Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: December 11, 1942 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for Liking us on Facebook

  • We are retrieving your image from the archive...

  • We are converting your image into tiles...

  • Almost done...

   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - December 11, 1942, Yuma, Arizona                             THE WEATHEK AT repurtcil by U.-8. Burewi Highest last 24 hours ................70 Lowest last 24 hours................41! Average high this date................67 Average low this'date ................43 AND TH TINEl FORECAST to noon Saturday: Mostly fair, 'not quite so cold. VOLUME 290 YUMA, ARIZONA FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1942 THE YUMA ARIZONA SENTINEL- VOLUME 290 SERVICEMEN CENTER TO OPEN SAT. Club Located At 245 Main St.; Opens At The Service Men's Center, li cated at 245 Main street, will be opened tomorrow, it was an- nounced today by the Yuma Ser- vice Men's Recreation committee. This committee is tiie sponsoring organization, assisted by the United Service Organizations and the Federal Security Agency. The Center will be open to all service men tomorrow from p.m. until p.m., and each day thereafter from a.m. un- til p.m. There soldiers, sail- ors and marines will find tables, chairs, writing paper, envelopes, pens, ink. games of various kinds, a piano; free cookies and coffee will be served daily, and a counter has-been installed where packages 'will be wrapped as gifts and for mailing. T.o Furnish Hostesses Service clubs, ladies' organiza- tions and churches will be asked to furnish hostesses each day and to bake cookies. Tomorrow the American Legion Auxiliary will furnish the serving from to and five from to The Red Cross Can- teen will bake and serve the cook- ies tomorrow, donating them to the center. In the future the cook- ies will be baked by various wo- men's organizations but the ma- terials will be furnished by the Center. The Federal Security Agency is to assist by furnishing personnel but as the local project has not yet been officially approved, the WPA temporarily has employed Mrs. Clara Rilcy to work in the Center. I'SO Furnishes Funds The USD is to furnish funds for (Continued on Page 4 F. R. Says Axis Has Lost the Initiative WASHINGTON, Dec. 11 (U.R1-- President Roosevelt. disclosing that American forces overseas will number more than by the end of this month, told congress -today that the "axis powers have, temporarily at least, lost the initiative." The President's statement was in a letter submitting a report to congress on Icnd-lease for the three months ended to- day. In asserting that the axis had lost the initiative for the time being at least, Mr. Roosevelt said that "we must cio ail we can to keep them from regaining it." The report showed that lend- lease assistance to the nation's Allies totaled for the increase of more than one-third over the previous quarter and more than four times the lend-lease total for the quar- ter immediately preceding the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. OCTOBER BIRTH RATE HIGHEST SINCE 1924 Have New Setup For Examining Men For Selective Service Hugh Palmer, secretary of tile Yuma county selective service board, lias announced that the work of examining men for select- ive service each Thursday lias been "streamlined" so that it is not tlie task it formerly was. Physicians of the city have been donating their time to this work, witli Dr. C. L. Wilson doing much of it in recent weeks. He and oth- er physicians continue to give the general physical examinations each Thursday morning in the council chambers of the city hall, but after that examination the men are taken over to the Yuma county health service offices in the basement of the courthouse where the blood tests are made. WHERE U. S. FIGHTS IN NEW GUINEA Jack Menzies, A. Former Yuman, Dies at Tucson Several friends of this communi- ty plan to leave here today for Tucson where they will attend funeral services for Jack Menzies, a former long time resident of this community who died at Tuc- son Wednesday night of a heart attack. Up until three years ago Mr. Menzies lived in Yuma and was employed out of here as a loco- motive engineer with the South- ern Pacific. When he left here he moved to Tucson to take a posi- tion with the railroad as road foreman of engines of the Tucson division. Gallant Cruiser San Francisco Returns Home SAN FRANCISCO Dec. 11 (U.R) The giillnnt cruiser San Fran- cisco, conqueror of a Japanese tattle-ship and leader of an Am- erican Mjuadion that helped de- stroy 28 enemy ships off