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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: March 12, 1945 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - March 12, 1945, Yuma, Arizona                             THE WXATHXB AT YUMA An reported by II. S. Weather Bureau Highest last 24 hours..................83 Lowest last 2-1 hours..................51 Average high this date..................77 Average low this (late..................-19 AND TH TINIL WEATHER FORECAST TO TUESDAY NIGHT Fair and continued warm VOLUME GO YUMA, ARIZONA MONDAY, MARCH THE ARIZONA SENTINEL- VOLUME GO YANKS DEEPEN REMAGEN BRIDGEHEAD RUSSIANS INSIGHT OF STETTIN Nazis Say Allied Air Force Aiding Soviets There By KOKEKT MUSEI, United Press Staff Correspondent LONDON, March 12 (U.R) A strong force of American bomb- ers attacked the Baltic coast to- day in direct support of the Red and unofficial Moscow re- ports said a decisive break- through before Berlin was cxpect- ,cd soon. If the Americans hit the Stet- Un-Swinenuiende s o.c tor, their bombs fell in plain view of Rusr sian troops storming .the Oder fortifications. The firsl official announcemenl not name the Baltic objectives. Powerful U. S. air forces attack-. ed Germany by. daylight. Berlin said.raiders were over Stettin, ap- parently to. strike a crushing blow in the closest support yet given the Red army by Allied bombers from the west. Soviet dispatches said Marshal Gregory K. Zliukoy's army .was storming' the Oder estuary north and south of Stettin, and a.great battle, for river crossings was in full swing. 3 Armies Hammer. The German high command said three Russian armies were ham- mering the Nazi bridgehead across the Oder from Stettin. Counter- blows knocked out 28 Soviet tanks, it added. cjommunicu.ie said Zhu- koy's First. White Russian army i continued relentless atlacks in the Oder'valley befort Berlin, where a Soviet bridgehead earlier reached within 20 miles of the capital. United Hen- ry Shapiro reported from Moscow that the Soviet news blackout on the Berlin front continued, "pend- ing a decisive breakthrough which is expected in the near future." Front Defined He defined .the blacked-out front as extending, froin the area of Kucslrin! 38 miles cast of Berlin, to Gocrlitz, on the.Niessc river 100 miles south of Kuestrin, 105 south- cast of Berlin, and 55-1 east of Dresden. This suggested thai Ihe whole defense system cast and southeast of Berlin was about to fall apart. The German broadcasts suggest- cd that the American planes were attacking Stettin and Swincmucn- dc, 35 miles to the north at the Baltic entrance to Stettin bay. The raids came as Soviet front dispatches were reporting that the Red army had driven within sight of Stettin after breaking through the city's last belt of outer forti- .fications on the east.- Position Seems Hopeless "Stettin's position appeared hope- a. front dispatcli published in the Moscow newspaper Pravda (Continued on Page 3) Pfc. J. R. Leongis Awarded Purple Heart Pfe. John R. Leong, son of N. H. Leong, Yuma businessman, has been awarded the Purple Heart medal for wounds received in action against the Japanese in the Philippine, islands Feb. 4. 19-10, according to word received his father. He is a member of a medical detachment attached to a .U. S. Army infantry unit. IWO'S FALL APPEARS IMMINENT Last Sizeable Jap Pocket Being Cut Down By Marines Ky FRANK United I'rcss War GUAM, March 12 Com- plete conquest of appeared at hand today. Weary Marines were driving- the last Japanese defen- ders into the sea .in a final battle along the north coast. (A Japanese broadcast report- ed by the FCS said Japanese troops had lost most, of their heavy a r m s, hand grenades, swords, and bayonets. It said the Iwo battle ..was "growing' in fero- city daily.'.' Pacific Fleet headquarters .wiis expected to announce the. Collapse of organized resistanqe momen- tarily as. 