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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: April 16, 1945 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - April 16, 1945, Yuma, Arizona                             THE WEATHER AT TOXA As reported by V. S. Weather Bureau Highest last 24 hours..................80 Lowest last 21 hours..................51 Average high this date....._...........80 Average low this date..................55 AND TH TINIL WEATHER FORECAST TO TUESDAY NIGHT Pair and Wanner VOLUME 90 YUMA. ARIZONA MONDAY, APRIL 16, 1945 THE ARIZONA SENTINEL- VOLUME 90 U.S. FORCES ROLL ON UNCHECKED TOWARD MEETING WITH RUSSIANS By BOYI) LEWIS United Press. War Correspondent PARIS. April German resistance stalled the S. Ninth army along the Elbe riv- er -15 to 50 miles from Berlin to- day, but other American forces rolled unchecked toward a junct- ure with the Red army. One col- lunc was reported astride the Ger- man-Czechoslovak border. With the thunder of battle al- ready rolling back over their wrecked capital, the Nazis turned to fight for their last-ditch line a- long the Elbe with a desperate fanaticism. They hurled the American Sec- ond Armored division back-across the Elbe just north of Madgcburg CO miles southwest of Berlin, and opened a' heavy artillery bombard-: ment on the Ninth army's other 'bridgehead at Barby, 15 miles to the southeast. Bridgehead Established But the army bridgehead won by the 83rd Infantry division Sat- urday, was reported firmly estab- lished and expanding steadily in spite of faking enemy shellfire that time .and again wrecked the American pontoon bridges. Veteran tank crews of the Sec- ond Armored division, driven from their own bridgehead late Satur- day after 48 hours of fighting, bounced back across 'the Elbe thn the SSrd's salient and pbined the doughboy attack. The .combined divisions slugged their way forward four miles or more to positions about 50 miles southwest of Berlin. Two more Ninth Army divisions, the Fifth Armored and 30th In- fantry rammed up to.-.thi' Elbe riv- er along a front of more than 50 miles north of Madgeburg and de- ployed for a crossing at points as close as 45 miles from Berlin. SlandlSbiiig The fierce German stand .be- fore Berlin, however, was being nullified swiftly by'the overwhel- ming, sweep of the American First and Third armies, advancing into custom Germany along a twisting SOO.milc front; American First Army troops were little more than SO miles from a .juncture with the Soviet divisions massed on the Neisse river. They reached the Mnlde river just south of Dessau, only ia miles from the Ninth army bridgehead at Barby, capturing the biggest Junkers aircraft plant.in the Reich. Their armor and infantry storm- ed in Halle, 25 miles farther south, and entered the western outskirts of Germany's greatest remaining military base. Lt. Genl George S. Patton's American Third army outflanked Leipzig with a mile-an-hour arm- ored drive that all but enveloped the big textile and communica- tions center of Chemnitz, 38 miles to the southwest. Keport Unconfirmed A sensational but wholly uncon- firmed report relayed by the' Nazi controlled Scandinavian Telegraph Bureau in Stockholm said Patton's tanks had crashed on 3-1 miles be- y'ond Chemnitz to peach Dresden. 53 miles from the Red Army lines on the Neiss. An equally unsubstantiated Brus- sels Radio report said Third Ar- my troops also had broken across the Czechoslovak border at an un- disclosed point south of Chemnitz, perhaps 70 miles from Prague. Lntest official information from Temperatures PHOENIX. Ariz., April 10 (U.R! weather bureau today re- ported the following temperatures for the last 2-1 hours: High Low Chicago 46 42 Denver 30 29 Kansas City 62 46 Los Angeles 72 49 Minneapolis 45 34 New York 57 .19 Phoenix 71 43 St. Louis 60 55 San Francisco 71 45 Tucson 04 43 Yuma 80 52 the Third Army front placed Pat- ton's vanguards in Hof, 51 miles southwest of Chemnitz and_eight frontier. Another column 5 miles to the south reached the Schwar- zenbach