the Sol- omons, came home today for rc- j pairs and a hero's welcome. Sailing, through the Golden Gate on her own power the 9.950-ton heavy cruiser returned to her name-city to receive the first dec- oration for heroism awarded any TJ. S. combaritant ship in this (NEA Telepliolo) Here's a typical war scene in. the dark, dank jungles of New Guinea where U. S. and Australian forces now press tlie beleaguered Japs near Buna and Gona. Shown arc scantily clad natives, who serve as runners, and guards witli guns clustering in a S'liali iungle clearing where an Allied radio station at the foot of a tree at left kcepr. the detachment in contact with headquarters: Francis Sanguinetti To Get Wings and Commission Sat. WASHINGTON, D.ec. 11 The Census bureau reported to- day that the October birth rate of 23.8 per thousand population, fig- ured on an annual basis, was the highest recorded since February, 1924. The birth rate in every month of 1942 has been higher than in the corresponding month; of last year. For the first 10 months, the rate was 20.5, compared with 17.3 in 1930, 17.9 in 19-10, and 1S.9 in 19J1. The death rate during October was 10.1 per population, making tlie 10-month rate 10.3, compared with 10.6 for the cor- responding period of last year. In- fant deatli rate for the 10 months was 41.2, compared with 46.5 last year. F. R. Says He Asked Norris to Continue Expressing Views WASHINGTON, Dec. 11 (U.R) President Roosevelt said today that lie had asked Sen. George Norris. Ind., Neb., to continue expressing his liberal views to the country after he leaves the sen- ate next month. Mr. Roosevelt said, however, he had not asked Norris- defeated for re-election last month by Re- publican Kenneth S- remain in tiie government. Norris last night told a fare- well dinner audience, in a speech as impassioned as any he had made in -10 years of congressional debate, that the American people face n bitter contest with forces more interested in money and power than they are in a real peace to follow the war. Committee Named To Map Draft Deferment Policies WASHINGTON, Dec. 11 President Roosevelt today ap- pointed a special three-man com- mittee to formulate uniform pol- icies to govern occupational de- ferment of federal employes from the draft. MJr. Roosevelt implied that the committee's policies might devel- op also into an overall guide for occupational deferment of work- ers in private industry. Mr. Roosevelt named Paul Bel- lamy, editor of the. Cleveland Plain Dealer, as chairman of the committee. Tlie other members are Ordway Tcad, of Harper Bros., New York; and Eric John- ston, president of the chamber of of commerce of the United States. Word has been received by the management of the Sanguinetti organization to the effect that Francis Sanguinetti, son of E. F. Sanguinetti, Yuma pioneer mer- chant and developer, will receive his wings tomorrow, Saturday, De- cember 12, at Albuquerque, New Mexico. Yourig Sanguinetli will receive his commission as lieutenant under the classification of bombardier. It is reported that immediately up- on his graduation lie will he given a short period of intensive tactical training which is the final prcpacr ation before being assigned to act' ive duty. Francis is a native son of Yuma. He attended the local primary schools, Brophy college at Phoe- and is a graduate of Santa Clara college. He was prominently identified witli many school activ- ities during his college days botli at Brophy and Santa Clara col- leges and was the recipient of a number of medals and awards as outstanding in elocution, debates and dramatics. The people of Viima likely best remember Francis for the active- part taken by him in promoting a number of cultural entertainments in tlie past few years. He is fond of music and has held a number of recitals for the enjoyment of his friends and music lovers of Yuma. CLEAHUP OF VICE CONDITION IN STATE PLANNED AFTER THREAT OF INVOKING MAY ACT OR MARTIAL LAW PHOENIX, Oriz., Dee. 11 (U.R) A complete cleanup of vice and venereal disease conditions in Ari- zona was planned today under threat of martial law by Gov. Sid- ney P. Osborn, military and fed- eral officials. Tho governor yesterday meeting of law enforcement offi- cials here to clean up the state "or I'll ask the military authori ties to invoke the May art and if they won't do that, I'll declare martial law and have the state adjutant general clean things up." Says Progress hugm Military authorities present at yesterday's meeting declared the city of Phornix, closed for the past 12 days to personnel of Salt llivcr Valley airfields, had not made much progress in cleaning