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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: March 26, 1943 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - March 26, 1943, Yuma, Arizona                             TUB WKATIIEtt AT I'll MA rrpurtnl U. 8. Weather Bureau Highest last 2-t hours ...............90 Lowest last -1 hours ................52 Average high this date...............SO Average low this date ................51 AND TH TINEL KOKECAST tu Saturday noon: Maxiiiiuni temperatures today near W. Mot much change tonight. VOLUME NUMBER MARCH ARIZONA NUMBER 72 8TH ARMY ADVANCES INTO MARETH LINE REDS SEIZE INITIATIVE IN UKRAINE Take Village On Kharkov Front, 2 Near Belgorod KV IIU.NKY SH.U'IKO United Press Staff Correspondent MOSCOW, March 26 Red armies have broken into a village on the Kharkov front, ousted the Germans from two briefly-held hamlets near Belgorod and thrust deeper into the axis defense belt before Smolensk, the Soviets an- nouneed today. Seizing- the initiative for the first time in several days on the Kharkov front. Russian patrols burst into a German-occupied town north of Chugucv, the mid-day Communique said. One lieutenant alone killed six German soldiers and one officer. Kegiment Kcpulsi-d Only yesterday, the Germans threw an infantry 20 tanks into an al- tiick against a strategic height held by the Russians in the same urea, only to fall back with a loss of seven tanks and five self-pro- pelling guns and heavy casualties. Soviet artillery was credited with breaking- up another1 German ut- tuck north of Chuguev yesterday. More than 200 enemy dead were counted on the battlefield, the (Continued on IJage 2) Carnival Family Reports Girl, 15, Is Missing Sheriffs deputies hist night in- vestigated a report of a missing .10 year old girl, feared by her mother to have been kidnaped from Urn carnival operating- south of the city limits. The girl belongs family of trapeze performers with the car- nival. Last night she took part in a performance and then went to the family's living quarters to to rest until the next show. She was not seen around tile carnival again and when time came for the next show to go on she could not be found. The girl is described as being five feet tall, weight about 110 pounds, blue eyes, light brown fair complexion, wears glasses, had on :i plaid skirt, a maioon sweater, a brown cordu- roy jacket, white street sandals ami white sox. Army Bombers Raid Kiska Four Times in Day WASHINGTON. March (U.B --Army heavy and medium bomb- ers slashed at Kisfci in the Alcu- tians four times on Wednesday, the navy announced today. Beyond saying; that hils were scored in the target area, the navy provided no details. All our planes returned lo their base. These raids raised to 25 the to- tal number of air attacks on that .Japanese base this month. 123 To Graduate From 8th Grade Here May 20th Approximately 12X pupils will ivciMvr diplomas ;iL the Yuina cit> demon tary .schuuls' commence ment exercises on May 20th a I p.m. in the auditorium of .tht Fourth Avenue schoul, it was an- nouncuil tariny by Supt. C. W. Me- Grnw. This is slightly more than last year. Speakers will include: Gene- viuve. Turnac, valedictorian; Betty Lou Column, salutaloiian; Lily Gk'L'Kon. Billy Berry, Lois Domes and Marilyn Blalack. Eight pupils will graduate from the colored school on the; night of May 19th, also in the auditor- ium of the Fourth Avenue school. Speakers were announced as fol lows: Audrey Lee Summers, vale- dictorian; Valdiercsu Crisp, salut- atoriau, Prince Eddings and Mild- red Lee. Kiwanis Official Is Speaker at Club Luncheon Yuma Kimanians and their la- dies and other guests were honored to have their international presi- dent. Fred G. McAlister, as their speaker at the regular luncheon meeting at Clymer's yesterday. Mr. McAlister, a prominent at- torney and business man of Lon- don, Ontario, and Mrs. McAlister spent two days here before going on to the coast and enjoyed the brief respite from the more rigor- ous weather of their homeland at this time of year. Carll Huskison, president of the local club presided at yesterday's meeting. He introduced Myron In- sko. lieutenant governor of this division, and Tom Core, governor of the California and Nevada dist- rict