area, seven miles from the border. NAZIS SAY RED ATTACK LAUNCHED Report Russians Have Penetrated Berlin Defense Line Baby Son Is Born to Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Simon April 9th Mr, nml Mrs. C. W. Simon nf the lower valley are announcing the birth of a bnby son nt the Yuma General hospital on Mon- April 9. The baby has been named Clif- ford Edward. There la another child in the homo, Charles, Jr., seven years old. By TCOBEUT. MUSKL United .Press Staff, Correspondent LONDON, The Red army attacked on a 110 mile front east of Berlin today in a general offensive to capture the devastated Nazi capital and link up with Allied 'armies in the west. In the first few hours of the long-expected assault, the Nazis conceded, the Russians penetrated the last-ditch Nazi defense line be- tween Kuestrin and Frankfurt due east of Berlin and seized a new bridgehead across the Oder mid- way between the capital and Stet- tin. The Soviet high command did not confirm the offensive immedi- ately, but the first to announce such major So- viet no doubt that tin supreme push from the .cast had begun. Attack at A. M. Marshal K. Zhuhov.'s First White Russian army threw the main weight .of its all-out of- fensive against .the German line from Wriezen, 23 miles northeast of Berlin, to Fuerstenberg, 42 miles southeast, at a.m. under cover of a terrific air and artillery bom- bardment. "Grim fighting" developed on Berlin's frontal defenses, Nazi ac- counts said -and Soviet forces wed- ged, into the' line in at least one point. Eighty miles to the west, American-forces also.were driving toward Berlin. Nazis Have Divisions .With the attack, the Russians engaged, the last sizeable organir zed portion of the German army still.fighting in the Reich. Allied observers believed as many as' 90 German men had been waiting on the eastern approaches to Berlin for the So- viet offensive. The Russians already had hurd- led their biggest obstacle on the eastern approaches to Berlin -the Oder river. They held as many as six bridgeheads across the -15-mile stretch of the river from which the German's said today's offensive was launched. The biggest was opposite Kues- trin, 38 miles east of Berlin, on the direct super-highway and trunk railway from Warsaw. Kuestrin was captured by the Rus- sians more than a month ago. Attack Area Described Ernest von Hammer, commenta- tor for the official Nazi DNB ag- ency, said the Soviets attacked a- long the Oder River front from a point north of Kuestrin, 38 miles tail of Berlin, to one south of Frankfurt. 33 miles east. Other Nazi broadcasts indicated the offensive got under way be- tween Wriczcn, 23' miles northeast of Berlin and 22 miles northwest of and Fucrstenbcrg. -12 miles southeast of Berlin and 15 miles south of Frankfurt. "According to reports so far Hammer said, "the So- viets were-hailed by violent Ger- man barrage fire in all sectors with the exception of one Soviet local penetration." Simultaneous with the main push, Hammer said, other Soviet troops this morning began "major attacks" in the Forst area 60 miles southeast of Berlin, 14 miles east of the junction city of Colt- bus and 90 miles from American First Army spearheads. In Upper Slle.sin Still another Soviet attack open- ed yesterday in upper Silesia, he reported. Seven rifle divisions, pos- sibly men, and numerous tank forces hit the German lines southeast and southwest of Rati- bor in an assault apparently aimed at the Czechoslovak industrial city of Moravska Ostrava; gateway to the Moravian he said. First reports showed 30 Soviet tnnlta knocked out of action, Hum- mer anld, Hitchhikes Miles to See Dad; Both In Seabees When a young American wants something bad enough lie gener- ally finds a way to get it.1 It must have, been 'the Ameri- can ingenuity in S 2-c Everett 13. Hall, Jr., that made him find a way to 'travel from his Philippine base to see his dad, COM Everett B. Hall, sr., who is based 2000 rhiles away in the Marianas. Junior limbered up his hitch- hiking thumb and was able to climb aboard