up to their satisfaction. Officials of the Federal Security Agency presented reports covering conditions throughout the state, and called for quick action, saying there is a possibility federal action might be taken in "ten days or two weeks" if the cleanup does nut progress satisfactorily. To .Invoke May Art Military authorities said war de- partment orders for a cleanup of the entire state must be observed or the May act will be invoked. Jt was pointed out that it tiie May act was invoked, there is a strong possibility the virtual quarantine of the' state would not be iifted until the end of the war. Federal authorities pointed out tiie venereal disease rates among white military personnel arc high- er in Arizona than in any of the other Western states. Military authorities in attend- ance at the meeting declared the city of Phoenix had had ample time to clean up the city since the out of bounds order was declared, and said the arrests of approxi- mately SO women had been a "smokescreen" and that the wrong women had been arrested for the most part. Problems Snlved Law enforcement officers from other cities throughout the state (Continued on Page 4) Red Airmen Open Attack on Nazi Supply Columns IJ.V .M. S. HA.NDLKK Ilnilril Press Staff Correspondent MOSCOW. plane Dec. squadrons led by Stormovik dive bombers opened a ferocious attack on German suppiy columns and troop con- centrations today in an attempt to reduce tiie weight of intensify- ing enemy counterattacks north- west of Stalingrad- Regrouping their forces, the Germans were throwing regular troops, special units and auxiliar- ies into their attacks, trying des- perately to stabilize the front and stop the persistent offensive of the Russians which fhicatcned encirclement and destruction of their forces piece by piece. Moving Reserves It was not believed that the Germans had obtained reinforce- ments outside, but that they wero moving all possible reserves north- ward and eastward on tlie North- west-Stalingrad front. On the Central front west of Moscow, the noon communique said, the main Russian forces con- solidated captured positions while the offensive continued in some sectors. West, of Rzhev the Russians were reported to have smashed a German defense point, killing about 600 of its defenders and capturing six, field guns and other Important materials. Improvement in Sanitary Conditions In Yuma Eating Places Reported By Army Officer After Inspection Returning to Yuma tins week for a re-check of sanitary condi- tions in cafes, restaurants, and other places where, food or drink is handled, a high ranking army medical officer of tile Ninth ser- vice command reported that he found some improvement in res- taurant and soft drink places hut stated that there is still room for improvement. One restaurant, he said, showed m improvement and but little at-, tempt to make the changes he had suggested when in this vicinity a short lime ago. .This establish- ment, he said, will be ordered "out of bounds" for military personnel within the next ten days if it is not brought up to standard. The officer stressed that all res- taurants and soft drink places should be serving only pasteurized milk. Accompanying the officer and his aides on the inspection trip was O. V. Cooper, state sanitata- rian of the Arizona state depart- ment of health. Mr. Cooper has been in Yuma making routine checks on places handling food- stuffs and urging adherence to the regulations set up and recommend- ed by the Yuma county health ser- vice in cooperation with tlie army official. Allies Continue Heavy Pressure On Japs Trapped at Buna, New Guinea TO ENFORCE TWO HOUR PARKING Police to Issue Warning Tickets Tomorrow In addition to eliminating con. ter parking on Main street (put into effect this week as a safety city police officers have announced that, starting1 Saturday (tomorrow) tickets will be given for more than two hour parking at the curbs on Main street. Business men, clerks, downtown workers, lanchcr.s in fact, about everyone in the. I fallen into the habit of parking on Main street early in the morn- ing and Jetting their cars stay there all day long if they have no occasion to use them during the day. And for some years police offi- cers have ignored this practice and have made no effort to en force the two hour parking signs on the arcade pillars along the street. Courtesy Tickets First Courtesy tickets arc to be giv- en for overtime parking today. Tomorrow, just tickets will be given and tile recipient will be directed to take the ticket and make a call on Judge Ersel Byrd at the city hall. City officials .in putting into