Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: November 20, 1945 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - November 20, 1945, Yuma, Arizona                             THE WEATIIKR AT VOMA As .reported by V. S. Wtattlier Burwiu last 21 hours..................16 Lowest last 21 hours..................44 Average high this date..............75 Average lo wthis date................47 Relative humidity at 11 AND TINEL WIATHER FORECAST TO WEDNESDAY NIGHT Mostly fair with temperatures about the same. VOLUME 272 YUMA, ARIZONA TUESDAY, NOVEMBER, 20, 19-15 -THE ARIZONA SENTINEL- VOLUME 272 20 FALLEN NAZI CHIEFS GO ON TRIAL Listen Uneasily To Reading of Indictment Yuma Man's Unit Is Bringing Home Allied Prisoners .lack C. Oillespic. seaman, first rlass. IJSNH, is in hringintf homo IlAMP's (recovered Allieii mililary prisoners) while serving with air irnnsixirt Squad- run 12. of the naval air transport service cnnuuaud. The unit's planes are flown daily over miles of the air routes from Oakland, Calif., to Tokyo. Nearly li.oOO.OOO miles a month are beinic traveled by the fleet of liUK'i: four entitled planes. -Members of the squadron are serving1 in the states, as well a.s such Pacific bases as Honolulu, Guam. Saipan, tlie Philippines, .Johnston IshimJ, Majuro l.sland, Kwujaleiu and others. Co. Board Urged To Ask Priority To Acquire Airfield A. delegation made up of in- terested citizens a.nd city officials met the board of supervisors al Iheir regular meeting Monday and urged tliat the county obtain a priority to acquire the Yuma Army air field when and if it is declared surplus property. It was urged that the board contacl various government agen- Uv l-'HUDKinCK C. OKCUSNKK Press Staff ('iirn'spimdent NUERNBKRG. Nov. 20 (U.PJ Twenty fallen loaders of the Nazi regime on trial before a United Nations tribunal today and listened uneasily to a shocking indictment holding them directly responsible for Ihe death and mis- ery of World War II. The porleutous trial thai for the firsl time in history sought to prove aggressive warfare a crime against all mankind opened in an atmosphere of grim, cold legality in Nuernberg's ancient Palace of .Insticu. 22 On Trial Twenly-two men were on trial, all top figures in Uie Nazi hier- archy lhal overawed Europe for a decade, but two were being; judged in absentia.-the ailing Erusl Kal- lenbnmner and the missing Martin Bormann. Sidney S. Alderman. Washing- Ion, D. C., of the American pros- ecuting staff, began the reading; j cies aml such priority, of the word indictment Enlarge Nuremberg Courtroom for War Trials shortly after the hearings opened ;it W'.O'J a. m. a.m. PS'H. He spoke slowly and deliberately :is he read off the first of the four principal accounts in the in- charging the cused men of plunging the world into war. He was followed to the dais by members of the British, French JUKI Russian prosecution staffs, who intoned the succeeding: pas- fVfter disposing of other routine matters the supervisors and mem- bers of the' delegation loured the air field through the courtesy of the commanding' officer and gain- ed first hand knowledge of the facilities Ihere. At an evening meeting the board decided to cooperate with repre- sentatives of the delegation in making matter. a further Meantime Because thu tiny, tlnry-story courtroom in Nuremberg. Gen unj tried, would scat only 2I> persons, it was remodeled and enlarged Mill K war criminals being sun in photo above, masonry par- titions 'are being torn out and 1-hcams installed to reinforce remaining Willis mid roof of tin- ancient building, which adjoins the larger Palace of Justice, i'ormcr S. S. troopers and German civilians are doing the work, guarded by CH's like the one with gun lit right. The, war crime trials started today. JAVA PORT IS BOMBED BY BRITISH Seek to Clear Path For Advancing Indian Troops EATAVIA, Nov. Brit- ish Thunderbolt fighter-bombers study of the j today bombed Indonesian strong- the clerk of i holds .the board was instructed to write I sages of the "indictment for the benefit of the four