planes at various points and land at bis dad's base and walk in to surprise him on April 7. One of the first things they did on 'their reunion was to sit down and write home to the "rest of the family" which con- sists of Mrs. Hall who lives at 5-10 Seventh avenue in Yuma. Both father ana son are in the Seabees. The father is a veteran of two years service, 15 months of which'have been overseas. Jun- ior has 20 months to his credit with 13 months overseas. The father's unit recently re- ceived the Presidential citation for work done in the landing on Saipan.. ALLIES OPEN ITALY FRONT OFFENSIVE Fifth and Eighth Armies Advance; Air Force Aids By WALTER COLLINS Unitrd Tress Staff Correspondent ROME. April -The. U. S. Fifth army opened a crashing attack in the Italian mountains below- Bologna today .and Gen. Mark W. that the Allied 15th Army's group's gener- spring; offensive -now- -is them you have got. and with God's help we will have a decisive and perhaps final Clark said in an order of the day. The whole Italian front a- blaze. British .Eighth Army forces were beating back the Adriatic wing of the German ar- my troops were striking along the approaches of Bologna and to the west were slugging up the Ligur- ian coast towai'd La Spczia and its great naval base. Communique 'is' Issued Clark, commander of ail Allied Forces in Italy, issued the follow- ing special communique: "The spring offensive in the Mediterranean theater has begun. The. Fifth army started its offen- sive this morning, joining the large scale effort begun a week ago by the British Eighth army. The Fifth Army attack was preceded by an ail-out air bombardment in the mountainous area south of Bolog- na Sunday afternoon." U. S. loth air force eclipsed all its previous record in .the at- tack preliminary to the new of- fensive. It sent heavy bomb- ers to drop tons of bombs on tactical targets south of Bolog- na. The Fifth Army drive was 'along side the left wing of the Eighth army which attacked hist week. Polish units of the Eighth scored tile biggest victory of the cam- paign by capturing Imola, strateg- ic transport center on the trunk railway 22 miles southeast of Bo- logna. The Germans were fighting dog- gedly everywhere on the Italian front. Authorities said there was no sign that they intended to give up an inch of Italian soil. Body of Late President is Buried In Rose Garden at Hyde Park By MEKK1MAN SMITH United Press Staff Correspondent HYDE PARK. N. Y., April 16. body of Franklin Del- ano Roosevelt rested today in the soil of a sunny rose garden on the family estate overlooking the Hud- son river. A few minutes before 10 o'clock yesterday morning, a lone gun in a nearby field stilled those wait- ing in the hedge-locked garden .with the first round of a 21-gun presidential salute. Forty-seven minutes later the simple services for the 31st president of the Unit- ed States were over. As the echo of the gun faded, the strains of "Hail to the Chief" played by the West Point: cadet band came through the nearby woods. The funeral procession moved up the hillside, paced by the muffled drums. Hand Leads First came the band, then GOO West Point cadets. The president's flag-draped casket rested on 'a black caisson drawn by six brown horses. Behind it was Mrs. Roose- velt and her family. President Harry S. 'Truman and his wife and daughter. Inside the garden the widow of the .late president's half brother, Mrs. James R. Roosevelt, waited in a chair beside .the graveside. At her side was Fala, the presi- dent's dog. Planes flew across the proces- sion, low on a -straight course.' A.drum began a dirge. Three beats and a slow roll, three slow roll, three beats, slow endlessly. Funeral March is Played As the procession neared the garden the band took up Chopin's Funeral March. In an undertone the drums kept the rhythm. The band played the Star Span- gled Banncr.