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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: March 21, 1946 - Page 1

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - March 21, 1946, Yuma, Arizona                             THE WKATIIKK AT VU.MA As reported by U. S. Weather Bureau Highest last 21 hours...............7U Lowest last 2-1 hours..................-42 Average high this date..............TO Average low t'.iis dale................01 Relative humidity 11 a.m.......SO'.i AND TINEL WEATHER FORECAST TO FRIDAY NIGHT Some cloudiness and cool. VOLUME 68 YUMA, ARIZONA Thursday, March 21, 19-16 THE ARIZONA SENTINEL- VOLUME 68 GOERIN6 IS CALLED LIAR AT TRIAL No. 2 Nazi Denies Knowing of Orders To Kill RAP Men Stimson Says U.S. Cabinet Decided in November 1941 to Go to War if Jap Forces Invaded Southeast Asia Uy WALTKK C'KOMUTIC I'nilrd I'ress Stall Correspondent NUERNUEKU. March 21 Sir David Maxwell Fyfe, British prosecutor, accused Hermann Goer- 15V JOHN I.. OUTTKK I'nilnl I'rcss Staff Correspondent I WASHINGTON, Mar. The laic President Roosevelt and his war cabinet agreed 10 days before Pearl Harbor Ihul the United States should fight if Ja- pan invaded Southeast Asia, it was revealed today. The decision was reached at a While House meeting: Nov. 2S, 1'J'll. It was described in a state- ment filed bv former Secretary of ing today of lying on the witness which he yot. Short has told the committee hc alerted his command only against sabotage because that course was indicated in his advices from Washington. Ilasis of Derision The decision of Mr. Itooscvelt and his war cabinet to fight Japan if she invaded Southeast Asia was based, Stimson said, on ment that if a Japanes force then known to be EISENHOWER URGES DRAFT EXTENSION If Granted Army Can Release All Fathers By Sept. WASHINGTON. Mar. Eisenhower, army task beaded _ War Henry L. Stimson with. Con- j down Ihe China coasl got into I'carl Harbor investigating his story that be did not know of orders to kill the airmen until it was too late. '.'I am suggesting that you are lying and leaving responsibility on the shoulders of your junior offi- cers." Fyfe said. According- to the affidavit, Lieu- tenant General Grosch protested against the shootings to General Fuerster of the German air force and demanded that Coering be in- formed. Reports lo Milch "We decided the best way to reach Goering was through Gen. .Erbard Milch, and Fuerster called Milch for an appointment. He left On Nov. 25 the war cabinet tle- ided that responsibility for cou- nt at- be maneu- vered inlo firing the first shot without loo greatly the. United States. The cabinet ruled endangering stand when he said hu did not i know of orders to kill Royal Ari Force fugitives from a prison ctimn. I I'lict-- if it he Bering denied nn affidavit by p.ia.s. stimson ,aid it was a Ocnera Vosthoff, who said j [C1. nf how j couW .shal VVilhelm Keitel reported Goering had reproached him for Iiermitling the escape of the RAP men from the notorious Slalag Lufl .III prison camp. Squirming uncomfortably, Goer- ing also denied Westhoff's state- ment thai Goering attended a con- ference with Adulph Hitler, Hein- rich Himmler and Keitel al which Keitel called for Ibc shooting of escaped prisoners. .Snaps AIIMVCI-K Snapping answers lo K'yfc's sharp questions, Gocring stuck U oul botli a do-nothing allitnde or an attack without warning on the south- wnrd-adviincing Japanese. This country did not know Unit another Japanese force was then starting for Pearl Harbor. Accuses Short Stimson said Miij. Gen. Walter C. Short, who was deposed army commander in Hawaii soon after the Jap allack, "betrayed a. misconception of his real duly which is almost beyond belief." The committee recently com- pleted three months of public bearings aimed at placing the blame for the disaster to the U. S. Fleet when' Japan attacked it at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 10-11. The committee report is due June 1. Stimson. 7S and ailing, filed bis statement and excerpts form his private diary in lien of testimony before tbc joint House- Senate committee. He said Short, despite some er- 1 j rors by bis superiors in Wasbing- L ton. should have been on full immediately, and returned shortly alert against the possibility of .to he had reported to Milch i hostile. Japanese action even with- and Milch made the necessary oul a. warning from Washington, tbc affidavit said. Gocring asked Fyfc why iYlitch had not been questioned about the affidavit. "Hc was P'yfe re- plied, "but lie has the sa.mc story as yours. I suggest that you both are.lying." Gocring admitted lie advised Count Galcazzo Cia.no, Italian for- eign minister, on Oct. 23. to adopt ruthless mensurcs against partisans, including shooting. Paul 0. Rothi Dies Here; To Be Buried on Coast 0. L BAKER IS CHOSEN ELKS EXALTED RULER .Burial of Paul 0. Rothi, who died nl his home on Soulb Seventh avenue Tuesday night, will be made in Glendale, Calif., in the Forest Lawn Atemorial park, Johnson's mortuary announc- ed this morning. Mr. Rothi, husband of Huldii IE. Rothi, is survived by two brothers living in Minnesota, two sisters living in Idaho, and five children, one of whom, Paul Kothi, lives U. L. Baker was chosen Exalt- ed Ruler of the Benevolenl and Protective Order of Elks at its election of officers last ..night. Other officials named were Nor- j man Bann, Esteemed Leading Knight: Ersel Byrd. Esteemed Loyal Knight; Kenneth Crowder, Esteemed Lecturing Knight; Ira Whiting. Secretary; L. C. Din- gess, Treasurer; John Wadin. Til- er; C. L. Glcason, Trustee, and O. R. McPhcrson, alternate to Grand Lodge. Four out of lown guests were. present for the meeting. They were Dr. Veddcr, G. L. White, Lowell Hopkins and Art Nelson, all from the Redondo lieach Lodge. Ten candidates will bu initialed ncxl Wednesday, Mar. 27, and it The late Mr. Rothi came to Yu- ma. three years ago lo be employed as a. civil engineer the (J. .S. Reclamation bureau here. Hc. was affiliated witli the Melhodist church, the Masonic lodge and the Eastern Star. He- was born in Minnesota in JS70. Surviving brothers are Peter and Albert Kothi; sisters are Ma- rie Rot hi mid Kmma.Melby. His children arc: Paul RoSln. Yuma; Mrs. Ellen Layton. Wil- mington. Calif.; Robert Rolhi, Los Angeles: John O. Rothi. Exe- ter, Calif.; ami Mrs. Marie Pruitt, El Ccntro. No date has been sot for tbc Glcndalii burial. Battleship Nevada Painted Orange As Atom Bomb. Target LONG BKACH. Calif., March 21 The battleship USS Neva- da, 30-year-old veteran of two world wars, was getting a coat of wns nmionnccd dance for the that Elks the benefit hospitnl in Tucson would be held here Mar. 30. TL is the only Elks dance of the year at which members are charged admission. The stalled new officers will be April W. R. Am- mnns. District Deputy Grand Ex- alted Ruler Arizona stalling officer. North as in- cbief of stuff, said today that if the draft is extended the army will be able to release all fathers "by August or early September." Eisenhower told the House Mili- tary Affairs committee that the draft should be extended indefin- itely to help the United States meet its world obligations and to release men who have been in ser- vice for a great length of time. Frank Knox; former Army Cliicfl Eisenhower and Secretary of tbc Gulf of Siam it would endan- ger liritisb, Dutch and American interests in the Pacific. The war cabinet meeting he de- scribed in his diary entry of Nov. 2S was attended by Mr. Roosevell; former Secretary of State Cordcll Hull; the late Secretary of Navy of Staff Gen. Geor and formci lions Adm :r Cbief oC Naval Opera- urged Hint, in addition to cxtend i. Harold R. Stark, the draCt, Congress approv Maintenance Men Return to Work in 46 G.M. Plants UMTIC1) I'KKSS Cleanup and maintenanc e C. Marsball, I War Itobcrt P. Patterson botb d- e legislalion giving tbc armed forces a 20 per cent pay increase. Patterson told tbc commitlce thai if Ihe pay increase helped tlie army obtain a sufficient vo- lunteer strength to match re-- not hiivc lo induct any men at all." o Purposes I'attcrson said .extending Ihe draft would serve Uvo "It will stimulate recruiting and returned to work today at -16 of il wi" means of meel- Gcncral Motors corporation's 92 dcficieiices resulting from inability to recruit all the men the. Wcstinghousc Electric Corp. strike. International Harvester Co., meanwhile, announced it bad of- fered the CIO Farm Equipment Workers an IS cent hourly pay boost contingent on settlement of T "11y. Trc other contract issues after strik Scl releasing. 'M-h that than IS strike-bound auto plants, but hope! mobility faded for an early settlement of "ceded." Eisenhower said that if Con- gress is willing lo extend the draft, the army would be wiHin; io have ccrlain condilions and re- slriclions included in Die act. Hc said he would be willing not. induct any more fathers and now i in service. Hc said it would "be crs return to their jobs. Company and union officials will meet today to discuss the offer. Thirty t h o u s a u d Harvester workers have been on strike for 59 uays over a 30 per cent wage increase demand. The 121-day-old United Auto Workers (CIO) strike against CM kepi workers idle, and Westinghouse w o r k e r s stayed away from their jobs for Lhc CGlh day. Other strikes across the nation affected more than workers. Demand is Ke.jcctcd Top UAW officials rejected a General Molors demand thai all locals be ordered lo end Ihe strike immediately. GM said that non- union maintenance and cleanup perfectly feasible to say man shall serve longer months." Both Eisenhower and Patlcrson said, the army could nol obtain u sufficient number of men unless the draft is continued beyond its present May 15 expiration date. Four Boys After False Fire Alarm Early Today men would return only to those] A .1 (-year-old youth was booked in the county jail this morning after a false fire a.laarm was turn- ed in shorlly after midnighl last night. The boy. whose name was not revealed, was arrested after the plants where union locals havej fire department made a run to orange paint, today to identify bet as the bullscye for the atom bomb tests. CHILDREN SOCIETY EXECUTIVE VISITS YUMA COMMITTEE Willinm P. Hauser. stale execu- tive secretary of the Arizona so- cicty for crippled children, is here today to visit the Yuma commit- tee. it was announced by Mnrcia Birmingham, county chairman. Mr. Hauser will confer with lo- cal persons regarding the drive lor funds to provide medical care for the state's crippled children. The Easter stamp sales campaign which begins next week will be led by M. .1. Hackell. Tonight Mr. Hauser will visit the Business and Professional Wo- men's club during their regular mecling. Anyone interested in assisting the project, or desiring to obtain information, should contact Mr. Aayy officers said the Nevada Hauser Ihrough Mrs. Birmingham. would be stationed in the exact center of the '100-ship guinea pig fleet to be anchored at Bikini Atoll for the A-Bomb tests in May. She was ordered painted bright orange from stem to stem above the Visititiq In ship, they ,s in Yuma vlsllinp health officers on business. settled plant grievances. The corporation warned thai none of Ihe production workers would be recalled while any of the union locals continued to strike. Fifteen locals have not reported yet on the questions of ratifica- tion of the naliona! conlracl and returning to work pending sctlle- menl of local grievances. More than 30 locals have voted to stay off the job until such grievances arc settled. Offer is Re.jcclcd The United Electrical. Radio and Machine Worker (CIO) strike against Westinghonse went into ils 6Glh day with no settlement sight after Ihe union had re- jected a company wage increase offer of 1H.1 cents per hour. The union, holding to a demand for a minimum hourly increase of '-L- cents, maintained that the company offer actually amounted to only 9.7 cenls an hoiir. II also said ibal 10.000 lamp workers would receive "no increase at but Westinghouse replied thai these workers would be covered by a "separate agreement." The wage offer, first made by Weslinghonsc in the dispute, was submitted yesterday. Negotiations for a new bitumin- ous coal contract continued at Washington. Sixth street and Orange avenue and found no fire. Three oilier, younger boys, were taken inlo custody at the same time by Fire Cl-ncf George R. Rob- inson. Caught in aJi alley about two blocks from the alarm box, the boys at first denied turning in the alarm, saying sonic other boys did it. Later, however, one of them admitted it. Robinson said. The case is to be turned over to Judge Henry C. Kelly in juvenile court, it was said. C. of C. Board of Directors to Meet The regular semi-monthly meet- ing of the board of directors of the Yuma county chamber of co.n- mcrce will be held Friday noon. March 22, al the luncheon mom of the Valley cafe, it was announc- ed today by C. G. Rkslrom, vice president. President Says He Hopes Rationing Will Not Be Necessary WASHINGTON'. March 21 -President Truman said today he would not objccl lo a return lo wartime food rationing if it be- comes absolutely necessary. .Mr. Truman commented at bis news conference "on a suggestion j this week by Herbert H. Lehman, j retiring director general of the United Nations Relief and Kehabil- itation Administralion. Unit war- time food controls be reinstated in all nations participating in KRA. Lehman suggested that re- inslalemeiit of rationing would be one way of helping to feed starv- Jng peoples. Asked how he fcii. aboul Leh- man's proposal, the president said if il became absolulely necessary, he would nol objecl to a relurn to rationing. Mi. Truman added Ibat ralioning ivas nol yet absolutely necessary and said he hoped it would not be- come so. Frances Maule to Address B.P.W. Club State Convention Sessions Here Saturday and Sunday MUs Knincos Manlo, i-dilor 1 Inuepoiuk-nl. Woman, m. nxine of the Business and T nnl Women's clubs, will dress two meetimrs of the y.oim state eon vent ion OL the a ad P W clubs hero Satur and Sunday. aeeerdint; to Editor to Speak At BPW Convention OPA PLANS PRICE BOOSTS ON RENT FOOD To Announce Soon Increases In New Car Prices t .Second avenue. Main sessions will begin Saturday at 9 a.m. at j the clubhouse, with Dr. Josie j Tnnkle, president, presiding. Fol- lowing regisiraton. addresses ol" welcome and a business session then- will be a barbecue dinner at noon, A banquet at the Masonic Tem- ple at 7 p.m. will be featured by aii address by Miss Maulc, who will ulsii speak at a breakfast meeting- Sunday morning at the homo of Mrs, John Bretz in the tiila valley. Clubhouse Knlnrged j The clubhouse was recently en- iMiss Frances Maule, editor of the Independent Woman, official magazine (it the business uml 1'ro- Women's clubs, is pictur- CHICAGO. March 21 (U.R1 Ml above. She is to he principal speaker at the Ariy.onu slate con- vention of clubs til he held in Yuma tfaturdav and .Sumlay. OPA said Price next some Administrator Paul Porter today that the Office of Administralion wilhin the few days would announce price increases on rents, food and clothing "near the pres- ent level." "The consumer will be afforded maximum Porter said at a new conference in disclosing that the OPA planned to allow the price bulge. Porter also announced that the OPA wilhin -IS hours will an- nounce, price increases on auto- mobiles ranging from S2 on Ihe low priced cars to a maximum of on Ihe mosl expensive models. "In a short time wu will have a detailed announcement of dras- tic measures to be taken to con- trol the meat black market, par- ticularly wilh rcspecl lo diversion of live calllc." Porter said. "We absolutely will not take controls off meat." "There will he some increases in rent, food, and clolhing. but we will try lo bold Ihcm and basic cosl of living items at or near the present level." Porter said. Porler said tbc increased aulo prices will nol affect the con- sumer. He said Ihe OPA was considering passing the price in- creases on to dealers. Hc emphasized that the OPA has no intention of removing rent ceilings. "If the ceilings were moved." be said, "it is estimated thai renls would go up at least 55 per cent." The OPA chief said he believes the textile problem is being taken of and predicted that more clothing would reach the market soon. Porter said many building ma- terials arc being diverlcd from housing lo ccrlain lypcs of 11011- essenlial commercial construction. Hc said hc had been told thai iiO per cent of the southern stilt wood is being diverted to non- legilimule channels. program as announced by Miss Kuth Foster, prc.sident of Lhu Yuma club. Miss Maule is also author of several hooka on careers for wo- men. Delegates will be welcomed bYi- day night at the clubhouse on STATE EVIDENCE UNDER WAY AT ADAMS TRIAL larked and new furniture pur- chased and us now ready for the convention delegates. Motel res- have been nirtdo for 75 out of town delegates. Miss Foster announced two ad- ditional ron vent ion committees. Out' is the press and radio com- mittee and is composed of Mos- Kathryn Haughtolin, Vir- l Continued on Papre 61 I Anniversary Mass Mar. 24 For 1st It. Jesus Cortez An masy will be said at the Imniacubti: Conception church Sunday, Mar. 24. at a. m. for 1st Lt. Jesus who was UiDod in France on Mar. 24, one year ago. Jesus Cortex was a graduate of Yuma Union school and was prominent in high scliool athletics and extra euivicular activities. He was a paratrooper with the lOl.st Airborne division when hc was killed. Jesus i.s survivitl by two broth- ers, three .sisters and an aunt: they arc 1st I-t, Clyde Cortcz, Joe Cor- tex, now attending the University of Arizona. Helen Cunningham. Refugia. Hodges, Carmen Domin- guez, and Mrs. Mike Padercz, aunt. BACK OF THE HEADLINES I.Ot'IS KKK.MI.K I'nilc'd I'rc.ss SliiFf Ciim-spmidrnt Departure nf a British cabinet mission for India to attempt -i solution of Ihal country's politic il future cninddcd with a new mil burst in tin: Soviet press against "Imperialist." plotlin in the Miil'Hr lOa.st. An article in the Suvict papcr Trud. organ of Ihe guvein- menl c.o n t. r o 1 1 c, d trade unions, charged an attempt by what it called reactionary forces to form an anti-Soviet eastern bloc made np of the Arab stales, including Iraq, plus Turkey. Iran and Af- ghanistan. Want 1'p The article, by the Soviet his- torian V. Lutxky. purported to be a definition of the Soviet atlitu.ic toward the Arab states ami Pales- tine. It actually fits in with the Soviet desire to sec Ihe British Empire, broken up. H was neatly to accord wi'.h developments in India and Iran. Lutzky signifi- cantly called attention to what lie dcscrbcii as a great struggle of colonial peoples from the Pacil'ii- lei the Atlantic "t" rnlnM- in I regimes" and attain indi'jn-nd encc. This is as closi- as .Soviet writers have cared to mmr so far in aim- ing their splits dilci'llv at Midi.) They have tvnvd to .