operation the two hour Main .street parking rule, feel that it not fair to people who want to park 15 minutes or an hour to have to look all over town for a parking place when dozens of curs sit in choice locations throughout the day. Center .Stripe Planned It is planned, officers announce, to have a broad white stripe painted down the middle of Main street to warn drivers who may be strangers in the community that center of the street parking is no longer permitted. Yesterday a number of high school boys assisted local police officer.1! in keeping the center of the street clear and there were many comments on the changed High School Boy Is Injured In Fall From Bicycle- Harold Eaton, son of Mr. and Mrs. P. K. Eaton of Magnolia ave- nue, is in the Yuma General hos- pital suffering from a head injury of a serious nature which he evi- dently received in a fall from his bicycle. Harold, a junior in the Yuma Union high school, left the home of his parents late yesterday after- noon to ride to the home of neighbor some two or three blocks away. Later he returned to his home with face and head injuries and in a semi conscious condition. He could remember but little about how lie had been injured. At the hospital it was feared he had suffered a skull fracture or at least a severe concussion. X-ray pictures were taken to determine the extent of the injuries. Navy Announces Loss of Ship In Solomons WASHINGTON Dec. 1.1 The navy announced today the loss of the ton naval auxil- iary cargo ship Alchiba in the Solomons. Only three men of the crew are missing. The navy communique also told how an army flying fortress on a reconnaissance flight over New Georgia island in the Solomons was attacked by 15 Japanese Zeros and returned to its bnsc after shooting down five of the attackers. The Alchiba was the 27th Amer- can naval vessel to bo lost in the Solomons campaign. Japanese osses so far are 52 sunk. appearance thus created of downtown Yuma Ky ItltVDON TAVKS UniliHl Press Staff Correspondent GKN. MACARTHUR'S HEAD- QUARTERS, Australia, Dec. 11 holding the Al- lied salient between Buna and Buna mission on tile New Guinea front have repulsed another ma- jor Japanese attempt to wipe them out, it was reported today. Australians who cleaned the enemy out of the village of Gona were advancing along the beach, southeast, toward oilier Japanese .strong points in the Cape Killer- ton and Saiiananda sections. Gen, Douglas MacArthur's air force continued to pound the Jap- anese air strip near Buna Mission, were ground forces made further slight' gains yesterday. 'There was heavy artillery fire. The Japan- ese u.xeil Tfi-millimctcr guns and mortars. The Americans lobbed shells up to 4-ineh size into the Japanese anti-aircraft positions, using Sl-millimelcr and 105-milli- meter mortars brought in by planes from Australia. Kscape Attempt r'jiils Don Caswell, United Press stuff correspondent at the front, de- scribed in a dispatch written Wednesday the last hopeless iit- tenipt of the Japanese to escape from ttonii when the Aussies clos- ed in there, pursued one Australian patrols group Into rough swamps along the Ambogo river, killing 18 and capturing three. The Australians destroyed Japan- ese motorboats to prevent an cs- cnpc by flea. N. Y. Teachers Are Promised Protection By Police Dept. NEW YORK, Dec. U (U.R) Police Commissioner Lewis J. Val- entine today promised aid to pub- lic school teachers who appealed to him for protection from their unruly pupils. The New York local of the American Federation of Teachers went over the heads of the board oC education to ask po- lice intercession to curb assaults in an upsurge of student rowdyism, one instance of which cost the life of a junior high school teacher. The action disclosed a wide- spread breakdown of discipline in the schools described as "serious" by the Teachers' Alliance. The Alliance reported that many teach- ers had had their eyes blackened by "unruly pupils." Prevention Of Sabotage Topic Of FBI Conference PHOENIX, Ariz., Dec. 11 (U.R) The first of five conferences be- tween peace officers of Arizona cities and counties and the Fed- eral Bureau of Investigation opened here today, with sabotage prevention and Selective Service act violations the principal topics of discussion. Other meetings will be held in the near future in Tucson, Prcs- cotl, Kingman and Safford, it was announced by the FBI. 11 SHOPPING DAYS WARBOHDS'STAMPS YOUTH OF 18 REGISTER TODAY WASHINGTON, Dec. 11 Selective Service registration of about youths who have reached their ISth birthday since July 1 began today. Despite this addition to the armed services