-thcn-the hyrpn-rhos- en by Mrs. Roosevelt, "Nearer My God to Thee." At a.m. the caisson was drawn into position. Eight enlist- ed men from the armed there were no honorary pallbear- the casket to the grave. Behind the 76-year-old Rev. W. George Anthony, stood Mrs. Roose- velt with a son, Brig. Gen. Elliott Roosevelt, on one side, and her daughter, Mrs. Anna-Boettiger, on the other. Behind her stood her four daugh- ters-in-law and her son-in-law, Col. John Boettiger. President Next Behind them was another fam- nation's official family, President Harry S. Truman, his assistants and heads of the.armed forces. Dr. Anthony, wearing the black cassock, white surplice and black skull cap of: the Episcopal church, began his prayer. "All that the Father givcth me shall come to intoned, be- ginning-the Episcopal committal. "Unto Almighty the Rev. Anthony began. A bomber overhead swung, low, dipped in salute and almost drown- (Continued on Page 4) WASHINGTON, April 1C. (U.R) Eleven Superfortresses are missing from today's SOO to 'raid oil Tokyo, tho- war department WASHINGTON, April ifi President Truman con f greed for 20 mm'nfiss tish Foreign Minister. Ardlioii.y Eden .delivered ver-. messages from Prime Min- ister Winston Churchill. Hitler Orders Troops Hold on Eastern Front LONDON. April 1C (U.ra---Adolf rlitler, from his headquarters on thc Eastern Front, today issued a special order of thc day declar- ing that the Red Army has launched an offensive "which must and will be bled while before the capital." The DNE news agency said the order was directed to the German .roops of the East front and said :hat thc Red army "for thc last :ime" had launched a mass of- 'cnsive. Hitler declared that any Ger- nnn soldier who did not fulfill lis duty was a traitor. "Thc regiment or division which relinquishes Its said the order, "will be shamed by the wo- men and children who arc brav- ing thc bombing terror." With U. h. nuvrinrn' Army in April 10 (U.R) The American Seve.nth army c.ap.- tured Laiif six miles northeast of Nuernhorg and closed on thc Nazi shrihc city from llircn sides today. With U. S. Ninth Army, Gr.r- nuuiy, April Hi Ninth army liberated Allied prisoners of war, includ- ing 680 Americans, in its three week advance from the Kliitie. tn the Elbe river, it-was. "dis- closed today. PATHS, April iran forces brought the ancient German strongholds of Liepzig and Nuernberg under siege fire today and, according to "Nazi reports, prepared to launch a vast new crossing of the Elbe on a 25-mile front directly west of Berlin. TAKIS, April 10 vanguards nf the American and JJussian armies made their first contact above, thc Leipzig-Dres- den corridor today, harely 4ft miles ahead nf two great Unitrd Stalr.s lank armies plowing through the shattered defenses of central Germany. LONDON, April 1C More than A m o r i r a n bombers and fighters attacked German strong points today along the Giromlc estuary, where, the Freneli were trying td open tlie gateway to Rur- deauv, and transport targets in the Ivt-gciihlnirg area. LONDON, April 10 unconfirmed French report said today that Gi'-stapo Chief Hein- rieli Himmler had thwarted a new Grnnan army pint to over- throw Adolf Ililler and sue for prai-e. Tim report, of doubtful auth- enticity, came in the midst of fevrrish speculation that major" developments ran In: expected mi thc military and diplomatic fronts before Vrlmc Minister Churchill addresses Commons Thursday. Rumors were circulating in Stockholm that Germany's cap- itulation could he. expected to- day, "probably this afternoon." With U. S. first Army in Germany, April more- German generals captured by American troops in the lliilir today, and It was be- Heved that the lop-ranking lender. Field Marshal Walter vnu Model, was .still trapped in tin: pocket with about soldiers YANKS CLOSE IN ON JAPS ATBAGUIO Philippines-Based Planes Canton, Hong Kong IJ.V UON CASWELL United Press War Correspondent MANILA, April Three American columns closed in today Baguio, last major eneniy-neld city on Luzon, with one force on- ly three miles away. The columns- were, approaching the city, former Japanese head- quarters in the Philippines, from the northwest, southwest and Southeast. One force, which piishcd'up from the 'original Limjaycn. invasion beacheads reached within three miles-.-of .tlie southwestern city while a second, '..column through Mpnglo, four miles.north-, west .of Baguio, arid the third con- tingent advanced beyond Lawilan to within 10'miles southeast of the city. In Southern Luzon In southern Luzon, other Amer- ican troops seized Cagraray is- land off the cast const of Albay gulf, where the 158th Regimental Combat Team landed two weeks ago at Legaspi and since have pushed far up the Bicol peninsula. Gen. Douglas MacArthur dis- closed that bombers and fighters, in direct support of the ground forces throughout the Philippines, dropped approximately -100 tons of bombs on Japanese front positions. Davao is Hammered Other aerial forces 'hammered Davao, in southeastern Mindanao. Thursday and Friday, and paral- yzed the city's communications with 3S7 tons of bombs. The at- were carried out by all types of planes from the Far Eastern air force, which flew more than 250 sorties in the two days. Long-range Liberators continu- ed the blockade of China Sea shipping delivered the first Phil- ippines-based blow on the Chinese port of Canton and again hit the battered docks at Hong Kong. Lt. Col. Carl Ekstrand. Lyons. Neb., a veteran of flO missions and deputy commander of the famed "Jolly Roger" group, led the Can- ton force which comprised more than 70 liberators and Lightnings. W. H. Harrison Is Promoted to 1st Lieutenant A Ninth A1 r Force Fighter- Bomber, Base. H. Harrison, 23, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Harrison, 89B Sixth avenue, Yuma, Arizona, a Ninth A i r Force P-47 Thunderboldt pilot, has been promoted to first lieutenant. is a flier with the 'lOGth fighter-bomber group and he has flown more than 30 missions against the ene- my, bombing and strafing Ger- man armor and strong points ahead of Allied armies from Nor- of the Rhine river in Germany. For destroying an enemy armor- ed column which .was menacing a flank o f Lieutenant General George S. Patton'3 Third army during its drive across Prance, Harrison's group has been award- ed the Presidential Unit Citation. Lieutenant Harrison the Air Medal witli five Oak Leaf Clusters. JAP ATTACK REPULSED ON OKINAWA Marines Advance On Northern Part of island Army to Sell Fruit Crates at Field Twelve thousand fruit and veg- etable crates arc being salvaged by thc pos't quartermaster nt. Yunm Air Field. Tlie crates will be sold to cith- er civilians or military personnel. The fruit.cases are priced at nnd the vegetable cases nt 5.00 apiece. Purchases will be made through ;hc central purchasing and con- tracting office on Yunm Army Al'r Field and the crates may Vjc inspected nt the salvage yard any weckf'iiy from a. m. to By FKANK TKEMAJNE United Press War Correspondent GUAM, April of the Third Amphibious corps pushed along the last 10-odd miles toward the northern tip of Okin- awa against light resistancu today In southern Okinawa, army troops of the Zdtli beat off Jap- anese counterattacks arid, by To- kyo, accounts, prepared for a full- scale offensive against .Naha. cap- ital of the island. The army forces have been stall- ed upwardr of Japanese troops en- trenched in defenses built into hills shielding Naha, only a scant four miles soulh-of the American lines. Attacks Smashed American -infantry killed Japanese in-smashing three coun- terattacks yesterday. The enemy troops swarmed down from well defended Kakazu ridge yards inland from tile west coast and iabout yards north of Naha Some of the enemy troops were armed only with spears, but oth- ers carried tommy guns, grenades and explosive charges! A Japanese .communique said the Americans were making "full preparations for an .offensive in southern Okinawa in spite of pow- erful blows sustained under our counteroffensivcs." Some l.Vuu American troops were killed or wounded between last Thursday and Sunday, the communique said. Say Planes Attacking Other Tokyo broadcasts said Japanese planes had launched an- other "large-scale" assault on