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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: April 19, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - April 19, 1946, Yuma, Arizona                             TUB WBATHBR AT As reported by U. S. Weather Bureau liighvsl lust 2-1 hours...............101 Lowest lust 2-1 Average high this date................85 Average low this date..................55 Kelative humidity at il AND THE TINEL WEATHER FORECAST TO SATURDAY NIGHT Considerable high cloudiness with temperature about the same. VOLUME 93 YUrvlA, ARIZONA Friday, April 19, 19-16 THE ARIZONA SENTINEL- VOLUME 93 U. N. COUNCIL MAY PROBE FRANCO CASE Australian Plan May Be Accepted Next Tuesday nv it. n. Hulled Press SlnlT Cni-respiindenl NEW YORK. April (U.RI The Australian proposal for a for- mal United Nations investigation of the Franco regime in .Spain today had an excellent, ebance of adoption -unless Russia objects. Russian reaction to the proposal to facts rather than speeches whether Franco Spain menaces world peace was, as usual, unknown. Like most of the other Council members, So- viet Delegate Andrei A. Gromyko must seek new instructions from his home government. But initial reaction of other delegations indicated that the Australian plan would find a ma- jority will] only the ever present Russian the Soviets de- cide to oppose in the way of the first United Nations inquiry. Even the Polish delega- tion thought the proposal an "in- teresting one." In "Easier Keeess The. Council was in Easter re- cess until noon PST. Tuesday but when it returns it will be prepared to do the following: the Russians another resounding defeat in the .Iranian case by voting, S to 3, to keep the jurisdiction of the case until May date by which the Russians have promised to have all their troops out of Iran. 2. Vote on the Australian reso- lution to set up a five-nation sub- committee to investigate the Spanish situation and report back by May 17. If accepted, this would defer action on the Polish resolution for immediate diploma- tic quarantine of pro- posal that five of the Council members doomed by opposing the last two days of Council debate. The first month of the Security Council's deliberations in the Unit- ed Slates ended last night after a'nbth'c'r long scries of speeches about Spain and receipt of a re- port, from the Council's committee of experts which voted 8 lo H that the Council could keep a ease on its agenda even if both parties to il requested its withdraw-d. U. of A. Students Threaten to Become 'Long Hairs" Yaquis Refuse to Permit Pictures Of Passion Play is.v SMITH rnih'i! Tress Shift t'nrrospmutriit U A U A1AJI Ariz.. A pril 10 photographer lor Holiday Magazine poIiU'ly but firmly rt'fusoil permission today to take piclures of I ho climactic scenes of the annual Yaqui Indian re- enactment of the betrayal, i-on- crucifixion and resurrec- tion nl' Christ at this aclnbe vil- lage liJ miles from Arizona's cap- ital. Tho Indians said they would Innk upon such an net as doserra- tion. Kven a plea barked by rep- resentatives from the sheriff's of- iii-i; and the Thoenix chamber of commerce failed to cause them to rut-ode from their stand. How- ever-, they said they would wel- come respectful spectators. Today, tomorrow and Easier Sunday imtr the final scenes of a tu'ini-lwrbane Yaqui version of medieval passion plays, which they have staged in observance of and Easter since 3539, when Christianity was carried in- n their remote, valley in Sonora, Mexico, hy Spanish explorers and missionaries. Daaco Tonight Rn-emiclmcnt of the r.rwifix ion will be followed tonight by a, danoe truly pagan. Half naked, fjnrbed in weird headdresses, their bodies painted and oiled, the Indians will stage a mock cele- bration of the downfall of the "false prophet." Rut tomorrow will find them trnnsform.ed into worshippers at the slain Christ's tomb. Again there will be dancing Lo native music, but a change will have uomu over contortions of the dan- cers and rhythm of the music. before a note of blood- lusty vengeance ran through the ceremonies, there first will be manifestations of abnegation and heart-rending surrow, followed as Eastern dawn approaches by a rising tide of expectation and hope that will become a chant of glorificntion and victory. With voice (o n paean of Indians will march in a body to the church where a visiting priest will say mass. A similar observance, of Easter in another Tnqiii village nnnr Tucson was closed to the public thin year by an epidemic of 'liphtheria. Skating Rink to Be UN Home This IHIRC skating rink in Flushing Meadow Park, site of the "City of New exhibit during the 10J9-40 World's Fair, will soon be renovated at a cost of S1.250.UOU, to form the auditorium in which the UN General Assembly will convene on Sept. 3. 