of which Yuma is a part. Mr. Gore introduced Mr. MAlistcr. "The weapons we have at was the topic used by Mr. McAlis- ter in his inspiring talk. Visiting Kiwunians were present from Riverside. LaJnlln, Calcxieo, San Diego, National City, El Cen- tro, Ocean Beach, La Mesa and Fullerton, California. Soldier Convicted Of Rape Hanged At Tucson Air Base ARMY CADET IS KILLED IN CRASH Plane Crashes On Mesa Shortly Before 11 P.M. E. Dwight Linkey, 27, aviation cadet at the Yuinu army air field, was killed last night shortly be- fore o'clock when his plane crashed on the mesa in the vicin- ity of county street and Ave- nue B on a routine flight, it was announced by the public re- lations department of the air base this morning. He was alone in the plane and on a routine training flight. Linkey's wife and parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Linltoy. live at On- tario, Calif., his former home. Culls Sheriffs Office First intimation of disaster hav- ing overtaken one of the cadets came from Oscar Morris, who lives in the area where the plane crashed. He telephoned the office of Sher- iff T. H. Newman at that it seemed to him the plane up" while in the ,air and then fell about three quarters of a mile east of his place. Officers at I he air base were notified and Sheriff Newman and a deputy accompanied the search- ing party which soon located the wrecked plane. Where Tunisia Battle Rages TUCSON, Ariz., March 20 (U.m Pvt Francis E. Lines, Mich., convicted of rape before a court martial at Davis-Monthan Field Oct. U, was hanged today nt the local airbase. Lines was pronounced dead 10 minutes after the trap was sprung. He was well controlled to the last. In his final statement he ad- vised soldiers to avoid hard liquor and stay away from young girls. Lines wag convicted of attack- ing n girl Aug. 11 after forcing her by threats to precede him in- to a railroad box car. He was picked up 20 minutes Intel- by military police. After the court martial his case was tcviewed by the judge advo- cate of tile Second Air Force, who turned it over to the secretary of war. Tlie sentence finally was ap- proved by President Roosevelt before the execution was ordered. Battle Tested American Troops Standing Firm Against Axis Near E! Guettar and East of Maknassy Ity C. K. CUNMNCII.-UI Ignited Stuff ('orri'spundi'iil WITH THE AMKIUCAN FIRST DIVISION ON THIS SOUTH- CENTRAL, FRONT, Tunisia, Mnr. (Delayed) Ballle-tcsled American Iroops are standing firm againsl all axis attempts to disclose them from their nev.-ly- won positions below R1 Guetlar and east of Alaknassy. The Americans hurled hack n light (inemy infantry att.aek on Iheir positions on the north vhoulder of Djebel Herda. south of El Gueltar. tost night after smashing n Panzer thrust Tues- day. German planes twice bombed Mnknassy early todiiy, presum- ably in prcpn riilinn for another ground assault. Reports reached us yesterday AFL Official Urges Suspension Of Wagner Act WASHINGTON, Mnrch 2H (U.R) P. Frcy, president of the AFL Metal Trades council, pro- posed today that the Wagner Act suspended for the duration so that tho National Labor Relations board could not order collective mrgaining elections. Testifying1 before ihe senn tc Truman committee on jnrisdic- .ional disputes between his unions nd the CIO in the west coa.st Kaiser shipyards, Frcy asserted hat NLRB elections frequently lave a dismptive effect on morale on workers. "Speaking for myself he ssiid, "T believe it would be more ndvjintagv.ous to management and Inbor to suspend the Wagner Act for the duration of the war. It is most unfortunate to have two fcdrrjil agcneies making decisions in the labor field during the war." FOUM TATAHOUINE Swiftly moving forces are attacking and counter-attacking in a climactic battle for southern Tunisia. Along the Nazi-held Mareth Line, Axis counter-blows have beaten back the British Eighth Army, which had made a break-through between Mareth and the Gulf of Gabes, while nt the lower end a sweeping British movement threatened to encircle the enemy as it turned toward Gabes, south of El Hamma. In the central sector two American drives continued against Mczzouna and Gabes de- spite increasing pressure of German and Italian units. BELIEVE HITLER HAS RESERVE OF ONE TO TWO MILLION TROOPS TO COMBAT ALLIED EUROPEAN INVASION IJY IIAKK1SON SALISIUJKV United FITHS Stuff Correspondent LONDON, March 126 Hitler has a "strategic reserve" of at least Eible to in an emergency which to combat any An- jlo-American invasion .of Europe, Allied observers estimated today. The straightening of the axis lino in Russia under pressure of .he Soviut winter offensive will release man, those sour- ces said, and twice that number could be spared should the Ger- mans decide to shorten their lines further or go completely on the defensive along the length of the Eastern front. Time Will Tell What use Hitler will nuiku of tin's strategic reserve will be dc- lorminctl by the events, of the next (Continued on Page 4) Governor Vetoes Law Extending Hours Women May Work PHOENIX, March 26 (U.R) Gov. Sidney P. Osboni yesterday cleared his desk of bills from the 16t.li Legislature which ended 10 days ago. T'hc governor signal the Colo- rado River bill, another provid- ing restrictions on mutual benefit insurance corporations, and veto- ed a bill which would have re- moved for the duration and six months application of the 48-hour week for women in war work. Osborn said he vetoed the hill because the work limitation, a health measure, was as necessary in war an peace; because longer hours would increa.se absentee- ism: because immediate need has not been .shown: and because wo- men would be discouraged from seeking war work. Elks Put On Yellow Dog Initiation At El Centra Fifteen members nf the Yuma I'llk.s lodge went to Ki Cmlro hist, evening where they attended M regular initiation .singed by the California lodgomon. in the evening tht1 Yum- an.s initiated a. largu class into the mysteries of the Yellow Dog or- der. A spaghetti dinner, served Ttal- inn style, was furnished by the Pace Bill Recommitted by Senate To Committee For Further Study; Action Seen as Victory for Administration WASHINGTON. Afcircli lU.R) today by vwet; vote recommitted the Pact; bill, which would include farm costs in the farm parity funmila, t.n its agriculture committee for further .stmiy. The aetimi was ;i victory for the administration, which felt Price Administrator Prcnliss At. Brown had warned congressional leaders yesterday that enactment of the hill and the Baukhcad measure forbidding deduction of federal benefit payments in com- puting parity, would add more than to the na- tion's annual food bill and in- that the I'arc lull would bn a vile destruction of the "Little threat to its economic stahilixa- Steel" ceiling formula, tion program, j (Continued on PaSe 2) Allied Airmen Strike Hard at Jap Bases in South Pacific and Burma U.NITK1) I'KESS The Allies pushed harassing air blows at enemy airdromes and con- centrations in Ihe Pacific area to- day, seeking to choke off Japanese ability lo renew Ihe offensive, re- ports from llu- various sectors in- dicaled today. Gen. Douglas .MacArlhur's com- munique for the Auslraliau area told of a smashing raid yesterday by Liberator bombers on Ihe vital Japanese base at Rabaul. on New Britain island north of .N'ew Uui- i nea. A two-hour attack- .second in three big fires on the waterfront. The bombs included many onc-tomiers. I.uc. Hard Hit Lac and Salamana on Xcw Guin- j ea also were hit hard as were nth- I enemy positions along the de- FOOD CHIEF TO FORM LAND ARMY President Says Group Will Aid Farm Production BY FRED BAILEY United Press Staff Correspondent WASHINGTON, March 26 President Roosevelt today said one of the first tasks of the new food administrator, Chester C. Davis, will be to establish some sort of land army, to assist in farm pro- duction. Mr. Roosevelt made it plain that Davis will completely replace Sec- retary of Agriculture Claude R. Wickard as boss of the nation's food program. Mr. Roosevelt explained thai while Wickard will have all of the authority and duties lie had be- fore he was made food adminis- trator last December, Davis will have complete authority over food distribution ami production. He said this will include the establish- ment of farm price ceilings, but that in this respect Davis will act in cooperation with the Office of Price Administration. Oppnscd By Kami Groups This joint responsibility regard- ing farm prices lias been assailed by farm organization