presiding jus-1 and malic known ticcs and the jillcry defendants, j the citizens. Under an agreement dated Dec- Dcspite several recesses ol hy the court, the reading pro- gressed more rapidly than had been expected and there was n strong possibility that the accused might enter their pleas before the end of todaj-'s session. The defendants themselves ap- peared to be the most interested men in' the courtroom. They fol- lowed the reading of the indict- men1; witli rapt attention over their earphones attached lo their hench. Hermann Gocring, the number- one defendant, twisted uneasily in his front row seat. From time to time lie leaned over to whisper something to his bcnchmate, Ru- dolph Hess, a.nd occasionally an inane grin twitched across his fat. face. He nodded several times as Al- derman traced thn illegal develop- ment of the German air force under his direction in tiie pre- Munich days when Nazi Germany was secretly arming for war a- gain.si. tho world. to the proper government agencies the desires of ember in-IO. the supervisors granted the federal government permission to use G40 acres, which then comprised a Yuma county field, as an Army air field. The present air field covers the area involved in the agreement and other adjacent land. Most of the runways of the field arc on the CIO acres. Phoenix Plans Memorial to War Dead the Javanese port of Semarang. lo clear a path for Indian troops seeking lo capture the city. Leaflets warning civilians lo take, shelter were showered on the city by an RAF plane. A few min- utes later six Thunderbolts, each carrying a HOO-pound bomb, zoom-j cd down on the strongpoints. Adm. Richardson Testifies F. D. R. Insisted on Fleet Being Kept At Peari Harbor in 1940 WASHINGTON, Although President Roosevelt in- sisted on keeping the U. S. Pacific- fleet jit. Pearl Harbor in liHO as deterrent to Japanese aggression, he did not then want to increase the Navy's personnel. Adm. J. O. Richardson said today. Richardson, commander of the fleet from January. 1910, to Feb- ruary, 1311, told the Pearl Harbor investigating committee in his sec- ond day on the stand that he made a special trip to Washington to find out what this country's mili- tary intentions were. The admiral said it had been an- nounced the fleet was being kept at Pearl Harbor at his request. "As I had made no such re- Entrenched Indonesian troops he testified, "I naturally have-been preventing a linkup of Indian troops deployed -north am.] south of Senianing'. At Soorabayri, further east alon" the north i ua.st of Java, British armi'd troops were reported ad- PHOENIX. Ariz., Nov. 20 A cultural center as a living me- morial to Arizona's war dead will be built in Phoenix soon, it wast ided at n meeting here last I night of -100 Salt River Valley civic leaders. A two-week campaign will op- en Dec. 10 to raise for construction of a library, art The Russian prosecutors sal i building, community theater and almost within arms' reach of Goer- j outdoor hall large enough to ac- commodate persons. Featured in the plans l Continued on Page To the People of this Community The Victory Loan objective of two billion dollars in Serins K Bond sales is no bigger than yourself because it represent.? you multi- Insure attainment of quotas: First War Loan, pieces; (i. o. separate .E Bonds) Second War Loan, pieces; Third War Loan, pieces; Fourth War boaii, pieces; Fifth War Loan, pieces; Sixth War iKJan. 000 pieces; Seventh War Loan, pieces'. You can readily sec that, every E Bond coal breaks down into millions of Individual bite. The Victory Loan's success or rests on your awareness of the necessity of buying extra bonds to care for the wounded, pay for Uie policing of enemy countries, mustering out of millions of men, and the cleaning up of bills for munitions. THE EDITOR are cololium inscribed with names of those who lost their lives in the war and a hall of heroes bearing names of all Arizonans who serv- ed in the armed forces. 