--hniit ;i! Ihe pc.iiphrry. whi'-h A; gll.'inistail In Indl.i Ir.n, and the Arab slati-s. Indi.i lias oltcn 'oct-n ciillrd tile j cornerstone of fsc citipirc. reference is tu its wealth, r'-oa- omic possibilities, and strategic j position the Middle K'isi and the Orient. This siih-contincnt has a population of sonic 000. nearly three times that i.f Hit- United Stales, mid domiimlcs tbt' Indian ocean nil the British route to Australia. Malaya, the Kant Indies anil China. Cmirrrn IN Kvidi-nl Britain's concern over the possi- bility of losing India, not. so much as a possession but finally as even a member of the Driti.-.li Common- wealth of Nations, has become (Coiitimted on Page -1) rilOENIX, Ariz.. March 21 today bey an pri-wenl- ing evidence to .support County Attorney Edward Deancha nip's opening statement in which he a-ske.il a jury of eight wunien and four men to im.pn.se the deatli sentence upon Norman Adams for the knife-.slaying of his wife. An array of witnesses was on hand to irh'e testimony which the prosecutor told the jury would prove premeditated murder of ;t7- year-old Mrs. A.nna Py.st.-r Ad- ams. Tin; attractive ma iron had married Adams last 27 and a month later on used his a r rest on a charge that lie brutally as- u! ted her on Christmas Day. lii'fiirc thr arrest Adams purchfis- e'i a revolver and threatened his wife with death. r.eam-hamp said. Daughter Kinds J'.mly Ii was than a month afli-r assault that the UilliiTj; oc- on .Ian. and the hasis state's casi1 was estab- the curred for t h lished uhi.-n Leda Py- ser. ;i "T the slain man. was calK-il the stand tu lell nf ilsi: of her niiiihi-r's bntly, bearing evii it-are of bealiiiii and ;t si-ri'-.s linifr in Britain Opposes Soviet Request For Delay LONDON, March 21 British government today opposed request by Russia for a 16-day postponement until April 10 of the United Nations Security Council meeting scheduled to op- en Monday in New York. A foreign office spokesman said there was "no inclination on the part ol His Majesty's Government to support the Russian request" for the Council postponement. "We have bad a note in the Kremlin for three weeks about the Russian treaty violation." the spokesivum said, "and it is our view that this is a mailer ot ex- treme urgency on which no post- ponement is advisable." The reference -was to a LJritish Hole to Moscow on the Soviet re- tention ot Iroops in Iran heyon'! M.nrch 2. the dale fixed by treaty fnr withdrawal of all foreign from that country. Plan Final Rites For Ike Proebstel Saturday, 2 P.M. Kmory Elmer (Ike) Proebstel, 77, rancher in the WelHon district for the past -I." years, died at 2 a. ni. today in the Ynma General hu.spilal, it was announced at the O. C. Johnson mortuary. Ho had been ill for some time and entered the hospital three months ago. The local Elks lodge will be in charge of services at the Johnson chapel Saturday at 2 p. m. Local USES Office Places 81 In Jobs During February I'la cements in employment of wiH-licrs who applied at the local offices ot" Lhc United Stales Employment Service in in tiie month February mnnbereJ In the previous month of .lamiaiy Mich plan-men Is tola led ('MMsideHii'4 thai February is a .-jhiir; month with I'nur fewer worU- inLT iiavs than January, tht'.sc U. S. BALKS AT RED MOVE FOR DELAY Believe Russia's Plea Is Doomed To Failure HY It. U. SIIACKKOHH United I'n-sK Staff Correspondent WASHINGTON. Mar. President Truman emphasized to- day that the UNO Security Coun- cil will meet on Monday as sched- uled despite a. Russian request Tor postponement. Mr. Truman was questioned at his news conference about the So- viet request for a 16-day post- ponement. The Soviet government mndo the point that the Iranian com- plaint to the Security Council against Russia was "unexpected" and consequently Russia needed time to prepare to answer the, charges. Mr. Trumnn was asked whether this government favored post- ponement. The president answered: with a flat no, adding emphatically that Ihe Security Council meeting would not be postponed. Will Seek Action He further affirmed Ihal lha United States