'Right to Work' Petitions Being Circulated Here REJECTS DEMAND (THAT HE RESIGN TUCSON, Ariz.. April lil- -lU.d by co-eds who prom- ised not. to date "short-haired sissies." University of Arizona men students today boycotted, hnrhcr shops to protest SI hair- cut prices. The stllduets .said they would be "lonfi-hairs" until prices returned to HO cents. Missouri Woman Hurt In Crash A blowout, apparently caused a u'e.sUjcmml iiiiUi to overturn on U. S. Iligway SO near Aztec this morning, :iml rjiti.sud Mrs. John Monlron of St. Louis, ,Mo.f to lit1 hospitalized. Her injuries wore described ;i.s cut prices. Tho students .snid they was evidently not injured, accord- ing to reports. Asks Atom Death (NKA '1'flcphoia) Earl MeParland, 25, convicted slayer picked up by FBI in Knoxville, Tcnn., following his escape from the Wash- ington District death row, arrives bnek in Washington Monday morn- aeeompanicd by deputy innr- shals. McFarlnnd is lo petition President Truman for permission to die in tho atom bomb tests July 1, H.y KA.I.1'11 TKATSOKTII Unilcd Tress Stal'l' Correspiinileilt TOKYO, April Pre- mier Kijuro ShicIeharfL today re- jected resolution from a com- mittee representing- four Japanese politieal parties demanding the immediate resignation of his cab- inet to make way for "the estab- lishment of a democratic govern- ment." AL the same time. Welfare Min- ister Ilitoshi A.shida, a member of the Liberal party, submitted his resignation, apparently in ac- cordance with his party's stand against the Shidehara government, remaining in power. 'Shiclchara. told the committee, composed of Liberals. Social Dem- ocrats, Cooperatives and Com- munists, that he could not quit "just because you tell me to do so." "I do not think my withdrawal will improve the present situa- the premier said. "Jl. just happens that our views and pian.'i met the situation differently." Committee, members said they would meet tcmorrolv to plan a nafio3inl movement to oust Shide- hnra and his cabinet. Predicted Shidchar.Vs statement came ly H few hours after Cabinet Snc- retary Wataru Narahashi said that'the cabinet "is considering, the question resigning en bloc, in order lo stabilize the politir-al situation." auri ne.vspapers had predictnd he cabinet, would resign few days." "The government fully respec.tr. the attitude of the various politi- cal pnrtier. and is even consider- ing the question of resigning in oidcr to stabilize Ihe pol- itical sitnatiun." Narahashi said. Leaders of Japan's major polili- cal parties, with the exception of tho Progressives which reccnly accepted Shidchara's application for membership, have joined pre.ss and labor in demands that the present government resign immediately. 37 Persons Placed >n Jobs In March By USES Office Thn Yunia U, H. Employ incut Service offii'G placed S7 persons in jobs during Mnrch. Mnnngcr Herherl Connor has announced. Eiphty-ono placements were made in February. Now applirnUons for work filed with the local office in March number 120 as compared with 140 in February. The movement which was started in Phoenix ,six: months ago by a group of war veterans, spread to Yuma Ihis wcolt with the eirculaLion of tlona to place an nmendment on tlie November Arizona ballot. James G. DeVVolf, a Pacific j war veteran discharged in Feb- ruary, is in Yuma this week on behalf of the Veterans' Right-to- Work committee of Arizona. Petitions for signatures of Ari- zona voters are in circulation here, to gain the names required to put a measure before the Ari- zona voters in the November elec- tions. The proposed constitutional amendment reads: "No person ahull be denied the opportunity to obtain or retain employment because of non-mem- bership in a labor organization, nor shall the state or any sub- division thereof, or' any corpora- tion, individual or association of any kind enter into any agreement, wi-itten or oral, which excludes any person from employment or continuation of employment be- cause uf non-membership in ;t la- bor organization." Makes SlnfonifMif The committee, which is com- posed of .six Phoenix war veter- ans, embodied their beliefs in this j statement; "During the war, we were praised for fighting to preserve f reed n in. But we re tu rn cd fro m the war to discover that one of our fundamental freedoms has been taken away from us during our absence! "This is the right to work, with- out joining a labor organization unless we choose to do so. We, the Veterans' Right-to-Work com- mittee of Arizona, believe that we and all citizens should have the privilege of association or non- assoniation with ail organizations." Says Doughnut Problem Was Nut Too Tough to Crack TIIKItMOl'OI.IS, April (U.R) Mike. Savaresy dis- closed today he sold out his doughnut business, "If you make the holes he said, "il takes mure dough in arniind Iheni. If you make (he, hnles small, il lakes inoru dough to fill the hole. "M was driving mo So 1 sold mil." Gov, Osborn Adds 2 Points to Special Session Call PHOENIX, Ariz., April Sidney P. Osborn's call summoning the Legislature inlo special session next Tuesday to- day contained two additional points, one drawn lo bencfil Mesa, Ihe other for Preseott. Osborn announced lasl night lhal .he would ask the lawmakers1 to amend the present law govern- ing' school consolidations so lhal Ihe Mesa district can absorb Alma, and to clarify the jurisdiction of police courts lo remove doubts concerning powers of the minor judiciary in Prcscolt. Previously, the governor dis- closed that his call contained three major studenl housing facilities al the state's three institulions of higher learn- ing, a higher maximum of old age assistance and direct relief grants, and revision of the now- inoperative law pel-milling crea- lion of a central agency for acquir- ing surplus government property and supplies. Osborn said he will make spe- cific recommendations lo the legis- lators when they convene at 10 a.m. Tuesday. Hew Walkouts Raise Strike-Idle In U. S. to MARSHALL SEEKS TO END CHINESE WAR Narionalist Forces Holding Out In Changchun RAN KUA.NTISCO, April 111 KiivtTiiiiieiil monitor reported imliiy the Shinsha News Agency broadens! from that Hie .NorthcaM- ern lleumcraf ic (Communist) Army i-apturi'd capital of .Manchuria, at 7 p.m. yesterday. The message recorded hv the K. S. Information Service" said [hi- army had taken control of the city and "sel up n democratic government." Wallace Speaks At L A. Jackson Day Meeting LOS ANCttLKS, April iU.R) ......Secretary of Commerce Henry A. Wallace bonevcs that, a Re- publican victory next fall would usher in ;i. cycle of "boom, bust chaos." He told a. .Jackson Hay aiidio.nro publican parly hud proved itself of last night that the Rc- to be the parly of reaction. "Fortunately, these agents of reaction have reckoned without j the will of the American people. that all-powerful instrument he "Progressive forces must keen control' of the- nut ion tn iiiRnrv both political ami economic 'jrm- ocracy for tin- United States." Tu prevent "nnom, bust- and Wailnce urged that. Pres- ident Truman "he givrn the tools "It is national he sniff, to work with." "when the people elect. ;i pnigres-_ sive president, ami :i n-actmnaiy j congrer-s, or vice. No Charges Filed In Stabbing Case Police Uhicl' Hiirnld Breech re- ported this morning thyt rhirry Bnbb, who was invesig'fitcU in tho WiulncHtlay night .stabbing-of Prod fvt, had been released   by strikes. Only three Minnesota companies have readi- ed agreements with the CIO Uni- ted Steclworkers union, winch called a .strike Feb. 1 to enforce demands for an cent hourly wage increase. Negotiators for the nations soft coal operators left. Washing- ton. They agreed to return, turn- over whenever Secretary of La- bor Lewis B. Sehwellcnbach lluumhl a contnii-l could be work- ed mil. with the AFL United Mine Workers union, which represents 400 000 striking miners. A presidential fact-finding! board recommended a Hi-cent' hourly wage increase, and some rules' changes for engi- neers nnd trainmen represented by two brotherhoods which have threatened to strike. Union rep- re.sentatives were meet, at Cleveland to vote on the board's findings. Earthquake Felt At Riverside, Cal. LOK ANCEI-KS, April A very -slight earthquake shook some .sections of southern Cali- fornia today at a.m.. PST. The movement was not felt in Los Angeles. Reports from Ilivcrside. 50 miles southeast ol Los Angeles, said two moderate shocks were felt. The .seismograph at California Insli- tule of Technology recorded the minor earth movement. Price Slump Halts Salt River Valley Lettuce Deal PHOENIX. Ai-ix.. April lft--iU.R) With the murkoi glutted and the htHtiiin laihnp out of prices, Salt Valley lettuce to- tiay annoumvd abiUKlonmo.nl of some M.OOO t-arlojids .still uneul in the fields. "livery cnite I packed yesterday meant H loss of fiQ cents." one shipper saiil, "I just folded up without filling the car spotted at shed." No estimate of total losses taken by tho lettuce growers and ship- pers this season was forthcoming, hut they have been disastrous for some. One heavy lusor- his loss was FOUR-POWER COUNCIL GETS U. S. WARNING Resists Proposal To Restrict U. S. Witnesses TOKYO, April IS The Allied Four-Power Council, sharp- ly divided over a British proposal to restrict witnesses explaining Gen. Douglas Mac-Arthur's policies, received an American warning to- day "not to pry into tho supremo, commander's, armor for soft spots." Britain. Russia and China lined CHlhYGKINO, April 111 (U.n> Gen. George C. jilungert today into a scries of consuitn- tions on the. Manchurian crisis preparatory to a now effort to lia.lt Nationalist-Communist hos- tilities. Marshall conferred with his military and diplomatic, advisers to obtain the. background of de- velopments while he was in tho United Slates. He consulted Pre- mier T. V. Soomr and Francis Hi-inks, chief of staff of his military advisory primp. To- night he planned 'to dine with Generalissimo Chi.-inc; Kai-Shek ami Mine. Chiang-. .Marshall's consultations took on urgency in the face of reports that. Communist artillery had placed under heavy fire the iso- lated remnants of the Nationalist garrison in Changchun. In Knur Buildings The Changchun Nationalists were said to bo barricaded in four downtown buildings. It appeared doubtful they would he able tn hold out until the arrival of re- inforcements. The Kuomintaong controlled Central News Agency indicated that the fall of the "Manchurian capital to the Communists was at hand. It snid the city's fate proba.bly would be decided today. 1 A Central dispatch quoting Mukden military quarters said' the Communist, were attacking in Changchun with four or five med- ium tanks whose drivers and gun- ners arc "officers of a certain country." "H is obvious that the tanks are supplied by a certain coun- try." the dispatch added. It said a, Soviet plane flew low over Changchun on April 10. nisputches said the government troops, withdrawing with heavy casualties, had barricaded theln- selves in the Centra! Rank, police headquarters, the power company and the postoffice building, moldings an- Shelled field guns battered the bank' and power company buildings ceaselessly yesterday with incendiary shells. Defenders inside the postoffice. building were said to be maintaining wireless communication with the world. Gen. Tu Yu-Ming. government that .strong Communist forces j were, concentrated north of Kung- chuting, between and] Changchun. He anticipated stiff resistance lo the Nationalist First Army moving up tin; Mukden- Changchun tailroad toward the capital. Tu said the Communist forces I included regulars and irregulars. Lt. John W. Rohrer Returns From Service said to approach suf- j, together in favor of a proposed, tered a nervous breakdown and j pJoceSural rulc by whi h cil would control all witnesses ap- pearing before it, including the form and quantity of their evi- dence. The United States strongly re- sisted the proposal. Brig. Gen. Courtney Whitney, who made a is confined to a hospital. Over-production and overlapping of the Salt River Volley deal with that of the Salinas, Calif., area. due to early arrival of hot wea- ther, were among causes contrib- uting to the situation. With 200 cars daily going from Salinas to market while the Phoenix deal was Valley meant a loss on every car shipped. Countrywide demand does not exceed cars a day. "Demand very slow, market weak, best lettuce 51.50 to a crate in carlots F.O.B. Phoenix." was the way the Federal-State Crop Reporting Service summed it all up. The Yuma area fared belief be- cause bulk of its crop was moved before the big break in prices. Shipments from there were (Contir.ucd on Page 6) three-hour speech before the Coun- Wednesday, said the United Farm Bloc Solons Muster forces to Eliminate OPA ers appearing to defend MacAr- thur's occupation policies. i Uecision is Made Finally, the Council decided that requests for specific information from Supreme Headquarters auto- matically would solve the problem of, presenting evidence to the Council. It also adopted a priority system for submitting items to the agenda. The British proposal was obvi- ously aimed at Whitney for his lengthy filibuster on Wednesday. American representatives said any attempt to limit invited speakers would be "undemocratic and a vio- lation of the principles of free speech." The. Council adjourned until Ap- ril 30. The Russians asked that the Council take up at that lime a British request for information on a directive dissolving holding com- panies. BACK OF THE HEADLINES Wes'rern'Air Lines To Bring Service To YiiiTia Soon j Western Air Linos officials met i yesterday with members of the} Ynma county aviation commission, the hoard of supervisors and LI. Col. .lean .Miller of the Yuma Army Air field for the purpose of gathering information necessary to establish air service between Yuma and the Imperial valley. Representing the air lines were Ai Apablasa. Russell .1. Smith and Marion W. Lnmlcs. Mr. Landcs said today that they had been able, through their conferences with officials here, lo check all facilities at the air field and with- ing a short time would be able to make definite plans for bringing service to Ynma. These plans would be announced with a' few weeks, Mr. Landes said. P.V I.OI'IS KKK.MI.K I'liilcd Tress Sliiff Correspondent In the midst of the heated ses- sions of the United Nations Se- curity Council in New York, the P.ig Four are preparing for the meeting of their foreign ministers in Paris next. Thursday. Highly controversial matters art- slated to come before the I'rench. Rritish, Prussian and United Slates ministers in their endeavor to clear tile way for the conference on European peace treaties which it is hoped can be held in Paris next month. Despite the inability of the min- isters' deputies to reach even a tentative agreement on their cur- rent London meetings, a dispatch from London reports a feeling "f optimism among British officials that the ministers themselves will he able to break the deadlock. Hasis Unexplained The basis for such a feeling was not fully explained. However. British quarters were represented as believing that Russia's own in- terests will move her to compro- mise on rontfoversia.l issues in Kalians and Mediterranean. The icasnmng is that Britain, llu- United States and France do not think Hi- economic recovery of Italy and of Europe in general ran really start until peace has been arr.'tngod. They suspect that Russia may that the prin- ciple applies equally to the Hal kans. in which the Soviet Union is deeply interested as a [eeder area for her post-war The idea that tin- western pow- ers might sign separate peace treaties in Kurope ot Russia balks on a general agreement, which was advanced by anonymous .sources in Washington, was rejected in informed London quarters as ab- surd. Such a move, it was pointed out. would torpedo the essential idea of post-war collaboration among the big powers, and would prove impracticable in any ease. Cosi of Regardless of the hopeful view taken in some London quarters, the fact remains that there will have to be it great deiil of give and take on both sides if harmony (Continued on Page G) I First Lieutenant .Mm W. cr arrived at the home of his parents, Mr. ami Mrs. .Mm K. Kohrer. avenue. April Hi. Lt. Rohrer is on Icnmna! leave, from tin- Army Kittli Knrht- er Air Force, l.'Mst An- squadron, in In- s.i-.v i cointt.it 'iuty in !ht- Philippines j from February In (In- end -it! the war. Hr si.--, stall..-i.-.l :il a.'i purl i.f tin- nri-llpiltlonal r.'iC es fririi Octiihrr to near the i-nd j of Fchruary frur.i tim.. .1 ni'inth was sjx-n' awaiting tran-i- portation home. I i> w.