leaders and many members of e.ongress from (Continued on Page 3) Colored Man Is Held To Answer Charge of Rape Robert GO, colored man charged with nipo; 'brought into Judge R. IT. Lutes' justice of the peace court this morning, a preliminary hearing WHS held, and the defendant was held to answer to superior court, with bond fixed at 51.000. Tlu: incident. landing up to the filing a by a colored woman is alleged to have taken place hist .Sunday afternoon at the woman's home south of the 10th .street road south of town. She was present in the court- room this morning and testified Unit .she hud the de- fendant before last Saturday when lie came to her home and rented :l I'OOlll. Batw> is reported to have come here Saturday from Eloy. Sheriff T. H. Newman, the only other witness, said that he had received from Phoenix a report on fingerprint record and that tin? record he hud been ar- led a number of times before and had served months of a five year term in Texas on a rape charge. Program For Soldier Show Here Tonight Program for the ,'J6lth Infantry Regimental orchestra's show to I be presented in the Yuma Union high school auditorium tonight be-1 ginning at was announced this I noon by Newton "Carolina" Brun- son, who is to be master of cere- monies. The show and the concert to he .presented by the regimental band in front of the Fourth Avenue school tomorrow evening at arc under auspices of the Yuma county war savings staff. Admis- sion to the show tonight will be through purchase at the door of war stamps, 25 cents for students and 50 cents for adults; the pur- chasers to keep the stamps. War (Continued on Page 3) FIGHTING IS DESCRIBED AS FIERCE All Other Sectors Quiet Pending Battle's Outcome Chiang fcnse arc mirth of Australia. Two (Continued mi Page 4) TODAY'S WAR MOVES Madame Predicts New China to Arise By JOAN YO UN UK It United Press Staff Correspondent SAN FRANCISCO, March 20 Chiang Kai-Shek pledgee.! lo America loday Ihe friendship of a new China which "will rise from Ihe ashes" of ils long war with Japan like the mythical Phoenix, symbol of im- morlalily. Five lliousand smiling residents of Young China of Ihe Wesl ap- plauded tile pledge of the eo- leadcr of as she spoke from a balcony overlooking Ihe cily hall plaza in Ihiii "Gateway to the home of Amer- ica's largest Chinatown. San turned out far Hie- greatest crowd, Chinese and Occiilenluls aliko, (o greet MudiMiic Chiang so far on her long lour of the country. She wax visibly touched by I lie weleume. "The new China we arc build- ing will rise from the ashes and :t will he a friend of she said. "China, like HID Phoe- nix, will rise again. As I stand in your mklsl my mind flies back lo lhe civic square at'Shanghai, finished just before the war and now in ruins." Chrislening the Liberty ves- sel Sun Yat-Sen by Madame Wei Pao-Ming, wife of the Chinese ambasadur to America, in behalf of AHadame Chiang, was the high- light of today's schedule. To- night she plans to appear at banquet in lier honor. l.ONUON, March 26 Kudiu Algiers said today that the British Eighth army was developing its offensive against the Maretli line despite stiff opposition and that American forces in South- Central Tunisia were pushing toward the sea. A British column which flanked the Maretli lino was reported to be attacking in the El Ifainma sector, Radio Al- giers said, but it was not clear whether enemy positions had been penetrated. By VIRGIL PINKLEY United Press Staff Correspondent A.ULIED HEADQUARTERS North Africa, March 26 The British Eighth arnfy, throw- ing a frontal assault against the Maroth line, has advanced deeper into Marshal Erwin Rommel's po- sitions while fighting died down along the rest of. the Tunisian front pending the outcome Of the batlle in the north. (Radio Algiers.and Radio Mor- rocco, both sponsored by the lies, described the JMareth linel- (Continued on Page 2) Governor Signs Colorado River Contract Bill Red Tape Charged By Metals Firm In Suit Against OPA r. S. I'iil, Offiee) ll.V I.OCIS KKK.MI.i: lulled Press War AnalyM Marshal Krwin Rommel bus shown such strength in tlie defense of his .Marelh line positions ihal n different aspect is being pill on (he question of j how long it will take tn drive the' axis out of Tunisia. Rommel had not been expected to make a real stand on the line because of the grave, danger of rueiieU'inenl which might rust h.m the of his Afrikn korps. lie appears to have weighed and discounted till1; dim- Kcr for the time II woiilil lie uiilc of tin- mark lo MippuM' thai Kom- MH'I elccletl to make his final .stand at iMan-lh. is InciiiK' a superior Itrilish KiKhtli army, lias inadequate air support anil is threatened Allied columns from llu- wr.st and northwest. If he persists in fighting to a decision at Mareth, a crushing de- feat probably wouid result and the backbone of axis resistance in TuniHia would be broken. The op- eration of cleaning out the (Continued on Page Gov. Vivian Of Colorado Orders Draft Deferments DKNVKH. Colo., March 2I> (U.R) John C. Vivian said today In- would "stick to my guns" and "ppo.se any challenge questioning liis right to order the blanket de- fi-rmelit of Colorado farm work- The Republican governor's un- precedented order developed into a test, .il authority a.s dig. (it'll, iranilil H. Uichantson. state selec- tive service director, announced that In- would forward Vivian's directive lo Cen. Lewis IS. I ii-rshry, national head of selec- j live .set vice. Richardson s.iid that meanwhile hf would direct Colorado draft boards "tn c'liitiuue the present policy s.-lc-clion of ag- ricultural workers for militaryj duly." "They an- operating under or- ders from Wii.'Jningtoii." Richard- son said, "and those orders do not call for blanket deferiiienl of farm workers, roach case is stud- j li'il individually anil the (million of defeimenl or selection rests wholly on whellier the individual is regularly engaged in an activ- ity necessary to nn agricultural occupation." PHOKN1X, March 26 Sidney p. Osboni announced loday lie has signed Senate Bill. No. 72, authorizing a contract with the secretary of interior for use of Colorado river water from the Boulder Canyon project. The. governor emphasized in adi accompanying statement that the act "does not ratify the .Colorado River Compact. It authorizes the signing of a contract with the1 secretary of the inlerior for all the water frojn tile Colorado riv- er to which Arizona is entitled under the law." Will Ilulify Compact It provides that when the con- tract is signed, and approved by tile legislature and the governor, a will be ratified, j Kxplaining necessity for the j the governor said lhat in fnnncr limes Arizona could have i taken all tlie water it wanted Horn Hit! Colorado river, but thai 1 (Continued on Page 4) i i Japs Claim New ny, sup- j Soviet ANGELES, iktirch The Berg petals coinpan porting its injunclion suit against i the Office of Price AOministra-1 By UNITED I'KESS tion. charged loday thai lhe OPA announced loday the con- icijnired it to fill ou! iiii.UOU ducii- Hnsinn of a temporary arrange- ments lo record ff.ono ti j ini-ut Soviel Ruiyiia under lions lasl year. .Japan may continue lo op- Jn a series of afri'lavii.s eralc in certain Soviet senteil in federal cuint. I In- n.un-i waters until lhe end of Ihis year, pany. inic nf the Wont's largi-.-il j The T'dtyo board of informa- brokers, asserted that the! linn, in a Tokyo liroadcasl record- necessity for filling out by Press al San Fran- nf "confusing" forms j i-iled lhe agrecmcnl as "def- OPA ,-.....pi-lied it to sue in j mile pri.nf of the amicable and defense. It the fust sin h suit brought against lhe Ol'A. n-specl. of the Japan-Sov- iet nritlralily Ircaly. Ben B. Lindsey, Famed Judge, Founder Of Juvenile Court System, Dies in Los Angeles at Age of 73 I .OS ANGKI.KK, March 'M Hilt. Judge llcnjamin llarr Liiulsey. long-time advocate of companion- ate marriage and founder of the modern American juvenile court system, died today at Good Samar- itan hospital. Allondmg physicians said Judge Lindr.ey, who held court Wi'dne.'i- day a.s usunl, suffered n heart, al- Inck Wednesday night. Removed to the hospital for ob- s.-rvation, in- was reported u "little I belter" yesterday but paired aw.iy suddenly morning. said his death wan "mi expected." i Wlfi- Al Itrilsldn i wife, llenrii-lla. at the bcdnide Khe sulcl In1 lia'l developed a "rapid lictuns I hi-ing lukcn to the hospital. "The doctor.i have not yet yet (Continued on Fagc 3)   

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