'the bloodiest .campaign of the Pacific war entered its fourth w e e k on Japan's front doorstep. rocket. Is Cut Down A communique tin's morning said the Fifth division had whit- tled down the enemy's last size- able pocket to half a square mile along the north coast by 6 p. m. yesterday in heavy fighting. The Marines were making slow but steady progress with support of heavy artillery and the big guns of warships offshore. The .Third and. Fourth divisions crashed through- the last Japan- ese lines in 'eastern Iwo over the week-end and. captured most of the rock-ledged. east" coast, the communique said. ;One' small ene- my 'pocket was by-passed for la- ter. annihilation. Advance is Slow The advance along the north coast w a s a slow and tedious business. The last few thousand Japanese survivors of a garrison originally totalling crack troops were fighting to the death from pillboxes, blockhouse and caves, (The Tokyo Domei agency said the Japanese commander on Iwo had telegraphed the Japanese house of representatives that the (Continued on Page 3) WHERE AMERICANS CROSSED RHINE The railroad bridge over the Hlilno river :it Re Germany, which- was captured intact by troops (if'the. Armored Division of the First "Army. Working under cover of machine {runs wliltih streamed InilteU over their heads, American comlmt. -cit gin cent were .sm'.ressfnl in removing Ions of TNT from the bridge barely before the Germans Imd planned to blow.it up. U. S. Sigiial Corps Riulio- Telephyto. AMERICAN TROOPS AND VEHICLES CROSS RHINE American troops ami .vehicles of the .Arniorc'stl Division, First Army, advance toward the rail ruati-bridge background) to cross the Rhino, river'at Remagen, Germany. A mighty stream of men and 'equipment crossed the river to form a firm bridgehead bulging several miles into the German heart- land. U. S- Signal Corps photo by Kadio-Tclfiphoto. _ Arizona's Famed 158th Regiment Highly Commended by Gen. Wing For Skill, Courage in Battle Tho loSth Regimental Combat .days that have followed your unit Team, of which Yuma's own Com-I has experienced some ot the ficr- pany L is a unit, recently receiv- ed high praise for its combat ef- ficiency and the courage of its men from Maj. Gen, Leonard F. commander of the -13rd In- fnntry division. A copy of General Wing's com- mendation was received by Iwdia Levy of Yunm from her brother, S-Sgt. ,Tony Abrll a member of Uio 158th. The commendation, dated Feb. 12, 19-15, addressed to the ISSth's commanding general and all ranks, follows: "1, Although 'the campaign for the island of Luzon and the liber- ation of the Philippines is not yet complete, and there lay ahead of us many difficult 'task and mis- sions before the war is won, I wish you to know that I appre- ciate fully the great effort you Imvo made in connection with the battles' that ensued after o u r landing. "2. Your Combat Tcnm, charg- ed Initially with advancing north along 'the const nnd protecting the left flank of the Slx'th Army chme tinder my operational com- mand on 11 January 1945, In the cesl and bloodiest fighting had during this campaign. You have advanced and taken your objec- tives against stubborn and deter- mined enemy resistance, against strong, well-prepared and conceal- ed positions, almost constantly under direct enemy observation and artillery fire. The tactical skill that you and your subordin- ate commanders have used, the courage and determination of oil ranks, are In line with the best traditions of American fighting men. "The M7th Field Artillery Bat- talion has supported your opera- tion and that of other units at- tached to you in a superior man- ner. The supporting elements of the Combat Team have likewise demonstrated high combat effi- ciency. Your Infantry without whom ground cannot he 'taken and held, have been superb. They have fully demonstrated that the fighting, marching shooting, slug- ging "doughboys" con always take one more stop, fire one more sho't, throw one more hand gren- ade and deliver one more thrust Mqn Is Sought Here Because Of Illness In Family Jimmie CalUihuii, thought to be working here for a construction company, is being sought by the attaches of the sheriff's office to notify him of illness in his fam- ily. So far. the officers hare not been able lo locai'-i Uie man. If any.-should -know Mm they 'are requested to have him contact the sheriff's office immediately. RFC to Sell Obsolete Or Damaged Planes I LOS ANGELES, March 12 (U.R) T ii e Reconstruction Finance Corp. disclosed today that nearly 600 obsolete or damaged govern- ment airplanes have been assem- bled at the Cal-Acro airport near Ontario for re-sale. By mid-summer, more than 3000 planes arc expected to bo in the "pool" one of four esln- blishccl in 'the southwest. Seven thousand -others will he at fields in Phoenix, Blylhc and burg, Ariz. George Adams KFC's sur- plus war aircraft division explain- ed thai. Ihe oulmoded ships, many of t li e m UC-78 'twin motored Cessna utility cargo planes, are sold to the highest bidders, with set minimums prevailing. Pfc. A. Noriega Awarded Combat Infantry Badge Ihe 3Slh' Division on Ha- inan Pfc. Arnulo Noriega of Yuma, Arizona, has jusl been awarded t h c Coinhnl Infantry badge for Inking pail in Ihc hat- He for Zigzag Pnss. Entering the army in February 1043, Norjcga n. rifleman in tho 15tst Infantary. IK the husbrind of Airs. Grace Norieg.i of Yuma. His pnren'ts Mr. nnd Mrs. A. Nor- cga also reside in Ynnin, Me also holds the Philippines Liberation ribbon nnd the Asiatic Holds Hearing on Request to Hike City Budget To Get Fire Equipment Joe Hunt, member of the state der the guise'of. being spon.suret! tax commission, held .a hearing for the commission, in the city government 'to declare an emer- gency in the city's Ifl'H anrt 1945 fiscal year budget in the amount of S28.516.00, It is proposed to use the bulk of this amount, of it, for the purpose of increasing the efficiency jOf the city fire depart- ment. Mayor Walter S. IngulLs and Councilmen Dabtas and Anderson were present for the hearing1, as were a member of Yuma business men and Shelton Mackenzie, tax expert for the Southern Pacific I'ailroad -company, and Steve Spear, of the Arizona taxpayers association. Some time ago a committee from thn Yuma merchants asso- ciation had appeared before the council and made three requests on behalf of their association: 1) That new ,-vnd more.adequate fire equipment be purchased. 2) That the city do something about the packs o f stray dogs running around over the cfty. That no by some local organization. The council at -the following meeting voted the carnival ban. Plans are under way for the city and county to support the drive to eradicate stray dogs. And the hearing todny was principally on the fire equpiment proposal. Of the the city pro- poses to spend in the emergency, it would be spent for fire department equipment SK-J.500.00 for a. new pumper; 000.00 for hose, equipment and accessories for the pumper; and for a bungalow type fire statioan further out toward the mesa area to house the old pumpej and other equipment and thus cut down the time for runs to that area. Also included in the expendi- tures were: For the dog eradication pro- gram, sjilnry for pound master and 5.100.00 for a dog pound. For 'the city recorder for a typewriter. For the city fissrsKor'H office, more carnivals be permitted to s 3130.00 for a typewriter and show within tho city limits un-j (Continued on Page 5) Mexican Youth Shot by North Gsia Valley Rancher; Expected to Live Thomas Camarino, operator of a small ranch in the North Gila valley, came lo Ihc sheriff's of- fice here around mit'.nighl Satur- day night and reported that he had shot a Mexican youlh, Nacho Ccwartes, age 22. Deputies from the sheriff's of- fice wenl to the scene and inves- tigated. Cewartcs was brought io the Yuma General hospital in an am- bulance where he is expected to recover despite a serious wound. He had been shot Ihrough his body, the bullet from a ,12-20 re- volver entering his left chest, high up, and ranging downward (Continued on page 0) pnlgn slat's. Pacific ribbon with two cam-_nnd coming out in his back to the right side of the spine. Officers reported thai inquiry revealed a group of "wet" Mex- icans had been drinking and had gone to the Camarino ranch home. Mr. Camarino tried to send them away, it is said, but some of them became threatening. Ccwartes is said to have been approaching Ihc rancher witti the expressed intention to attack him when he fired one shot from his pistol. Although the bullet ranged Ihrough the youth's body it did nol strike a bone that would cause it to spread. ,The wound was therefore not large, officers being not much larger at the plcrc where it left thn body than it at. point of eiuvy. Mr. Ciumrino was not held, B-29SSET IN NAGOYA Others From India Hit Singapore And Kuala Lumpur By E. O. VAM5NS United Press War Correspondent GUAM, March (U.R) Fires visible nearly 100 miles at sea raced uncontrolled today through Nagoya, Japan's greatest aircraft, manufacturing center, after 300 Superfortresses sowed tons of inccdiary bombs through the center of the city. Only one of the giarit planes was lost in the raid 21st Bomber Command-headquarters reported. Swinging '1G5 miles west' from still-burning Tokyo, the giant ar- mada unloaded death and des- truction" on 'five square miles of war business blocks, gov-' crnment buildings and flimsy dwellings in the tinder-box cen- ter of .Nagoya for two hours un- der cover of darkness early today. Returning pilots said the rain of .bombs, more concentrated even than, the tons which burned out 35 square miles of Tokyo Saturday, kindled "hellish fires" that threatened to spread far be- yond the original target area. Fires .Still Binning A Japanese communique indi- cated that a.number -of fires still were out of control at p. .m. more than 16 the It', said a fire., had. been -.started iii the; of the A'tsuta shrine, one of 10 large Shinto'or religious .shrines :in -Japan, but added that "main: and detach- ed shrines were safe.' Gcri. Curtis Le May, com-" mander of 'the 21st Bomber com- mand in the Marianas, reserved judgement until all'. reports were in, but .said "so. far the attacks appears very successful.' From Washington came word lhat B-29's of the 20th Bomber command. in India also were'in action today. 'A medium probably 100 in- dustrial targets in the Singapore area for the sixth time! The 20th command Kuala. Lum- pur, 200 miles north of Singapore, Saturday. Jap -Claim A Tokyo Dome! Agency dis- patch said -40 B-29's participated in the attack on Singapore and caused. only "extremely slight" Two Superfortresses wer. shot down and third dam- aged, Tokyo, said. Superfortresses which struck at Nagoya, Japan's third largest'city (Continued, on Page S) LK John Eastlick Reports For Duty At Carlsbad Field Carlsbad Army Air Field, Carlsbad, New Alexico Lieuten- ant John T Eastlick, son Jack T. Eastlick, 571 Orange Ave., Yumn Arizona, has reported for duty at the Carlsbad Army Air Field, Carlsbad, New Mexico. He is a graduate of Arizona state teachers college, Flagstaff, Arizona, Colorado state college, Greeley, Colo., ami the U. of Denver, Colorado. He was commissioned August 7, 1M4, from civil life at Yakima Washington. I. V. Tomatoes to Leave Tonight By Plane For East KL CBNTRO, Calif., March 12 thousand pounds of to- matoes will take to the air from here tonight, bound for a Cleve- land, O. market. The planeload of red fruit, first from Imperial valley to be deliv- ered by air, will be carried by American Airlines to Cleveland's Fisher Brothers it was announc- ed today. Files Divorce Suit Suit for divorce hns been filed here by Estefana Terrin Navarro against Antonio. Navarro. The couple was married at Yuma Dec. 3. 1918. They scparalcd in 1031 and have not since lived to- gether, the complaint states. There is one child, 17 years of ngc, Lt.CoLBoutz Awarded Legion Lt Col. William F. Eoulz, of Yuma, Ariz., hag been awarded the Legion of Merit medal for ex- ceptional performance o f. duty while serving as liaison office of Chinese division '.in a recent Burma campaign according to a release Army Signal Corps press rlease. He received .the medal from Lt. Gen. Dan T. Sultan, com- mander; of 'troops' in India-Burma theater. m U.S. TROOPS ADVANCEQN MINDANAO Veterans of Diyisjpn Approach Zatnboangq By H. QtHGG United Press War .Correspondent I March 12 .S invasion forces, ncarcdr'the heart of 'Zamboanga on crn tip-of villages and two airfields oil the-island, .sec 'ond largest :Battle-seasoned 'units :'6f'. Maj Gen. .Jens A.- Doc's 41st': division of the- Eighth army'-Xlandcd-.on beaches Saturday against-: light opposition..''.'.-' and two airstrips, west.c of; Zainboah- ga's administrative' center, .were rapidly overrun "r'.nd -.Gdn. Ddug- las MacArthur. nntg'unccd that Americoji: rcconniiissahce .-'.planes already were, dpcntthig from tlic island. (A Tokyo, -broadcast, 'recorded by FCC, said American forces al- so had landed Thursday Basil- an island, across .the ilan strait from Zamhoariga.'-.Tok yo claimed that the_ troops which stormed' -Mindanao panied by tanks.) The landing; on Minanao, 21sl Philippines, island, invaded by American, amphibious seal cd the entire western' side 'of the 800-mile- long Philippines archi pclago. It also brought MacAr- thur's forces within 180 miles., of oil-rich Borneo. A heavy air and naval bomljard- ment from heavy and. light cruis- ers preceded. the. landing from Basilan strait, which had..been swept for mines since Wednesday "Planes Cover. Landing Planes from both the Fifth and 13th airforces covered the landing so completely that no Japanese planes were sighted. The 33th air force had softened up the in- vasion points with more than 1, 000 tons of bombs during the (Continued on Page 5) NAZIS REPORT MOJOHJMEl- CROSSINGS German Pocket Near Coblenz Is Wiped Out Hy BKUCE W. MUNN: United 1'ress War PARIS, March meutan First aimy launched 'its j first-concentrated attack from, the Remagen bridgehead today and scored initial gains of more than a. mile, boosting the number of cap- tuied German towns across the -i Rhine .to 23: Lt Gen Courtney H. Hodges' headquarters announced1 tonight tliat powerful infantry units ported by tanks struck, eastward toward the superhighway -parallel- mg the Rhine east of Remagen. They advanced more than allude, and now were more than half way to the highway Late dispatches said after, to- day's steady expansion -of the bridgehead across the Rhine from Remagen, it was foui miles deep and.ten mile's wide. Joint blows of the TJ S First and Third armies wiped out a Gel man poc1 t.1 northwest Co- blenz Mcagci reports did no I" make clear whether the destroy- ed pocket was the big one formed by the American junction, on the Rhine, in which some Ger- mans were trapped s _ Lt Gen lamct H Doohttle's Eighth au force laid tt carpet of bombs on six key rail hubs east of the Rhine through which the GermansVcould key lail hubs east of the Rhine through which the Germans couJd move against, the First Aimy bridgehead opposite Runagen Patrol -Alhinlainoil" Fightel-bombers of tlie U S Nmth an force raked the Ger- inen uere massed in the bndge- bridgenead, and maintained a constant pptiol over the Luden- dorfE. bridge. v broadcasts acknowledged that tile Americans were pouring" reinforcements into the Rhine foothold They said shock pushed tho Rhine: ''the' Rcm.igen bridge in assault boats for new ciotsings The Nnm estimated that upwards of men wer massed in the bridge- head ready for a big push against tho-southern flank 'of. rthe Rii'nrJ bupreme headquarters said Gen Courtney H Hodges' troops- firmly, held the..initiative, in the Remagen bridgehead.. Tho Gerv'i mans still were shelling despite" the acquisition of high ground which' 'some enemy., observation- posts were situated. Reports Because of the nature, .of 'the. operations and precarious plight of the .enemy, SHAEF reports were purposely vague. For'.sequrr ity reasons a time lag was. im- (Continued on Pago S) Gov. Osborn Scores Legislators For Failing to Vote on Program; Says He Will Call Special Sessions PHOBNTX, Am., March 12 IU.PJ is the Sidney r. Osborn has set the slagc for an explosive spec ial session of the 17th legislature Short-lcmpercd from long hours of inter-chamber wrangling, tho. lawmakers closed their regular session near midnight on Satur- day with the governor's declar- ation ringing in their cars lhat lie would "call them back and hack and back again" until they had voted on every measure that he recommended at opening of the meeting last Jan. S. fA few. of the older hands in the legislature were inclined to he indulgent, pointing lo the lime- honored Ihcory that it is bad pol- ities for an Arizona governor to be friendly with the legislature. But many others were spurred lo anger by the last-minulc ti- rade, during which Osborn spoke slightingly of the legislators' ac- complishments and charged them with "failure" lo adopl proposals contained In the Democratic state platform and in his own list of recommendations. Knrtus Itcnlics Rep. Sidney Kartus, of Mari- copa county, asserted on the floor of the house In the dying mln- ulca of the session that "Osborn, in sheep's clothing? for his remarks on failure of the' legislature lo boost the slate old- age rissislance maximum from to S30 a -month. 'Lasl fsovember in the general election he was silent as the tomb- regarding the 560 at CO or the pension measures on the bal- sai.d hi: corims here tonight after our labors arc completed and makes an-infanUle crilic.ism of Ihe legislature. "After skulking In his den for (10 days he comes barking at our heels when it is too late to do anything for these welfare causes he espouses only, to betray thcrn. He already has betrayed both thu aged and labor." Voicing an ironic parody, Winston Churchill's famous trib- ute to the Royal Air Force, born said "never have so many. Inhered so much and produced no little." Among specific complaints lev- eled by Ihe governor .wan Uiii legislature's ''failure" to: Provide for a special llon of the rules by the federal power mission; create a pomwar plan- ning commission and 'a-Siliiti; lab> (Continued on Page 6}   

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