13arry Goldwater, Phoenix mer- chant. and World War II veler- an. was chosen as chairman uf Iho fund-raising drive. He called for enlislmcnl of .'JOO men and "00 women for the campaign! Europeans trapped by Hie 11-day balllc in the city. They were said to be moving outward from the ruined city's center loward the residential quarter of Darmo. 1'reparatinns Hasty preparations were being' made to protect Batavia against an anticipated extremist attack which, some officials feared, might subject the city lo Ihe same fate as Socrabaja. A defensive perimeler will lie eslablishcd around Batavia by members of the T.K.R.. Indonesian "Peace Preservation Corps." ac- cording k) an announcement, by Amir Sjarifiidin, information min- ister in the "Indonesian Republi- can ca.hinct." quoted hy the Anela News Agency. Dutch airmen just returned from Socrabaja reported that Indones- ian troops, inspired hy Moslem religious fervor, have been throw- ing themselves witii heedless fren- zy against British tanks. The air- l Continued on Page fj) S. West Coast and increases in Navy personnel. But the president held to his convictions about holding the fleet al the advanced base and did not approve Richardson's request for more men. "The president was rather loath to increase the number ot men be- cause he felt that the mechanics could be quickly inducted if their services were Richard- son testified, That was in July. 10-10. Selective Service did not go into effect until October, 19-10. Mission Kvjilaincd Richardson testified thai hi.s mission on July S primarily was to determine why Mr. Roosevelt wanted the fleet retained at Ha- waii and to stress the need for increasing the number of men in the Navy. "We. were building a large Na- he said. "We had on board only about S3 per cent of the nor- complement. I wanted the keep it at Pearl Har-1 ships manned fully and the men trained so that we would be pre- pared cither lor peace or for war." Richardson said Mr. Roosevelt felt in connection with naval man- power "that men with technical abilities in civil life could be la- CHIANG ASKS RUSSAIDIN MANCHURIA Army Paper Hints Move Has Changed The Situation Hy (JKOKliK L'niU'l! I'n-ss Stuff Correspondent CHUNOKING, Nov. (U.R) Oencralissimo Chiang Kai-Shek hns appealed again to Russia for cooperation in restoring- Sovict- oceupied Manchuria to the Chinese Central Government, it was dis- closed today. The official Central Army news- paper Ta Kung Pao said Chiang's new representations were made by the Chinese ambassador in Mos- cow and that similar conferences had been held with the Soviet en- voy ia Chungking. The newspaper intimated strong- ly that the negotiations had work- ed out, satisfactorily for the Cen- tral Government, which had been sharply critical of Moscow's al- leged "passive intervention" on the side of the Chinese Commun- ists in Manchuria. Ta. Rung- Pao said the general- issimo's son, Ching Chin-Kuo, and the other Chungking representa- tives who were forced to flee the Manchnrian capital of Changchun several days ago to escape capture by the Communists were prepar- ing to return "very soon." There was no further elabora- tion of the reported Sino-Russian conferences, but the army organ said they had resulted in a "com- plete turnabout" of the Manchur- ian situation. But that account of improved Russian-Chinese relations differed sharply with a dispatch published by. the Central Kuomintang's of- ficial newspaper, Chung Yang Jih Pao. The Kuomintang paper, in an Cpl. C. H. McGowcm Gets Discharge, Re-enlists Cpl. Clifford H. McGowan, 28, of Yuma. who received his Army discharge at Camp Calif., Nov. 12 has since re-enlisted ajiil requested service in the European Theater of Operations, his mother. Mrs. W. L. Chadwick. of 062 Or- ange avenue, announced this week. McGowan, who was inducted Aug. 10, served as .1 machine gunner in 341 infantry unit in the Ardennes battle and the Central European campaign. He was wounded in both legs by shrapnel in the Ardennes battle and was captured by the Dei-man army on -Dec. 16. He was rescued by U. S. forces from a German prison camp April 2. 10-15. 'He lias been awarded the Silver Star, Purple Heart and Good Con- duct medals, the American Thea- ter ribbon and the European Thea- ter ribbon with three bronze stars, ajid a Presidential Citation.. Defense Motion AtYamashita Trial Is Denied MANILA. Nov. 20 United Slates military commis- wanted to find out what was back of it." The committee hoped to learn whether Mr. Roosevelt relieved Richardson from mand because h llu: fiecl com- would not en- (Continued on Page 5) AUTO WORKERS AWAIT REPLY FROMG-M of 3.00H dorse the chief executive's deter- mai minalion to nor. Jtclicved of Command Kichardson was relieved of UK command Feb. .1. He told t.lu committee yesterday he vigorous- ly opposed the late president's or- der to concentrate the fleet in Ha- waiian waters where, the admiral fell, it could not be properly de- fended or prepared for belligerent action. .Richardson told the committee] former Undersecretary of State he called on .Mr. Roosevelt at the ken and quickly trained." The admiral said he stayed in Washington until July H. During Ills visit he Secretary of talked with former State; Cordell Hull. White House on July S, HMO. and again on Oct. S. IfllO. He said he urged return of the fleet to tiie U. Simmer Welles. Son. James F. Byr- nes, now secretary of state, and Gen. George C. Marshall, Army I Continued on Page 5) DOG WHICH DIED HERE FOUND TO HAVE BEEN RABID An examination of the heflcl of a dog sent to tho state, labora- tories at. Phoenix last Friday dis- closed that thu dog rabid, Dr. R. R. Knotls, county health unit physician disclosed today. The dog was taken last wr.el; in tho vicinity of 1st street nnd 18th avenue after it had bitten sev- eral persons. The animal also snapped at Dr. K. C. JlcCord while he was examining it. A quarantine has been placed on the entire aren west, of the east, main canal between lird street and the. Colorado ricvr. Dr. Knotls has ordered all in that area lo bo tied up and observed for two weeks as a prec'Uitionnry measure. Probe Death of Joe Conway, Killed n Aofo Crash Hear Apaclie Junction DKTKO1T, (ieneral Motors corporation to- day rejected u demand front (he- pciHc.rful CfO United Auto for an inimeiliat. an- to the unions proposal thai its 30 per cent wage de- mands he. submitted to arbitra- tion. Though the strike imperiled corporation had previously .prom- ised un answer before the 4 p. m. deadline set by the nniun, H. W. Anderson, (J-M vice president, said the corporation's answer would he delivered "on or before Friday, November :iH." ion trying Gen. Tomoyuki Ya- masliitu for war crimes in the Philippines denied a defense, mo- tion for acquittal today and re- fused a subsequent request for more time to prepare his case. The five-man tribunal, how- ever, granted a 20-hbm- recess un- til a.m. tomorrow. Motion Presented The motion for acquittal was presented hy chief of the defense counsel, 1..1. Harry E. Clarke of Altoona, Pa.., after the prosecu- tion rested its 123-count case against this morning. "The defense asks the commis- sion for a verdict of not guilty on the grounds that the accused is innocent of the charges placed against him in this Clarke said. "In no instance has the pros- ecution presented any direct evi- dence to establish allegations contained in the charge that he unlawfully disregarded and failed to discharge his duties as com- E.L ALLEN IS CHARGED WITH MURDER Following Inquest Into Death of His Stepson A coroner's jury Monday after- noon round that Joe Gordon Wil- banks came to his death Novem- ber 15 as a result of a gunshot wound inflicted by his stepfather, Edward L. Allen. Young Wilbanks, 15, died in the Ynma General hos- pital last Thursday, nearly foui1 hours after Allen allegedly shot him at the ranch home on llth street. Allen was not present at Uie inquest but was represented by his attorney, Peter C. Byrne. The jury deliberated less than ten minutes, after, hearing ev- idence of members of the Allen family who were present at' the time the shooting, took place in the Allen home on llth street on the morning of November 15. First witness to testify was Allen's wife, mother of the WU- tanlcs boy by a. former marriage. She. told of accompanying Allen :o Yuma early on the morning oi ;he tragedy for having her car Arir... Nuv. 20 i cd badly and the steering wheel inquest was being held here j was broken. Couway apparently died of internal injuries. Brought here following the accident. Cnn- Phillip A. Nelson Is Promoted to Sfoff Sergeant way's body will bo taken to Phoe- I I-'Att F.AST AIR SERVICE COMMAND. SOUTHWEST PA- CIFIC Phillip A.' Nelson, hus- band of Mrs. Maxene Nelson. Yuma. has recently been promoted to Staff Sergeant at a troop car- rier base ill the Philippines. After enlisting in October. 10-12, he served as an aircraft, mechanic at Yuma air field until May of this year when he fame overseas. is now a member of Ihe S74Ui Troop Carrier group, ocdcsl Iroop carrier unit in the Sonlhwesl Pa- cific. Tin.1 oT-tlh, holder of three presidential unit cilatioiiK, has par- ticlpalcd in every major campaign from New Guinea to Okinawa, car- rying men and supplies to the front lines in unarmed transports. Nelson is entitled to wear the Asiatic Pacific Ihcaler ribbon with one bailie star and Uie Phil- ippine liberation ribbun. ,1, i today in Ihe death of former At- I torney General Joe Conway. who was injured fatally late yesterday when his car plunged into a dry ruad.side wash .seven miles south- east, of Apache Junction. Conway, who last January end- ed the longest career in history as Arizona's chief law officer follow- ing unsucces.srnl bid for the .Senate! Winkleiuan and seat held by Carl. Haydn found'.still conscious at Uie of hi.s wrecked automobile hv two i I. he studied law at the Uni- 15V UNITED J'RKSS CIO anto workers loday awaited an answer from Genera.l .Motors before calling a system-wide strike which an industry spokesman said might paralyze operations in every major automobile company except j one. Genera] Tuolors. largest and strongest of the anlo indnslry's Big Three, was given until -1 p. m. today to reply lo a Uniled Aulo- mobile Workers (CIO) proposal. This offered submission of wage demands to a three-man arbitra- i lion board. ma nding general of forces alleged to have committed atrocities. "In no instance chas the pros- ecution presented direct evidence that he permitted perpetration of the atrocities alleged. "In fact ,the only evidence pre- sented remotely connecting the accused with knowledge of the alleged atrocities is the testimony of two self-confessed collabora- tors who schemed to save their lives during occupation and who now are trying to earn protection by testifying against the ac- cused." Arguing against the motion. Chief Prosecutor Maj. Robert M. Kerr of. Portland. Ore. Yamashita was guilty declared in every instance and "there can be no doubt as to his guilt.' Vice-President Walter P. Tijuana Police Chief Ousted TIJUANA. Mt-x.. Nov. 20 .Joaquin Aguilur Rubles, chief of the purpose -oE repaired. Alien had become irritated because the caused him to be late to work at a welding shop in Yuma. where he was employed. Kufiiscs Kiss The ensuing argument ended when the couple arrived at the ranch home at about S a.m. Mrs. Allen said that as she got out the car, Allen had asked her to kiss him goodbye and she had told him she did not feel like it. "Well you had -better bid Joe ;oodbye she said her. hus- band had stated. With that Allen went into the louse and obtained a .32 pistol from the drawer of a table in his bedroom. She tried to wrest the un from him, she said, but he brushed past her and dashed to :he bedroom where Joe was gct- :ing ready for school. She heard i shot and saw the boy fall to the floor, she testified. Asked if there had been any words between Allen and the hoy before the shooting, Mrs. Allen answered that there had not. Shortly after Uie shodling oc- curred, Mrs. Allen said, her hus- band went to the kitchen and fired a shot at his own head hut he inflicted only a slight wound. In the excitement Uiat followed she could not recall clearly the details of wiiat happened except that calls had been made for a doctor and for an ambulance. When the ambulance arrived the lad was taken to the Yuma Gen- eral hospital where he died short- ly before noon. Dr. Wayne A. Fenderson, whom Mrs. Allen had called to treat- thu boy, teslified as to the cause 'of death and thu circumstances sur- rounding his visit to the Allen home shorlly after the shooting. He said thai Ihe boy's death was due to uncontrollable hemorrages from a head wound apparently (Continued on Page jij WRITER TO VISIT YUMA SEEKING FEATURE STORIES police here since Ifl-M, today was nix for burial. Bora in Tlali Horn Joseph Ward Conway al iiculher warned that the machin-i! Salt Lake City, Utah. Dec. ISMS. CM'.V WHS set. up for an immedial' .suspended from office by Gov. the attorney was known exclusive-! strifcn among; G-M em- ly as "Joe." Ho was reared should the company answer in 101S Tempe Stale College. After be unsatisfactory. Almost simultaneously with tho l morn who wiieel serving in the Army during World s ultimatum. C.corge Rom- j Lujs of the Automobile soldiers, bill he died a lew minutes after asking for a drink of wa- ter. Ihe soldiers qnoU-d Conway as saying "1 don't know what hap- pened" when they asked for de- tails of the accident. Car Leaves Iload An imvslgation hy Hi Highway Patrol disclose Conway's car left, the 1 State that of Arizona, -radimting in Conway lived al Phoenix .since) opening a law practice there in mat. He first was elected attorney general in taking office in I January, ISi.'iT, and serving coniin- uously until lasl January. Although he forsook that office to run for the U. S. Senate, Con- way had announced his intention hway oi' trying again for the attorney Manufacturers' association, said lhal n strike General Mo-1 tors would be followed within a j week by shutdowns in plants of all bin one other major automobile manufacturer. It was assumed thai the 1111- j named manufacturer was the Ford '.Motor Co.. traditionally an inde- pendent. Phone Workers Strike In other labor disputes, the Juan Felipe Rico on charges made against him by Manuel Fontes. i inspector of police for the North- ern District, it was reported. Tiie charges, which were not I made public, will be iiivestigaled according to Mayor Silvcrio I. Ro- i mero who transported Rico's or- Arguello. undcrshieff j of police, has been appointed act- about. 6f. feet north of the wash as i generalship at no he was lo Phoenix, from "voice with a smile" was stilled court Irial at. Klorence knocked over a guard po. down a seven-foot Tin? front of the and plunged mbankment. tar was smash- Conway is survived by his wid- ow, Mrs. Gertrude Oonway, and n daughler and son-in-law, Capl and by a telephone strike in the com- pany's Windsor, Out., plant. In all, strikes kept HllO.iiOO U. .S. workers away Jobs. according to a United Press count. (Continued on Page 6) uilar, who said he will seek an audience with Rico tomorrow, was appointed to the office by Rico in August, 19-1-1. He was one of Rico's first appointees on i becoming governor. Car Pilfered Lieiileimnt Mitchell of the Del Sol hotel reported to the sheriff's office t.his morning that a barrack's hag containing: blankets and per- sonal belongings of himself and his daughter had been taken from hi.s car. A trench coat also was miss- ing, he said. Dighton. former Phoenix newspaperman and now a staff writer in the Los Angeles bureau of the Associated Press, accom- panied by a Wide World photo- grapher will visit. Vnma on Dec- ember -tth. il was announced today by U. I... Baker. President of the Yuma County Chamber of Com- merce. The two men are visiting Ari- zona in search of feature story material tor by member pa- pers of the Associated Ja'.r.e.s .loyner. chairman of the chamber publicity coinmillce. is making arrangemeiils lo accom- pany llie.-se men on a tour through the Yuma districts. STORES TO BE CLOSE THURSDAY. THANKSGIVING Thanksgiving nay 'ri'cd In Arixoiui public, will be: Thlirnday, Ynma storeil will be closed mi that day, it wsui announced at. tho chamber of commerce.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication