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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - November 5, 1943, Yuma, Arizona                             THE WEATHEB AT TTOIA As Reported by TJ. S. Weather Bureau Highest last 21 hours....................87 Lowest last 21 hours...................49 Average high this date................SI Average low this date....................51 AND TH TINEL FORECAST to Saturday noon: Fair tonight and Saturday. Not quite so warm this afternoon. Otherwise little change. VOLUME 261 YUMA. ARIZONA FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1943 THE ARIZONA SENTINEL- VOLUME 261 REDS TAKE 2 SUBURBS OF KIEV Russians Force Now Within Five Miles of City Ky IIK.N'KV SHAl'IRO Vnitoil I'rcss Staff Correspomlenl MOSCOW, Nov. 5 A pow- erful Red army, striking out in new offensive' on the west hunk of the Dnieper river, stormed and raptured two northwestern sub- urbs of Kiev. Puslia-Voditza anci Goryanka, today. (An Exchange Telegraph dis- patch for Istanbul, quoting- Sofia reports, said the German forces evacuating the Crimea hnve be- gun to arrive on the Bulgarian Black Sea coast.) The Russian break-through brought Soviet troops nml tanks within five miles of Kiev proper anil extended the Soviet bridge- head above Liev eight miles inland from the west bank of the Dnie- per. Gross Open Ground Streaming from the forest northwest of the city, the Rus- sians smashed across open ground to seize the two towns, which lip on the main railway running north from Kiev., Only one more im- portant suburb, on the city between the Soviets and their prize. The successful thrust may be the opening blow of an offensive to roll back the Germans to Po- land's Bug river. It came while Cossacks to the south were mop- ping up the Nogiask steppes in a triumphant wind-up to the libera- tion of square entire Ukraine east of the Dnie- the Soviet summer offen- sive, which cost the Germans men in dead, wounded and prisoners. Rush Reinforcements Field reports said the Germans were draining off strength from other fronts to rush all available men and machines into frantic counterattacks north of Kiev, where 'the new assault holds a po- tential threat of splitting the Ger- man armies in Russia in two. The initial thrust yesterday overran Dimer. 22 miles north- west of Kiev, and at least seven other strongholds. More than Germans were killed and support- Ing Red Air Force planes de- stroyed or damaged 20 German tanks and trucks and silenced 28 artillery batteries. Thirty-two intercepting German planes were shot down. Russian refugees who slippei through the- German lines lasl month reported that the Axis had (Continued on Page 2) Brian Aherne Is Highest Paid Actor At Columbia Studio, Got During Last Fiscal Year PHILADELPHIA. Nov. -1 lirian Aherne, highest paid actor at Columbia Pictures Corp., re- ceived during the last fis- cal year, the company disclosed in its animal report to the Securities and Exchange commission today, Harry Cohn, president and d'i- rector, received and Wil- liam Seiter, motion picture di- rector, was paid Richard R. Deupree, president of the Procter and Gaiilblu Co., Cincinnati, and officer of various .subsidiaries, received a salary of from the parent com- pany. Floyd M. Barnes and Ren- ton K. Brodie, vice-president and officers of various subsidiaries, each received S100.000, according to Procter and Gamble's annual report. Other salaries reported to the CROWN BRANDS DE MARIGNY'S TITLE A FAKE NASSAU, Bahamas, Nov. 5 (U.R) Crown began hammering at the alibi defense of Count Alfred de Marigny in cross-examination today, seeking to break down the debonair self assurance with which rie denied in six hours of direct testimony that he murdered his multi-millionaire father-in-law, the fabulous Sir Harry Oakes. That it was going to be a battle of wits without quarter between :he pale-faced nobleman and riap- oer Attorney-General Eric Halli- nan was indicated at the very out- set when De Marigny bent over :he railing of the witness box, eager for the test. "Where did you get the name included those of the Quaker Oats Co., Chicago, who paid its board chairman, John Stuart, and its president, P.. Doug- las Stuart, each. W. L. Templeton, vice-president, received Timken-Detroit Axle Co., De- troit, paiil its president, Walter F. Rockwell, its vice-presi- dent, R. J. Goldift, and its board chairman, Willard F. Rock- well. Trouper Costello Gives Broadcast Despite Tragedy By FKKDKKICK OTHMAN United Press Stuff Correspondent HOLLYWOOD, Nov. 5 Costello's party for his son's first birthday, to signalize the roly-poly comic's emergence from a slough of hard luck, turned today into a funeral service. The infant. Lou Costello, Jr., drowned in the family swimming pool three hours before his father brushed the tears from his eyes and lauched, as loud as lie could, on a coast-to-coast radio broad- cast. The program, replete with jokes which took on a macabre tinge for those few listeners who knew of the tragedy at the pool, fea- tured Costcllo and his long-time partner. Bud Abbott. It was their first since Hard Luck Lou became critically ill with pheumatic fever last March. The broadcast last night at NBC studios was to have been a gala event. Then Costello's doctor, Vic- tor Kovcner. phoned him ahout the baby's breaking out of its crib, crawling to the edge of the pooi and falling in; about the firemen diving for the child and working in vain for an hour and a half to revive him. Lou slumped in his chair. His cigar went out. Rivnl comedians, including Bob Hope. Red Skclton, Jimmy Dnrnntc and Mickey Roo- ney. heard the news. All offered to go on in Lou's place. By now, Dr. Kovener, who once despaired of Costello's life, hud reached the studio. He and Abbott decided it would be best for Coslcllp to his nppoarnucc. "Better thnu letting the poor guy sit at home, with the little1 of De Marigny T" Hallinan asked. Is Mother's Name It's my mother's De Afarigny replied. "My father's lame was Fauquereaux. My moth- er and father were divorced when was a child. T lived with my :ather but when I first saw my nother when I was eighteen she asked me to use her name." Hallinan parried quickly, ask- ng: "How did you get the title of Count' "I have never called myself, 'Count.' the defendant replied calmly. "But 1 inherited the title from botli sides of my family. My former wife (liuth Fahnestock de Marigny) called hcrscl 'Countess de Marigny.' When I arrived in Nassau T asked the newspapers not to use it ever in Nassau or any place else." "Fauquereaux is a botirgeoise Hallinan saici. Is Undisturbed DC Marigny was undisturbed this attack on the authenticity of his title. He said it was the name of a titled family of the British island of Mauritius where he was born. "The title is a fake." Hallinan commented. Warner Testifies He Feared Bioff And His Gang NEW YORK, Nov. 5 bert Warner, vice-president and treasurer of Warner Brothers Pic- tures. Inc.. testified today that while he feared violence from Wil lie Bioff, convicted extortionist, he decided against informing police authorities because he believed others in Bioff's gang would re- taliate. Testifying at the trial of eight men accused of extorting more than from the picture industry, Warner said that the industry was "so fragile" in when George E. Browne and Bioff were operating their union racket that a Vstrike of even a few days would have ruined us." Asked by James D. C. Murray of defense counsel why he had not gone to the FBI or other law en- forcement agencies, Warner said that he believed that even if Bioff were removed, the "others would carry on." He paid Bioff, he said, install- ments of each over a period of two years, for a total of Warner said the arrangement was "so obnoxious" to him that he never paid Bioff directly, but left the cash with his secretary for Bioff to pick up. Norman Adair Undergoes Operation ONLY 70 VOTERS HAVE RE-REGISTERED Only 70 of the 1377 cancelled registrations for voting have been received up to this morning, ac- cording to the reports in the office of James T. Hodges, city recorder. Mr. Hodges said today that unless the rate of registration is speeded up considerably there will either a last minute rush that will be hard to handle in his office or many cit- izens will he ineligible to vote at the Dec. 21 special election. Of a previous registration of 2-135 only voted at the elec- tion held Oct. 27 1912. Under the ,aw failure 'ampliation to vote constitutes a of the registration ind the voter must renew the reg- stration. The final date fnr regis- tration before the Dec. 21 election is Nov. 22. The proposition to be voted on Dec. 21 is a proposed chnnge in the city charter whereby the office of chief of police shall be appointive nstead of elective as now pro- vided. Norman Adair. auditor for the E. F. Sanguinetti organization, .mderwent an operation yesterday at the Loma Linda (Calif.) hos- lital. Mrs. Adair, who is with lim, informed friends he was rest- ng well this morning. He was stricken ill two weeks ago quite suddenly, and after a thorough check of his condition an opera- tion was deemed necessary. Committee Named .By F. R. to Probe Costing of Living WASHINGTON. Nov. 5 President Roosevelt today appoint- ed five members of the War Labor board, representing industry, la- bor and the public, as a special committee to investigate the cost of living and report within 60 days. Labor organizations have com- plained that the labor depart- FIFTH ARMY ADVANCES SEVEN MILES Crosses Flooded Plains Tc Mouth Of Garigiiano River U.V 1IAUK1SOX SALISBURY United Press Staff Correspondent ALLIED H EADQUARTERS, Algiers, Nov. 5 ican Fitth army troops completed the smashing of the German "Lit- tle Rommel" line today by swarm- ing across flooded plains to the mouth of the Garigiiano river as a concerted advance sent Allied forces forward all across Italy on the march to Rome. Driving forward seven miles on the western end of the front from Isernia to the sea, the troops reached the south bank of the Gar- igiiano to strike the forward bar- rier to the new Nazi defenses in high ground to the north. Yanks Cross Volturno' In the center. American forces crossed the upper Volturno and fought their way into the outskirtfe of Venafro, last enemy bastion on the old line, and cut off the escape of the German garrison there by seizing Vallecupa on the road to Cassino. British Eighth army troops, blasting back German tank forces, won San Salvo, beyond the Trighp river on the Adriatic with aid of a naval bombardment. Nazis Digging in Official reports said the Ger- mans, who flooded the Gangliaho plains trying vainly to impede the Fifth's surge, were digging into the southern slopes of the Aurun- ci mountains across the river for a stand that may rival that on the Volturno above Naples. It was indicated that the new line may force the Allies to resort again to hard but small punches seeking out holes before beginning a new general attack. More than a score of towns and villages were reached or passed in the general advance; including Carpinone, Acquevive, Pettoranel- lo. San A'gapito, Monteruduni, Ca- priati, Cirolano, Fontegreca, Torre E Pincilli, and Conca. The toughest battles on the line ivere fought by the British to win Isernia, 13 miles northeast of Ven- LLOYDS DENIES BETS MADE WAR TO END IN 3 WEEKS LONDON, Nov. 5 sentatives of Lloyds today de- scribed as "entirely without foun- dation" reports that wagers had been made through the associa- tion of underwriters that the j European phase of the war would be over in three weeks. For several years Lloyds has refused to permit its be used for transactions which virtually amount to wagers. It was pointed out that it would be almost impossible for the under- writers who make up Lloyds to have any collective opinion on the possible duration of the war. Members of the United Press staff here have not heard of any private bets being made on whether the war would be over in three weeks. President Says Agreement Reached At Chungking Parley for Joint Operations in Campaign Against Japs afro and San Salvo, where, tanks fought in the. streets! Phoenix Firm Gets Federal Contract PHOENIX, Johnson Mfg. Ariz., Nov. 5 5 JAPANESE WARSHIPS ARE SUNK Three Others Are Damaged In Fight Off Bougainville By BBYDON C. TAVES United Press Staff. Correspondent ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, Southwest Pacific, ..Nov.. 5 Nine Japanese warships were sent to the bottom or damaged Monday night when U. S. naval guns smashed an enemy attempt to halt the Bougainville invasion, a com- munique reported today. The toll was based on prelimin- ary reports of the 90 minute bat- tle, indicating it may turn out to be an even greater American vic- tory when full details are dis- closed. Not an American vessel was lost although .some were damagec and there were casualties in the fight which took place only 40 miles off the beachhead won on Bougainville, northernmost of the Solomons, by U. S. Marines only 12 hours before. 17 Planes Downed A previous communique had dis closed the engagement but gave no details. It was fought while transports were still unloading off Bougainville: The next day the warships brought down 17 of 6" Japanese planes that attacked them. (Berlin broadcast a Tokyo dis- patch which apparently referred to the same engagements. It said i "heavy damage" was inflicted on WASHINGTON'. Nov. 5 (U.fil- I President Roosevelt said today that an American-British-Chincse conference in Chungking had reached complete agreement on joint operations carried-out in the forthcoming continental campaign against Japan. Describing the results of the conference as bad news for Japan, the President said the meeting brought together Lord Louis Mounbatten, supreme commander fabricators of sheet metal and steel, was award- ed a contract for the manufacture of Victory Ship parts, D. L. Bouse, district man- ager of the Smaller War Plants Corp., announced today. GOP Candidate Wins Kentucky Governorship FRANKFORT, Ky., Nov. 5 (U.R) An official count of ballots in Tuesday's Kentucky elections be- gan today after complete unoffic- U. S. Senator Ernest W. McFar- i to-... land of Arizona will speak tonight ments cost of living index does J not trulv reflect incrc-iscd prices' lal retllrns Save Republican Si- beginning at MWT on the not trulj reflect mci cased prices mcon s. Willis the govcrnship with cording to a telegram received by a majority of 8066. i adjusted compensation bill, ac- .'the American fleet units.but gave no details and said "more than the Bougainvilie landing force had been wiped out and a "large number" of landing craft were sunk.) 5 Ships Are Sunk Twelve. Japanese ships, includ- ing four cruisers and eight de- stroyers, took part in the fight. One cruiser and four destroyers 'were sunk and two cruisers (Continued on Page and SEN. McFARLAND TO GIVE RADIO ADDRESS TONIGHT parity between creases and wag able under the living costs in- e increases allow- Little Steel" for- WL6 Expected to Vote Today on Miners' Contract WASHINGTON, Nov. 5 The War Labor board expected to rule today on the wage contract for miners negotiated by Coal Administrator Harold L. Ic- kes and John L. Lewis. The board discussed the agree- ment for six hours yesterday and for several hours again today but did not, as it had previously an- nounced it would, take a vote dur- ing the forenoon. Board members said, however, they expected to vote later today. Meanwhile, the miners were slowly returning to the pits al though there is no hope of com plete resumption of production un til next week. Many miners are holding out until the WLB ap proves the new contract Inasmuch as the. contract appeared lo meet the condi- tions set by the board in its Illinois decision last week, it was believed that debate among board members in- volved the validity of an agreement negotiated during a strike. When President Roosevelt seized the mines Monday night, he auth- orized Ickes to offer the miners a contract based on the WLB deci- sion. Ickes and Lewis negotiated the agreement Tue'sday and Wednesday while the United Mine Workers' three-day general strike was in progress. The TJMW policy committee called off the strike at the same time that it ratified the agreement. for southeastern Asia; Lieut. Gen Joseph L. Stilwell, Maj. Gen Claire Chennault, and Lieut. Gen Brehon E. Somervell, commande of the American army supply 1'arley Successful These men, the President said conferred will Generalissimo Chi ang Kai-Shek and Chinese mill tary leaders, and the results wen extremely successful. He said there was completi agreement by the three nations on the method of handling tbj continental campaign against the Japanese in the Far Bast. Explaining that Somervell has already returned to Washington Mr. Roosevelt said his presence t the Chungking meeting ob viously concerned supplies for tlv (Continued on Page 3) ANNULMENT OF SONORA MARRIAGE ASKED IN SUIT Ada Louise Steiert, in an action brought by her guardian ad litem filed yesterday, asks annulment of her marriage to William C. Steiert at San Luis, Sonora, Mex., on July 27, 1913. The complaint alleges that both the parties to the marriage were 17 years old at the time and for that reason ceremony was null and void. Guardian ad litem appointed by Judge Henry C. Kelly is the plaintiff's mother, Ada-Lee Raley. The plaintiff is now living at the home of her parents in Yuma and her husband is in the army. She asks that her maiden name, Louise Raley be restored. Ada the department's index. The President said the commit- tee would comprise WLB Chair- man William .H. Dnvis, represent- ing the public; George Meany, secretary-treasurer of the Ameri- can Federation of Labor, and R. J. Thomas, president of the United Automobile Workers repre- senting labor; and H. B. Horton, treasurer of the Chicago Bridge and Iron Co., and George K. Bait, vice-president of Dugnn Brothers, Newark, dustry. N. J., representing in- follow in the explained. nthcr Abbot Reports Screen Cut By Prowler In Attempt to Enter The sheriff's office and the city police are investigating n report by L. M. McCrorcy, 130 Sixth Ave. that a prowler had cut the screen on the porch of his home in an at- tempt to enter the place. MIDWINTER TAX CONFERENCE SET FOR DECEMBER 3 PHOENIX. Ariz., Nov. 5 (U.RI-- The state tax commission today set December 3, the date for the aniiunl midwinter tax conference witli county assessors and mem- bers of boards of supervisors. The session, devoted to determining minimum values and uniform methods of assessing property throughout the state, will be held in the commission's chambers at the .state capilol. Willis received votes and his Democratic opponent, J. Lyter Donaldson, 170.152, according unofficial returns. to the Daily Sun from the senator. The address v'.ll he carried over the Yuma he said. radio station, KYUM. Chinese Cut 100 Miles Into Burma, Constructing New China Supply Road It. Tom Harmon Again Reported Missing in Action FRENCH GROUP WANTS VOICE IN ALLIED PARLEYS ALGIERS, Nov. 5 French National Committee of Liberation announced today that France will not consider herself bound by any Anglo-American- Russian decisions affecting Ger- many unless her representatives are allowed a voice in deciding those issues. In a blunt bid for an equal place with the three major allies on the newly-created Europeon commission the French commit- tee implied that any armistice ar- ranged by their allies with Ger- many might not be regarded as binding on French armies. Communique Issued "The committee must make it known that decisions which could be taken on this subject would only bind France if she participated in them under conditions in formity with her interest and those of all her allies, and corresponding to the sacrifices she herself has made in the common a communi- que said. The committee, headed jointly by Gens. Henri Honore Giraud and Charles de Gaulle, said its stand had been prompted by recent statements issued after the Mos- cow conference of American, Brit- ish, and Russian foreign ministers. The European" commission which ,vill meet in London to consider all problems arising from the war with Germany was formed at that meeting and limited lo the three major powers. EDITOR'S NOTE: United Press War Correspondent Frank Hewlitt has arrived in Burma to cover Al- lied operations in that theater. A veteran of the Philippine cam- paign, who. with the aid of his wife, Virginia, scored a notable beat with his story of the Japanese aerial attack on the open city of Manila, he was the only newsman to witness the fall of Hainan. He escaped to Corregidor, was re- moved to Australia by an Amer- ican bomber during a surprise at- tack on Japanese positions in the Philippines, and covered the Amer- ican and Australian jungle cam- paign in New Guinea and the Solo- mons. His coverage from Bataau won him a National Headlincr's club award for outstanding journ- alistic achievement in 19-12. His wife was interned by the Japanese. On his way to Burma he stopped at Portuguese India, where the recent exchange of Jap- anese and American internees took place, in the hope tiiat his wife was among them. But she was not, and he proceeded to Burma. His first dispatch from that theater follows. By FRANK HEWKTT United Press Staff Correspondent WITH ALLIED FORCES. Northern Burma, (No Date Given) spearheads, plunging 100 miles into Burma to cut open ANN ARBOR, Mich., Nov. 5 (U.R secretary of war desires to express regret at this time that your son, Lt. Thomas D. Harmon is missing in action." This was the second time in seven months that Mr. and Mrs I Louis A. Harmon were advisee that their All-American son, Tom- my Harmon, was lost in air action He caino back the first April -but today the odds were heavy against him. This time the former University of Michigan gridiron hero had not been on a transit mission. .He had been as- signed to the 1-lth Air Force in China, piloting a Pl-tO pursuit plane against the Japanese. He a path for a new supply road to China, moved south today to battle the Japanese for control of the broad Hukawng valley. The thrust coincided with a visit by Lieut. Gen. Joseph W. Stilwell, American commander in the China-Burma-Indin theater, who expressed satisfaction the progress made thus far in building the new Burma rond. (Hewlett's dispatch indicated (Continued on Page G) teen missing since Oct. the war department said. Harmon's mother, who "was sure Tom would come back" when it was announced April M that her sou and his ercw were miss- ing from M crash in the Caribbean aren. again refused to abandon hope. didn't lose courage during those diiys In April when we heard she said, "and we won't believe that he has not come out on top this time." JURY FINDS FOR DEFENDANT IN MOUSE CASE The jury found for the defendant in the mouse-in-a-drink case in su- pEriac-COiirl yesterday afternoon. Alter deliberating 20 minutes the jury brought in the verdict which field the Southwestern Ice and Cold Storage company blameless the action brough by Harry Gaffney and ins wife, Frances Gaffney for damages alleged :o have been sustained when the alter plaintiff found a mouse in i bottle of Coca Cola which she purchased at a local store. The complaint asked for damages. THREE ARMY JEEPS REPORTED STOLEN YANKS RAID IMPORTANT NAZI TARGET Fighter Planes Accompany Bombers All fhc Way By J. EDWARD MUKKAy United X'ress Staf Correspondent LONDON, Nov. 'o fleets of Flying Fortresses and Liberators, lashing out in the United States Eighth Air .Force's second record assault in three days, penetrated Germany's most heavily-defended area today and delivered a smashing blow at an "mportant target. Never before had any force of day bombers even approaching comparable size struck at an in- terior target in Germany. Up- ward of heavy bombers and fighters struck at the Reich on. Wednesday. The raiding force by German fighters almost from, the moment it crossed the coast of the continent until it had de- livered its bomb load and .reached the sea on the way back. Accompanied By Fighters Today's raid-was different from: previous attacks on the interior of ermany. Long range fighter of Lightnings.and able to go all the way with the bombers. A headquarters announcement of the attack said it was aimed at western Germany. First reports from the crewmen indicated the anti-aircraft fire was hea'vy over the. targets. But they said the fighters provided magnifi- cent protection against 'the.-Nazi attackers, keeping most .of theni away from the bomber formations; Many Dogfights Occur Many dogfights occurred .along :he raiding route, and .'.several German fighters were shot down. Fortress and Liberator losses were considered reasonable in view of the opposition. But. the .vhat higher than that of'the Wil- lelmshaven raid Wednesday, -when only five bombers were lost." A coastal observer reported that 'big air operations are going on" over the Straits of Dover. Sev- eral flights passed inbound 'rom tile continent after going out by another route. Most of the planes were hidden the clouds, but experienced vatchers said the thunder of mo- :ors apparently included those of heavy bombers. Spitfire fighters darted back and forth at lower evcls. Mosquitoes Active Light Mosquito, bombers of the Royal Air Force carried" the of- ensive through the night, attack- western Germany while Dus- eldori smouldered from a heavy aid in which Swiss reports said ,000 persons were killed. Though only light bombers par- (Continued on Page 2) Believe Turkey May Grant Air Bases to Allies Three army jeeps have been re- ported taken within the last 2-t hours, according to the record at the sheriff's office. The first loss was reported by the military po'- lice at midnight last night when one of the cars was taken from the parking lot near the city hall. It was identified as being marked with "A--I" on the left side and "2-93-E" on the right side. The loss of the other two was reported soon after the first. One had the word "Buck" printed on the sine in yellow letters. No iden- tification marks the second. were given for Daily Temperatures By UMTKI) York Ihicago it. IjOUiS tlinneapolis ienttle Denver 'hocnix High 55 5-1 07 W fill 76 42 By WILLIAM J5. DICKINSON United Press Staff Correspondent LONDON. Nov. 5 matic sources speculated today that Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden's conferences with Turkish Foreign Minister Numan Mencm- encioglu in Cairo may result in Turkey opening the Dardanelles and granting air bases tu the I Allies. i Eden arrived in Cairo yesterday and was expected to begin his talks with Menemcncioglu and Sir Hughe Knatchhull-Hugess'en, Brit- ish ambassador to Turkey, mo- mentarily. Though U. S. Secre- tary cif State Cnrdell Hull left Moscow at the same time as Eden, there was no authoritative word whether he would participate in the conferences. Etlen'.s primary mission will b't to acquaint Mcnemenrioglu with the decisions reached at the Mos- cow conference as they affect Turkey's sphere of interest and it was believed possible that thi: Cairo meetings would bring im- plementation of the Britlsh- French-Turkish. mutual assistance pact of IflliO. This conceivably could mean the opening of the Danluiu-llcH and the granting of air basen to the AllU'H to speed the ferrying of supplied to Russia and to facilltale an Allied campaign in the Ai-g'-an. With trm Allies in Turkish the Ger- man positions in Find (ho aneHe probably would be- come quickly untenable and way would In: opi-ii lor an Alliwj i thrust into the Halk.-imi.   

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