manpower reserve, reports were coming from several cities, including Chicago, New- York and Washington, that child- less married men soon would be inducted because of the loss of eligible men over 3S., The registration ii; the sixth conducted since the Selective Ser- vice act was passed and the first under the new manpower set-up which placed Selective Service in tlie War Manpower commission. Today and through next Thurs- day, those who became 18 between July 1 and Aug. 31, inclusive, will go to their local draft boards to register. AXIS TANK ATTACK IS REPULSED Allies Frustrate Enemy Move Near Medjez el Bab LONDON, Dec. 11 man tank columns have been thrown back in a sharp battle near Medjez el Dab, 20 miles southwest of Tebotirba, an Allied communique revealed today, and in other forward areas of Tunisia Allied patrols are on the offen- ;ive. The communique did not state specifically whether Allied troops had fallen back on Medjez el Dab when they relinquished Tebourba last week end, but it appeared likely that the strong hill posi- tions in which they are now es- tablished are in the vicinity of this town, which holds a com- manding highway junction posi- tion on the Medjerda river. Heads Impassable The strong stand of the Allied forces at Medjez el Dab was b'e- ieved to reflect the arrival of in- n-easing numbers of reinforce- ments in the forward area. These forces thave been pushed ahead despite the handicap of bad weather which has made some in the mountains country virtually impassable. Increasing 'strength of the Al- ied forces in Tunisia and at the eastern end of the African front it El Agheila led London observ-- ?rs to predict that the axis short- y would face an active two-front igiit to hold its position in Tun- sia and Tripolitania. Actions Filed By U. S. Against Six S. F. Bay Landlords SAN FRANCISCO. Dec. 11 (U.R) government today charged six prominent San Francisco Bay legion landlords witli criminal olation of federal rent-control lyws in vital war indu.sl.ry hous- ing areas. Criminal actions fileii in federal court, by Assistant IJ. H. Attorney Valentine Hanuuack. LOS ANGKLKS, Dec. II (U.R) Criminal informations were filed today against four San Diego, Cil., landlords, charging them with violations of federal rent control regulations. The informations were equival- ent to grand jury indictments. WPB to Aid Users Of Welding Rods IM1OKNIX, Dec. II IU.R) Users of welding rods fur mainten- ance and repair purposes may now apply to the Phoenix office of the War Production board for emer- gency assistance during the short- age of tlie rods in this area, it was announced today by Lee G. Browne, branch manager for tlie WPB here. Browne said a 60-day supply of the rods can be obtained in order to alleviate tlie present critical shortage. Farm users may also I apply, he said. WASHINGTON Dec. 11 Two enemy tank columns which lenetrated Allied lines to a point icar Medjez el Dab hi Tunisia 'esterdny afternoon were forced back by vigorous counterattacks he war department announced to- lay. Text of Army Communique No. 265 as of a.m. "North Africa: "1. Attacks in the direction of feiljez el Dab were launched yes- (Continued on Page 4) Escaped Convict 'Gets Religion', Returns to Prison HUNTSV1LLB, Texas, Dec. "it (U.R) Carl Fulton Byars, a robber who escaped with a killer, resumed penitentiary life by his own choice today because the Lord "told me tlie wrong I was doing." Byars, 23, unguarded and returned by bus from Nacogdocll- es to Huntsville prison on a tick- et purchased by the Rev. B. D. Clifford, 32, Philadelphia evange- list, at whose revival meeting By- ars "got religion." Serving a seven-year term for two hijackings, Byars escaped from the Sugarland, Texas, prison farm on Nov. 23 with Claude (Cowboy) Henry, 29, who wanted to soe or free his slayer wife, Toni Jo, before she was executed at Lake Charles, La. Henry, a con- victed killer, was recaptured three days later at Beaumont. Six Companies Expand Activities To East Coast NEW YORK, Dec. 11 Tlie "Six of which Henry J. Kaiser is tlie dominant figure, held control today of the Crocker-Wheeler Manu- facturing Co., expanding its ship construction to tlie East coast. Tin1 West Coast federation ob- tained the assets and-business of tlie company for in cash through tlie Joshua Hendy Iron Works of Sunnyvale, Calif., of which tlie "Six Companies" and Is associates are the sole stock- holders. It was reported in connection witli tlie acquisition that the Unit- ed States Maritime commission furnished approximately one-half of the funds for the purchase.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication