father of three children. denied he even knew the lady, denied she was a lady and said stored at Reno Army Air Base. she had been married three times Chalmers H Goodlin. nf Pa 23-yenr-old Dell Aircraft test pilot, will take up the Army's new rocket-pro- pelled XS-I on itj, lirst fight under power nt Muroc Field. Calif. Plane's speed is 1700 miles per hour, but Goodlin will fly it ;it averse speeds, below 000 mph, in niili.ii test. now on inactive status. Most communities in Nevada i would be without any coal stocks at all bv Jan. 1, Pittman said. Schools at Detroit eliminated all extra-curricular activities in order to conserve oxistlnsr stocks of fuel land factories at Coldwater. Mich., cut work schedules to three days a week. Some workers in Birming- ham. Ala., steel industries were I affected yesterday when industrial j gas was cut off because of a I shortage of cotil for gas-producing i ovens. and arrested frequently for drunk- enness ami immorality. He charged her with attempting to extort money (she sued for SI plus SMOO a month sup- portl and added: "Her suit is a pretended and unfounded claim against me. It was filed maliciously and without probable cause with the intent to injure me in the esteem of the public and to harass and annoy me. "I certainly rue the day I de- cided to become nn actor, I would have been better off as n fanner." meeting in New York. i ''The report was submitted t" tl j Senate Investigating commit- tee by its chief counsel. George Mender, after a three-week pre- liminary investigation in Europe. But by Friday, he said "tin damage will hace been done Only last week the eommittn voted 6 to 1 along strict party i pi i linos not to follow up the Mcader Koa and Meeting Will Impair Kilgore said that Secretary of State James F. Byrnes and Sen. Tom Connally. D.. Tex., shared the view that release of the report would "seriously impair their ef- forts" at the sessions. Kilgore also disclosed Secretary of War Koberi P. bc- j lief that the doeumeni should he he sunnri'ssfd. a letter view of this re- ind fre- f Mili- The war secretary in N'ov. said "it is the this department that port gives a distorted quently erroneous picture tary Government Data lias Leaked GOP Senators Owen Brewstcr. Me., Homer Ferguson. Mich.. Wil- liam F. Knuwlaml. Calif., and Jo- seph H. Gall. Minn., took the stand that so much of the data contain- j __......._ ed in the document has "leaked" The recuiar monthly meeting of to the that the lull report i the Merchants' Association "f the publisheu. Merchants to Meet should b Chairman Hurley M. Kilgore. P.. W. Va.. bitterly told a press con- ference he not only had refused permission to the Mcader report public, but he had e.illed a meeting for this Friday to discuss a rcmicst that it be published. Yuma county chamber of com merce will be held Wednesday noon. December -I. '.it the Palm room of the Valley cafe. Harold C. Giss, chairman, has announced. All members of the Yuma chain- hnr of commerce are welcome at the meeting. Mr. said. decomposer b today that he he vt'.-is, tiff-ton Costa 1-: i i ica. witii lo n n c i l u 1 i n n f d i i i Shopping Days To Christmas miles south nf ho re. Const llinril pliine U-ft imnieili- te'v to I The owned by .tack L. j Hn.iU, Ji., df I.ns Aniieles, :uul I Dpi-r-.ittMl bv Marine SliippinLr i ami Trailing Cn., wius nitiyinji 301 ti'ns of bananas ami feet of harilwthii] on OeoU. Vt n. Hichnu! K. a highly hi U'oi'kl U'ar nisclnscd recently when present- with In.- fninlli dtatiun, in lieu ci a second of Meril. The famous iHjhn' hero disappeared from ;nibliu nuke in 10-11 to 'n work in both Atlantic and Pat: i lie theaters. TliU in- 'Jitclctt an overall slra- loyii: I'ltiu for the Pacific ntul a hcorct rcconnnissaneo oil u'hoMj basU liic first Guadalcanal of- fenstvt! UuiiH'ht'iJ,   

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