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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - December 17, 1943, Yuma, Arizona                             TUB WKATIIKR AT YUMA As Rfportwl by S. Bureau Highest last 24 hours Lowest last 21 hours 51 Average high this date G7 Average low this date -Iti TH AND THE T1NEL WEATHER FORECAST TO SATURDAY NIGHT: Considerable cloudiness with sible light showers Saturday; mild temperatures. VOLUME 298 YUMA, ARIZONA FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1943 THE ARIZONA SENTINEL- VOLUME 298 BIG BOMBERS AGAIN BLAST NAZI CAPITAL More Than 1500 Tons Dropped On Berlin By Mill.. AULT Vnited 1'ress Stuff C'orrespnnilenl LONDON. Doc. 17 dreds of the RAF's biggest bomb- ers resumed the knockout offen- sive against Berlin with a ton blockbuster assault that spread fire and ruin through the Nazi capital last night, and the German radio revealed today that American Flying Fortresses dam- aged Bremen heavily in a raid on that port yesterday. The German radio announce- ment was the first disclosure that Bremen was the target of yester- day's Fortress raid. The Nazis admitted "heavy destruction" in the big port city, which previ- ously had been pounded six timus by the American heavies and more than 100 times by the Royal Air Force. Blanketed Clouds The great armada that struck at Berlin last night fought through thick cloud formations that blanketed northwestern Ger- many, hut Pathfinder planes that preceded the raiders laid their target indicators squarely on the capital. Thirty miles from their objec- tive the black-winged raiders swung into a path of flares drop- ped by enemy night fighters and followed those flaming beacons right to the heart of Berlin. Tens of thousands of high explo- sive and fire bombs hurtled down on the battered city, putting; a thunderous end of the 13-day re- spite Berlin had enjoyed since its last visitation from the RAF. The German Transocean News Agency denounced the raid as "a terror attack on a considerable scale." Destruction Is Widespread (Stockholm reports broadcast 'by the BBC said foreign journal- ists in Berlin had been forbidden to transmit any description-of the. raid, but private information reaching the Swedish capital indi- cated the raid had created wide- spread destruction in the center of the city and the industrial out- skirts.) Despite the huge flare path laid by the Nazi fighters, many bomb- er crews reported they failed to see a single enemy plane over of the most heavily defended areas in all Europe. "Weather prevented immediate observation of the air (Continued on Page 41 JUGOSLAVS TURN BACK GERMAN OFFENSIVE By ROItKKT C. KU'IIAKOS I'nited Staff ('nrrrspmiilenl LONDON, Dec. 17 shal Josip Broi-iovirh's Partisan Army of liberation reported to- day that it had broken a full scale German offensive in Jugoslavia and. launching- a widespread coun- terdrive, had administered "heavy defeaU" to the Nazis in a number of .sectors. The Jugoslavs issued a regular nnd a special communique pro- claiming that tlie tide of battle had turned in their homeland. "Tin- great offensive against Hhcruifil ttMrilory has failed to develop according tn ciu'iny the spe- cial rtmmuiniqm' said. "From nil sectors reports are coming in of enemy failures ami of suc- cesses achieved by Jugoslav anils." The special bulletin closely fol- (Continued on ljage U. S. TROOPS ADVANCING IN ITALY Cut Way Through Pill Boxes And Barbed Wire Jap Defense System in Southwest Pacific Appears to Be Crumbling And Allies Advance on New Britain liy SA.VDOK S. 1U.EIN .'lines and Dutch East Indies, an United 1'ress Stall' Correspondent j area where American submarines WASHINGTON. Dec. 17 are highly active. The entire Japanese defense pes-; Although the forces under Gen. ition in the Southwest Pacific. Douglas MacArthur were credited SCHOOLS CLOSE TODAY FOR All schools in the county except the Yuma Union high school and Gadsden school close today for a two weeks Christmas vacation pe- riod and wiil resume classes on January 3. Mrs. Gwyneth Ham. county superintendent, announced today. The Yuma Union high school and Gadsden school will dismiss on Wednesday. Dee. 22 and take up classes again on Jan. offic- ials of those schools announced. Community Sing Is Planned For Sunday, 4 P. M. ...L.I LIIV (tnuiuui-t.- ji singing the songs. There will be no charge. Nan WRITER IS DENIED GAS RATIONS DUE TO ARTICLE CHICAGO, Dec. 17 (U.R) Mark Miller, author of a magazine ar- ticle describing bis automobile trip from Brownsville, Tex., to Brainerd, Minn., on bootleg gaso- line, was denied today the right to gasoline ration coupons for the first half of 39-H, for violation of Office of Price Administration regulations. The ruling was made by W. M. McFarland, regional OPA com- missioner, who ordered that no IB'I'I coupon be issued to Miller because of the trip, revealed in the in-Uric, appearing in Colliers Mag- azine. McFarland placed Miller on probation nnd left the wny open for his local rationing board to ismic rt coupon hook next June if the writer compiles with certain conditions laid down In the order. U. S. SUBS SINK EIGHT JAP SHIPS Brings Total to 524 Nip Vessels Hit By Submarines WASHINGTON, Dec. 17 (U.R) American submarines, backstop- ping Allied offensive operations in the Pacific by striking at the enemy's supply lines, have sunk eight more Japanese ships. The navy announced today that the latest bag by U. S. submarines included two large transports, two large tankers. three medium freighters aiid a small freighter. These sinkings raised to 524 the number of Japanese ship hit by our submarines so far in the war. Tlu's included 3.7-1 sunk, SB. prob- ably sunk, and IH'.damaged. Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox said recently there was de- finite evidence that the Japanese are growing desparately short of merchant tonnage and are being forced more and more to rely on barges for transport and supply. Fire Destroys Coupe, Parked On Street Probably originating from a short circuit, fire last evening about o'clock almost com- pletely destroyed a 1939 conver- tible coupe belonging to Rudolph Plhl, Jr.. 618 Eighth avenue, ac- cording to a report on file at the city fire department this morning. The cnr had a California license. No. 3P6693. The owner is a high school boy. Although no general alarm was sounded, firemen were called to the scene and extinguished the blaze before the troyed. The Pihl family was not at home at the time of the fire By C R. CUNNINGHAM United Press Stalf Correspondent ALLIED HEADQUARTERS. Algiers. Dec. 17 (U.R) American troops have launched a smashing attack to reach the main road to Rome, meeting the Germans in a hand-to-hand struggle at the vil- lage of San Pietro, a mile from the vital highway, it was an- nounced today. Large scale renewal of the Fifth Army offensive to break through I orations. 1 to the road coincided with the sec-1 Supply j ond major blow in two days by Flying Fortresses against Ger- many's rail supply lines into Italy. In their first powerful blow against Padua, 25 miles west of Venice in northern Italy, the For- tresses dropped 200 tons of bombs in less than six minutes, partially wrecking a rail bridge and the Padua yards. Five enemy planes were shot down and not a bomber was lost. Go Thru Barbed Wire Springing down the slopes against San Pietro after lines of guns in the Sammucro heights had battered the enemy lines, Lt. Gen. Mark W. Clark's American troops hacked their way forward through, concrete pill-box defenses and miles of barbed wire. The attack was launched eight miles southeast of Cassino, which lies acres the Liri Valley plains from the Sammucro heights. Cas- sino was the hub of neur German defensi.3 iu the Fifth's area.- Farther north other Fifth army forces beat back German counter- attacks west of Venafro and took new hills west of Filignano find southwest of Castel San Vinccnzo, gaining one mile at one point. Across Italy, the British Eighth army hurled back strong German counterattacks made with flame- throwing tanks in an effort to stem troops edging through the broken Orton Guardiagreie de- fense line. Cairo radio, heard in London, said Eighth army troops were only l.S miles from Ortona, on the Ad- riatic coast, and that the town was in flames. Break-throughs had occurred a t several points, the broadcast said. Viaduct Is Bombed Accompanying the Fortresses to north Italy was a Liberator for- mation thai ballered a railroad vi- aduct at Dogna, near the Austrian frontier. The line attacked is the i Continued on Page i) built around the key island of New Britain, appeared to be crum- bling today as Allied forces con- solidated their newly-won beach ADVANCED AI.IJED HEAD- QUARTERS, New Guinea, Dec. 17 (U.P.) One determined soldier :his rubber boat shredded by withering Japanese fire grinned as landing barges followed up the initial as- and he waggled hitch-hike. Halter, Vienna, Nazi Say Reds On Offensive Near Leningrad and it is understood that a neigh- bor or passer-by discovered and reported that tlie ear was afire. By ROBERT MUSEL tires were des-j United Press Staff Correspondent LONDOX, Dec. 17 (U.R) The Berlin radio reported today that JUDGE ESCAPES FROM LABOR GANG Tlic .ludge, who has spent two mornings on the wrong side of the bar of justice, suddenly ad- journed his "term" without notice massed Russian forces had launched an offensive on the Len- ingrad front, breaking into the German lines at several places, in what appeared here to be the first blow of the Red army's long- delayed winter campaign. A Nazi broadcast said the Ger- mans had been engaged in "hard defensive fighting near Lenin- grad" since yesterday, and the bitter battle still was raging inde- cisively. A number of Soviet breakins were the radio said. Signs have been increasing that the Red army was awaiting only an improvement in weather con- ditions and a frozen foothold to strike in full force at the unstable German front. yesterday afternoon. The "judge" is Charles Judge, j who on Tuesday morning' was giv- a suspended sentence of 190 days in police court on condition that he leave town when he plead- ed guilty to being drunk and dis- turbing the peace, was back again before lit- was able to comply with the original sentence. To straighten him out the sec- ond lime. Judge James T. Hodges gave Judge 113 days at hard labor for thp eily. which he eagcrliy ac- cepted. But yesterday afternoon the work in the city became too strenuous and he suddenly WASHINGTON. Dec. 1 made-'u'p his mind to accept the President Roosevelt has signed first, sentence and "float." legislation which lifts the ban That's the best said against Chinese becoming natur- F. R. Signs Bill To Lift Ban Against Chinese .Tiiilgi- Hodges. "He won't be expense to the city now." Soviet Postpones Elections Third Time During War MOSCOW. Pec. 17 (ll.m Presi- dent Mikhail Kalinin has signed a decree postponing elections to the Supreme Soviet until Dec., 10-I-I, the third postponement of elections since the war started, it was announced today. Daily Temperatures By IIMTKI) 1'RKSS High New York 28 20 Chicago........2.1 P St. Louis 20 fi Minneapolis Seattle 32 Denver fifl 20 Phoenix VI '111 alizcd citizens of the United States and permits Chinese to en- ter this country as immigrants on a quota basis, it was announced today. Mr. Roosevelt, in urging enact- ment of the bill recently, said it would correct "a historic mistake" exclusion of Chinese from en- tering the United Slides. He said it would "operate as another meaningful display" of friendship between two great powers fight- ing a common foe. The law repeals the Chinese Ex- clusion Acts passed between 1882 and 1013. nnd the quota provision will permit 105 persons of Chinese descent to enter this country an- nually. Eighty-five per cent of the immigrants must come from Chmn itself. Bicycle Is Stolon Theft of his daughter's bicycle was reported to the nlicrlff's of- fice by Jones Smith yesterday I'venlng. heads on that island iu prepara- least well equipped, well lion for a drive on the important' enemy base- at Rabaul. The invasion of New Britain came after relentless Allied air at- tacks on Rabaul had rendered it useless as a sea base and had left the Japanese their major naval base at Triilt. SOO miles to the north, as the nearest available harbor for concentrating heavy shipping for southwest Pacific op- s. Koule Is Cut At tiie same time, Allied control of the Vitiaz straits between New Britain and New Guinea cut the shortest supply route to the re- maining enemy garrisons on New Guinea, where Australian troops are making slow but steady ad- vances. Thus, the only supply route left to enemy forces there was to the west, from the Philip- with initial successes on New Bri- tain, the big and tougher battles weu- still ahead because the en- emy was estimated to have at RUSSIANS ADVANC! RADEMSSl Reds .Regaining Lost Ground On The Kiev Front supplied troops there. From Arawe on New Britain's soutluvest coast, where the main landings were made, the Attics must fight along the coast for ahout 270 miles before getting within range of Rabaul. Some ob- servers here believed it may even- tually be necessary to make a frontal assault on Rabaul before it can finally be occupied. Has Good Defenses Rabaul has perhaps the best natural defenses of any base in the southwest Pacific. The harbor is rimmed by mountains and vol- canoes, so that approach from land would be difficult and easily if not impossible. The harbor it- self is difficult to approach be- cause of a narrow channel which separates the Rabaul end of New {Continued on Page 4) Wounded Soldier, His Rubber Boat Destroyed by Jap Bullets Off Arawe, Hitchhikes Ride Back to Warship sault at Arawe his thumb for a Capt. Harold ALLIED AIRMEN S IN ITALY ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, Algiers, Dec. 17 (U.R) Allied planes carrying out a 24-hour of- fensive over Jugoslavia and raid- ing German supply routes in Nor- thern Italy shot down 11 enemy planes yesterday to roll their tot- al up to 101 destroyed so far this month, it was announced today. In the same period, 30 Allied planes have been lost as result of enemy action. Six of yesterday's score were shot down out of a group of 15 Messerschmitt 109's encountered over Jugoslavia and the other five fell over Padua, in North Italy. U, S. Mitchells attacked ships tlie harbor at Zara and Sibenik i the Jugoslav coast yesterday after Bostons had raided inland areas the night before. Several vessels were hit, including a 450- footer. Japs Again 'Wipe Out' U. S, Fleet Via Tokyo Radio PHOKXTX, Ariz., Dec. 17 b. D. Brewer, of Phoenix, who identifies himself as a monitor for the British broadcasting corpora- tion, reported today a Tokyo ra- dio broadcast saying the United States Navy lost 67 warships sunk by the Japanese in the Gilbert and MarshiH Island battle Thurs- day. Brewer quoted the Tokyo bioad- cnst as follows: In the Gilbert ami Marshall is- land battle the TT. S. Navy lost 67 warships -inc.Iudinff 5 battle- ships. 15 aircraft carriers, in de- stroyers and a large number nf cruisers." "The U. a. Navy has thus lest its great majority of trained of- ficers and men." 'the Tokyo radio continued, "and can never recuper- ate from this luss." R. M. Sanders, 55, Dies Following Long Illness Robert. M. Sanders. 5.1. a resi- dent of North tOth avenue, passed away at bin homo last night after an illness of about two years. He came to Yuma from Okla- homa two years. He has made his home with his sister, Mrs. Viola Drury, since coming to Yuma. No arrangements have been funeral nuuie. CAR IS REPORTED STOLEN HERE also made the beach after his boat was shot from under him. He described the incident and the chaos that ensued when the Jap- anese surprised the first landing party at the village of Umtinjalu with a point-blank barrage of i-an- non and machine-gun fire. Halter and 10 soldiers, almost helpless in the face of murderous enemy cross-fire, managed to drag an undamaged boat from the beach. Struggling against the tide and using entrenching tools as paddles, they steered the boat of range of enemy bullets. "I saw one corporal holding his blood-covered hand from which ends of two fingers had been Halter, a press officer, said. "Fifteen feet away a naked sol- dier swam, begging not to be left. We let him hang on until we found a raincoat to hide his white body." "A warship off Piielo island picked us up, almost exhausted af- ter a three hour pull." Halter said the ship fished more than 70 soldiers from the sea. He was permitted to select at random the names of 10 who are safe, in- cluding C. R. Mead. Santa Maria, Cal. tty IIK.VnV SHAPIRO I'nittul Press Stuff CorrespomJiMit MOSCOW, Dec. 17 (U.R) -The Red army beat oft" repeated Gor- man counterattacks today and ad- vanced into new positions within striking distance of Radomisi, key road junction li-1 miles west Kiev. The Russians yielded Ratlomisl to the Germans several days ago, but with the arrival of reinforce- ments, regained lust ground northwest of the junction and were developing a flanking threat. (London sources said the center of the battle line appeared to be along an eight-mile front stretch- ing between Lyakhnvak, six miles northwest of Radumisl, ami Nyan- evka, seven miles. southwest of Malin.) Tomis Arn Captured The latest Soviet advance swept up several additional towns and villages above Radomisl. The Ger- mans lost SOO men in futile coun- terattacks and at une point were thrown hack when they attempted to force a river barrier. The Soviets also broke enemy resistance south and southeast of Cherkasi, nearly 100 miles down the Dnieper from Kiev, and cap- tured several additional localities. Four hundred Germans were killed and four tanks wrecked. -I Miles From Smela At one point the Soviets were only four miles from Smela, 15 miles below Chcrkasi and last German-held railroad junction in the northern half of the Dnieper DEATH TOLL OF TRAIN WRECK REACHESjO Ky HANCOCK N. C., Dec. 17 The known dead in yesterday's collision... of. Uie .south .-and_jioEth-- ijound Tamiami Champions rose to SO today, the Red Cross re- ported, as a railroad official said lie could not explain why the wreck could not have been avert- ed in the 40 minutes between the derailment of one train and the arrival of. the other. The Red Cross said its latest breakdown from the scene of the accident was that 47 of the dend were service personnel, 23 were and that 10 bodies were known to be still in two cars. The known toll had bean in- creased to 70 only a short time before, when the body of an un- identified civilian was removed from a twisted railroad car, and searchers later reported that two cars each contained five bodies. C. G. Sibely, genei-al manager Continued on Page 4 bend. Red Air Force bombers, strik- U. S. Fliers Raid Jap Bases On Marshalls PEARL HARBOR, De.c. 17 (U.R) U. S. bomber raids through fierce Japane.se resistance on Maloclap and Wotjp atolls in the Marshalls were disclosed to- day as a front dispatch reported partial destruction of the enemy air base at Jaluit in a recent at- tack. Admiral Chester W. NimiU. Pa- cific Fleet commander, announced that 40 tons of bombs were dropped Wednesday on Taroa, a main islet of Maloclap. and Wotjc. Stung by Uie continuous raids on the Marshalls, the Japanese put 30 defending planes in the air above Taroa but two of thorn were destroyed, eight probably des- troyed and eight damaged. One Boniiicr Is Lost One of the attacking bombers of the 7th U. S. Airforce was lost and several others damaged. One man suffered fatal injuries. None of those attacking Wotjc were damaged. Installations on both islands were hit heavily, with fires spring- ing up behind the explosive loads on Wotje. Buildings and storage areas at Taroa were hit. BELGIUM SEEKS TO JOIN BRITISH COMMONWEALTH LONDON, Dec. 17 (U.R.' The London Daily Sketch said today that Belgium, "given certain es- sential guarantees" was ready to "put her future in charge of the British to become, in fnct. n member of the British Common- wealth of Nations." This assumption, the newspaper said, was "cautiously approved" hy a spokesman of the Relgium Min- istry of Information when ques- tioned ahout a speech made earli- er in the day by his chief, An- toine Delfosse. Dclfosse was quoted as saying at Belfast that "Belgians are ready to sacrifice part ot' our .sov- ereignty on the altar of world and it was necessary that a big power take slops to ensure stolen from near the Bagby I peace In Europe and thnt "no one wrecking yards yesterday after- could do It better than the Urit- ncmn. isl> Commonwealth." A nir belonging to D. A. Weems was have been ing out in advance of ground forces, blew up a German military train at Smela. The Russians overran a number of strongly-fortified towns near the industrial city of Kirovograd, 62 miles southwest of Krcmen- chug, and a full-scale Soviet as- sault on the stronghold was be- lieved near. In one sector, the Germans counterattacked wih 25 tanks and infantrymen, but were thrown back to their initial posi- tions witii a loss of nine tanks. WASHINGTON. Dec. 17 Congressional concern over cur- rent military losses was under- scored today with disclosure that the senate's Truman committee is investigating the "costly Nazi bombing of Bari and the high cost of capturing Tarawa in the Gil- berts. The Truman committee report- edly was investigating solely from tlie point of supply and perfor- tnce of materiel and is avoiding scrupulously anything that could be construed as second- guessing in military strategy. What the to know, it was emphasized, is whe- ther mure or better materiel could have forestalled such events as Bari and Tarawa. Tiie Bari attack, which cost 17 Allied ships and casualties and was described as tiie most se- vere blow to Allied shipping Pearl Harbor, was expected to prompt further conferences with Gen. H. H. Arnold, chief nf Uie army air forces. ves :xtension Of Subsidy Plan PRESIDENT RETURNS TO WHITE HOUSE Will Report On Parleys Early In January WASHINGTON, Dec. 17 President Roosevelt returned to the White House today from his Cairo and Tehran conferences and given a loud welcome by vir- tually every important figure in the government. The first thing Mr. Roosevelt did after shaking hands with his countless old friends was to hold a quick conference with his con- gressional leaders and them that he will not be able to report directly to Congress on his trip until he delivers his annual State of the Union message in early January. The President did indicate, how- ever, to the Congressional leaders that he would devote some of his Christmas Eve address to a dis- cussion of his conferences. Welcome- Is Tumtiltous As Roosevelt stepped from his automobile under the south portico of the White House he was given a tumultous welcome by leaders of both parties in Con- gress. cabinet members, and agen- cy heads. Mr. Roosevelt looked extremely fit after his long journey. He wore a rumpled gray suit and a loud plaid shirt. Watching the photographers as he got out of his car, he said: "I would have dressed for the occasion if I had known about this." Mrs. Roosevelt, her daughter, Mrs. John Boettiger, and three grandchildren, Sistie, Buzzie and Little Johnny, met the President at the point of his arrival in the city and rode with him to the White House. Secrelary Greets Him The first person to greet the President at the White House was his secretary, Grace Tully. Mr. ooscvelt was hit by a barrage of "hello" and "how are you" from members of his White House staff. The President spotted John. the presidential barber and White House butler, commenting "John. I certainly need a haircut." War Mobilaztioa Director Jnmes F. Byrne rushed up to the side of tlie presidential car and Roose- velt called out over the heads of the photographers, "James, how arc To the repented inquiries about how lie felt. Mr. Roosevelt ans- wered over arid over again "fine" and "all right." He thm went through the nar- row corridor leading to the old diplomatic reception room on the ground floor of the White House. Whrii Hie de-uble doors swung op- vii draft-Ming applause greeted the SIXTH ARMY GAINING ON NEW BRITAIN Beachhead On South Coast Is Being Consolidated By BRVDOX C. TAVES United Press Staff Correspondent Allied Advanced Headquarters, New Guinea, Dec. 17 S. Sixth Army vanguards, opening" an offensive to smash Japan's "Little Pearl Harbor" at Raba.ul, were reported officially tonight to be consolidating their Arawe beachhead on the south coast of New Britain despite vicious enemy ail; attacks. Though resistance by enemy ground forces appeared to be col- lapsing on the southwestern end of New Britain, the Japanese time and again sent waves of planes against American jungle troops, mostly Texans, fanning out from their new beachhead some 250 miles southwest of Rabaul, an of- ficial report by Gen. Douglas Mac- Arthur's headquarters revealed. All Attacks Arc Repelled Allied fighters and anti-aircraft guns successfully repelled each air attack, the report said, but the raids were continuing. An earlier communique, from MauArthur disclosed that the" American invaders Brig. Gen. Julian W. Cunningham, of San Antonio, Tex., had seized the entire Arawe "coastal while front reports said the troops had captured the three-mile long Arawe peninsula and the island network offshore in the first five hours alone. The later announcement from MacArthur's spokesman indicated all primary objectives had been attained swiftly, with the boot- shaped peninsula and the shelter- ed, mile-square Arawe harbor, un- der firm control and troops.push- ing toward the mainland to screen their holdings from a possible counterattack. Seizure of the which can be entered by winding hels between' Ausak, Kumbun, Arawe and Pilelo islands, gave Allied surface forces a base for attack -against enemy surface communication lines. Across Vitaz strait on New Guinea's Huon peninsula, Aus- tralia troops were engaged in the final assault on the Japanese out- post base at Lakona, on the coast (Continued on Page 31 CHURCHILL IS REPORTED IMPROVING LONDON, Dec. 17 (U.R) The condition of Prime Minister Win- ston Churchill is improving stead- ily, and there has been no spread of the pneumonia patch in one of his lungs, it was announced of- ficially today. A bulletin issued at No. 10 Downing street, the prime minis- ters' official residence, -said: has been no spread in the pneumonia, and the improve- ment in the prime minister's gen- eral condition has been main- tained." The British Press association reporting continued improvement in Churchill's condition, said the original announcement of his ill- ness appeared to have aroused an "unjustifiable amount of pessi- mism." Charles Parks Family Made Happy By Good hJews of Service Sons WASHINGTON, Dec. 17 iU.R- The senate today approved by voirr vole a Bo-day i-x tension of j the present subsidy ferring until utter M roc.ess action on the disputed bills to stop the subsidies. The extension resolution MOW goes to the ho panned a bill to sidy program after Dee. .'H. Tiie senate's temporary plan would eontmm- them until Fob. 20. Senate .nf tho continu- ing resolution eame after Demo- crat ie Alben W. Uarkley of Predicts Death Of In Holiday Accidents, U. S. OHICAOn. Or. 17 Th< National Safety Council predicted today that 3.700 Americans will he killed accidentally between Dec. Til. of til out trends, was lliflih tion with the Council's Christmas prediction, based on deaths e past three yen is and pres Developments of the- past few lays give promise of making this a merry Christinas in fact for Mr. and Mrs. Charles Parks of They have three sons in the .ser- vice. Kenneth ij in the army air for- ces in England and a recent let- from him states that he in i feeling fine and has just lately re- ceived a medal for efficient work. He has been overseas for a year. George, the second son. after a year in the Pa- cific area, and seeing battle ac- tion with the marines at a num- ber of places, has arrived bad: in this country for hospitalization be- cause of illness. He is now in the navy hospital at San Diego and sends word to his parents that he thinks mayhc he will be released Kentucky assured congress that! safety campaign. the present .subsidy program would not he expanded during the holiday "Ahont 2.'JO persons will be killed accidentally every day dur- ing the holiday Col. John le in conncc- j to conic home for Uie holidays, but will probably have to return to th" hospital for further treatment. Bill, the youngest son. is in the navy school at Fbig.itiifT ami S. Stillwell, Council president, said. A is 'o naye such a Aritiy UfilCer S toll in peace time, but in wartime it re.piesent.s u careless waste of a vital national resource manpow- IT." l.t. fiO] Orange ave-j He said most aeeid'.Mital deatlis 11110. reported to the sheriiVs of-' occMir in homos and that atjout fin- last night that some one had will die there during the last entered his npailmeiit and had half of December. He warned stolen about S30 worth of jewelry and S'-iO in cash. Entrance was workers, many of whom will he obsvmni; their first holiday of through the front door which was! the year at Christian, to be euro unkidteil, iH'cordiiig to the rcpija't. fill. learned that he is to to come home for a. lirint viall during the holidays. In addition. Mr. Park.s' two tors, Mrs. Olgii JiHta of 1.0s to spend in tin Parks home. "One cerium." Mr. Park'-, told fru-ndN In- Hint George In San "If can't. Ket ri-lraacij Ki com'; hnnm for til'! hnlliiuyn, wn'tv nil K'liHK to psr.k up nnd for a day ur two."   

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