will press for ac- tion on any disagreement pending before the Council. Asked about the prospects for another meeting of Ihe Big- Three, Ihe president said with some obvi- ous feeling that the UNO was supposed to take over things which would be discussed in Big Three meetings. Mr. Truman added that he thought the UNO should take this responsibility if it wanted to pre- serve world peace. The president reiterated his wil- lingness to see the Big Three leaders whenever they wanted to see him. but he stressed that ha was no.t seeking a. Big Three meeting nor were there any plant; for such a conference. Several important members of Congress recently have urged that another Big Three meeting be held, with tile idea of speeding a solution of major differences among the United States, Britain and Russia, A reporter wanted to know what was likely to happen when the Council meeting begins in New- York Monday if Russia insisUi on a postponement and the United States insists that the meeting begin. Wait and Sec Mr. Truman advised the ques- tioner to attend the meecting and find out. Mr. Truman dismissed reports of disablement on the Anglo- American committee to investigate conditions in Palestine. Asked about these reports, par- ticularly that BarUett Cruni. one of the American members, had attempted to resign but. had been persuaded by the president to stay, (Continued on I'age 3 YUMANS SERVED (ABOARD FAMOUS ln 'laily average of place- _ _ j t H I fit1 O .1 ft 'U (JliU U- SpHTPIItP i l7-'- ;is JCSSSCilLC VftGjfCU i HN, of I By MacArthur .lannai y In the Yllll'a local office, ......filing i u I leriiei'L 'omior. man- in binary and in .l.ir.ii.irv. P..V CAI.I'll TM.VISOKTll I I'liili'il I'rcss Stall j TMKYl i. M.ir. h "1 j M.i.-A rlbnr I...lav i.T-ler-1 ...i Aiin-i .'..pia.'.....h-; Arizona Scientist For Par? In hi.i r, AtOfil Bomb TcSfS for U'.i- I'.at.i.m dcall. ii'.iivh .u.'I ntlur w.irlin..1 Ai.imos. X. M.. March ilics ,jp. 'Hie army announced se- confirm, d the .ah l.-.-ium nf Uese'm. of Hi" on ihr rniversily of as mif t'l lloiiiiu.i bv .1 military i-nui'. jiin- .scientKii.-. '.vbo will iicl ;is The .lapam-.-ii' bn.i m I ur-; leaders in the army-navy Ihcr appeal. i lio.nh tests at Klkllli Atoll "If tln.s lii'l'iTiil-int not iir-j .M Soutlt t'.irit'ii1 during May serve t his late, r.oin- in an.l .Innf. iunal histor1.- evr di'.l." MacArthur said decision. I STtH'S lir.HK MacArthur directed l.t. On. j Malhcws. former Ynma W. IX Stycr. V. s. ci.mm.indcr in attorney and later a rcsidcnl of Ihe Pliiiippines. to the I I'hueiiix, stopped to visit friends lli'.i'i.-ia with a Ynma NVednesd.'iy en route firing squad. The aimoiinccment I from Los Angeles to Phoenix. He CARRIER ESSEX A piililimtion received hure re- l.itoy the outstanding war record of the aimer 1-. 3- S. Essex, on which three local boys served ilur- iniC the war. The three Yumans who .vere with the Ksscx during hi'r Parifie are 1st Cl.t.-s I'.ii Connm- ami Albert. I' .lint l.t. Hr.-.vard Gr-cn. naval air piM v.-Ju. killed in a crash the carrier. In two the Bssex in tjs k'omb.'tt upeiations, .support- ing ovt-ry iuajor Pan fir niciil TaiFiwa to Tokyo HMV, fought through '157 noso jiir rauis ami wjts hit only inirr. when a Kamikaze stiurk iiei. antiaircraft crews U'Hvn -l'i planes and her air groups ilfslmvcil with moiv pnib.ibles. Tonnage .sunk to- (Continued on Pago -1) has resided in the const city for the past two years. Cooties to Meet 'Friday, VFW Club A special meeting of 1'np Tent. Xo. Military Order of Ilie Coolie, is umioiuitv.l tin" l''riday night. Mill. at S p. m. in tile V. V. W. clubhouse on Prisnn Hill. All members are requested Id bring a new member with them, and all veterans who hnve appicii, (ion cards arc asked to be present for Initiation, Kct'ri.'shmcnts will bo served.   

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