A- merican task forces and carrier concent-rations nroimj Okinawa at dawn Monday. If confirmed, it would be the third major Japanese attempt to drive off the American fleet sup- porting the Okinawa, campaign. The enemy lost 116 Japanese planes in the first assault April 7 and US more April 12. In the north, the marines were driving toward the northern tip of Okinawa against little or no resistance. However, one isolated enemy group on Motobu peninsula, which juts out of the northwest coast of Okinawa, was putting up a stiff fight. American troops- extended their hold on the Kcrama islands south- west of Okinawa Saturday with a landing on Kcufu, but no details of the invasion were available. PRESIDENT ASSURES U. S. HE WILL SUPPORT AND DEFEND F. D. R.'S IDEALS WASHINGTON. .April 16 President Truman in. his first ap- pearance before the rcongress to- and 'the that he would support and defend the ideals of President Roosevelt "with all my strength and with all my heart. Ho said that in the war "our demand has been, and it remains surrender. "So that there can be no pos- sible misunderstanding, both Ger- many and Japan can be certain, beyond any shadow of doubt, Am- erica will continue the fight for freedom until no vestige of re- sistance remains. Hard ngiii -.HuieaU And, he .are deeply conscious of. the fact .that much hard fighting is .still ahead of us. "Having to pay such a heavy price to make complete victory L'ertain, "America will be- come a party to anyplan for partial victory To settle for merely, another temporary icspite would surely jeopardize the fu turc security of all the world "We will not traffic with, the breakers of the peate on the terms of the peace. He also was emphatic--in say: ing that this country s var strat cgy, conceived under the late president and the chiefs of the armed services appointed by Mr Rooaavelt, '.would not change. "The grand strategy of the Junior C.C. To Elect Directors Tuesday Night Election of 11 directors will feature thc meeting of thc newly formed Yuma Junior Chamber of Commerce at the superior court- room tomorrow night. Secretary William n. Under announced to- day. The 11 will be selected from the following who were nominated at the organization meeting last Fri- day night: Norman Eann. V. C. Krnden, Paul E. Bradford, Ralph F. Brandt. Harold B. Breech. James Birmingham, Robert S. Brov.ssnrd, Peter C. Byrne, K. V. Crowder, Jack H. Fritz, Bob Hodge, F. H. Johnson. Philip I. Kramer, Harry Lcepcr, R. H. (Continued on Hags 3) SUPERFORTS AGAIN BLAST JAPGAPITAL War Plants In Southeast Tokyo Are Bombed Today By 'LISLE-SHOEMAKER United Press'War Correspondent GUAM, April t6 Su- perfortresses burned out- .10 square miles of lokyo Saturdiy the 21st bomber command an- nounced, and anther, .huge air fleet heaped." new destruction on the still-burning capital today. Some 300 'to 400 :B-29s dropped possibly tons of. -high explo- sive and incendiary bombs on .war plants in southeast .Tokyo and at Kawasaki, an industrial suburb of Tokyo, in today's ing raid. Fires raged.. out of. con- trol- for seven and a-half hours, Tokyo broadcasts said. The destruction wrought by the Superfortresses in Saturday's raid included factories contribut- ing to seven major war-making industries, including thc prize .Itabashc arsenal. Otluirs Plants Damaged Also damaged were chemical plants, powder factories and shell plants. Thc devastated section was 'twice as large as thc speci- fied target area for thc five square miles. It accomplished more than we a conservative 21st bomber command review of thc attack said. Coupled with thc original fire raid March 9, Saturday's attacic completed the devastation of square miles acres of the. center of Tokyo. In round fig- ures, Saturday's raid alone knock- ed "out acres or square feet. Tokyo broadcasts .s a i d fires spread Saturday to thc Mikado's palace and other imperial build- ings. Fires still were raging in Tokyo when today's huge armada arriv- ed over thc capital 'to, in the words of an official announce- ment, "continue the strategic des- truction of Japnne.sc industries." Intense Gen, John H. Davis of Piedmont, Calif., commander of Tinian-bascd B-29s, said the Su- perfortresses "bumped into a ter- rific barrage of -flak" over the capital. "They stayed right on the at- tack, though, and dropped their bombs right on the he id. The bombed from alti- tudes of to feet. A Japanese communique said n "considerable number" o f fires wns started, but all were control- led by 5 a. m. Other.Tokyo broad- nssertcd that thc Soviet embassy was destroyed by fire. Fifty-five were shot down by Japanese night 'ightcrs, Tokyo claimed, and ano- hcr 50 damaged. United Nations, war has been- de- in no. small -ineas- _of_our departed commander 'We are now .carrying out our part of that strategy under :the able direction of Adm. Leahy, Gen. Marshall, Adm. King, Gen. Arnold, Gen. Eisenhower. Adm'. Nimitz and Gen. McArthur. want the entire world :'to know that this direction must and will and unhampered. Looking to the April 25 confe'r- uice of the United Nations--in San Francisco, Mr. Truman said 'we will face the problems: of. peace with the same courage that: WoVihavb. faced. and mastered', the: problems 'of war. In memoiy of those who have riiad-j the .supreriie. sacrificerHiiri the memory of our fallen pros shall not .Yearning- Not Enough' is "not. enough he said We must woik and if neces sary fight for it The task of rcatmj, a sound intern itionil or gimration n complicated and dif- ficul Yet without such organ the rights man on eartl Cdn not bi. protected Ma chinery for the just settlement of international differences.--must be found Without such machm ery tht entile world will have to emam an armed camp doom ed to deadly conflict oid of hope for real peace v Expressing the importance of ront nued international coopera on by the nations which must crcd the force necessiry to de feat tht conspiiticy of the fascist powers to dominate the world the new pitMlcnf said WhilS these h eai a special responsibility to enforce the peace their i esponsibility is the obligations-rest ing upon all states large and Ul not to use force m inter- i ttiDiidl i cl itions except m thc defense of lau Ihc responsibil ty of the groat stales is to and riot dominate the. the world. .In MSumblo Muod Li an huniblc: mood. Hie. b'c- small stitiued new ncad of the Air'., lean menf appealed I Amer ican regardless OL party race creed 01 colo- to support out cf forts- to build lasting United Nations; organization. He mide a forthright appeal to congress of Inch he had bum a member, for help and.cooperation. 'Your-tlie members of congress, Uy know how I fed he said to the jomt session Only with your help can I hope to complete one of tlie grcitost tasks Lvtr as to a.public servant. divine guidance and your help, we. will find: the new pass- age to a far better world, a hlnd- y and friendly world, with just and lasting peace. Kepeats N'eri'ssity Repeatedly he spoke of thc 'nec- essity' of avoiding a flimsy peace would lead to future con- lict "To destroy greedy, tyrants with plans of world domination, vc cannot continue in successive jencvations to sacrifice our finest youth. In thc name of human decency and a .rpore rational method of deciding na-. tionul differences must and will be he said, "must an- suffering humanity back ilom; tlie path of peaceful ;re.ss. This will require lime and iiice. We. shall need also an i biding faith in the people, the tint! "f faith and courage, which franklin Delano Uoose.velt always lad." Ivrritcs rniycr .The gravity of his new role in the future of thc world was rc- 'luctcd in the simple way Mr. Truman told the congress that this moment, I have in m'y icarl a prayer. As I assume my icavy dunes, I luimhly pmy t" Almighty God. in thc words of Solomon: "Give, therefore, thy servant an understanding heart to judge thy people, that I may discern (Continued on Pnftc 3) ISrinj; Your OLD CLOTIIKS to COLLECTION AMKKICAN Ll'XilON Mil Main Ml, If you have no allon Call SDfi and will call.   

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