-rr .1 ('.imp Menle I.I. j cr is 1'iitillfl tn wi-ai tin- Medal, Asialli -I'.inln ili-.l Pinl- ippme Libera li-.'ii .in .-'even battle stars. WASHINGTON. April --Farm state senators massed today for an attempt to Ivnch llii! OPA. They rallied around. Sen. Elmer Thomas, D., Okln., -who- intro- duced an anicmlmcnl to the price control extension bill which would let OPA control almost nothing but rents. Other farm-minded sunalors prepared other restrictions, and there was an increasing feeling that OPA would fare little better in tho Senate than it did in the House. The Hoti.se voted to heat most, of the life out of OPA before passing and sending lo the. Senate an amendment-riddled bill yester- day to extend the agency for nine months beyond the present June expiration date. The vote was to 12 for the final version of the measure, which Price Chief Paul Porter said could cause a -10 per cent rise in the cost of living. Provisions The House bill would end subsidies at the end of 1946. meat .subsidies .Ittne .'to. and guarantce "rea.sonnble" profits to producers, distributors and retailers on every item. Pa.'isagc of the bill had hardly been recorded in congressional records whi-n the alarmed Porter issued an anguished appeal for the Senate to avert the predicted multi-billion dollar rise in livini; rosin. He saiii the House version a- mounted to "repeal of price con- trol." fiiri-ini; the OPA to remove i-eiliims on commodities making lift at least, half the cost of living. He said these included meat. milk, coal, many textiles ami nearly ail dairy products except, tiulti-'i-. He torecust soaring prices for automobiles, electric refrigerators, i idios and m'tst household appli- with no restrict if 'ns 'in fai-i: pro'htct.'i. Oth'M- OPA (cured widrspre'ni buvmg and hoarding. I'liiim Clttl i I'n'si'h-ni. Philip Mnir-iy Killed Ins nni'iiis ihrnughiHi! -.iiinlry to "act a! once" to v.-rv ni'-mber tn protest ongressm.i-t against the i' hill Murray i i! "killed rontr.il am! ilrslp-yed the Reveals Dog Went Wild, By Female Coyote Ariz.. April --The story of a dog- that, lured by a female coyote, reverted to type, deserted his master and set out with his wild mate on a stock-killing rampage highlights the March report of the U. S. Fish and Wildlife service. Reporting on the drive to ex- terminate predatory animals in Arizona, District. Director E. M. Mercer said the dog and his mate were killed by a federal hunter in the Ohaco mountain range af- ter they killed slock near the home of the dog's former master in the area. Instances of m.'lle dogs going wild are not nmisual, but few- cases have been reported of do- mesticated females being lured However, Mercer recalled a case where, the owner of a female dog near Flagstaff was forced to confine the animal to keep her from answering the call of a male lobo. Federal himtew exterminated 60.', predators in the state in March, including Gofi coyotes, 37 bobcats and ore mountaiiv lion. The latter was t.iken in Kaibab National Forest. For Auto Phones l-l.- more to H-.-itrict i il'.v nclivitiiv. On the oilier il-'M I. s.i-iii- m- Republicans expected ttf i d'A <-xl.-nsnin hill to be treated mm.- im-leiatelV ill Hie Seiliit'. Tln-v "pposi I the Hospital Notes April IS (iino. Somcilon: liahy wouli' lit'' co- Mary .Si.iniTton. rmnoiltmv cu'vminli- Uirthv I cotton :inil cut ton To Mr. and lleiln-il milk, livestock, poultry, as Kinney. Vuma. mi Apr. a son j xveiKhini; right puiinds and 11 I jCarl Ammons, Junior, Home For Footer Visit Pleads Guilty to Forgery Charge U. Ain.nvms. Jr. is home l.ntlier WilliMin is schcilulcil Easter vacation. Ho is en- tn riv.-ive sentence next Thursdayiriillivl Arizonn State col- for the crime of forgery, nt Flacstnrf. His parents are lileailinj; guilly to the chixrRe in Mr. and Mrs. Carl Ammons of Superior court here yesterday. I 712 Scconil avenue. f.Vr'.-l Telcphotn) Streple.iai.-k Roy Venton worKS nt ,mh of i.-uttiiiK liutl ball aerial iitop tho flagpole al u Francisco tele- phone building, despite btious winds. When job Is n'mplcted, in about SO days, telephone communication be- tween antes, trucks and homes or offices will start on an experimental bails.   

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