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Yuma Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: June 03, 1942 - Page 1

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Publication: Yuma Daily Sun

Location: Yuma, Arizona

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - June 3, 1942, Yuma, Arizona                             THK WEATHER AT JTUMA At rtjwrtod by V. it. Wmltor Bureau Highest last 24 hours ................98 Lowest last 24 hours ................03 Average high this dale................98 Average low this date ................61 AND NTINEL VOLUME 130 KOKKCASX For 24. hours to Thursday noun, fair, temperatures about the .same. YUMA. ARIZONA WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 1942 THE YUMA ARIZONA TANK BATTLE RAGING ON LIBYA FRONT Nazi Tanks And Vehicles Destroyed CAIRO, June land and air forces captured or destroyed at least tanks and vehicles in smashing Col. Gen. Krwin Rommel's offensive, but hard-pressed n-vis units still bat- tle fiercely against increasing Im- perial forces on the Knights- bridge front 28 miles-southwest of Tobruk. dispatches and com- muniques reported today. A bitter and perhaps decisive tank battle raged in 100-degree heat on a 10-mile front east of the two gaps the enemy punched in the main British line between coastal El Gazala and Bir Hach- eim. 48 miles southwest of To- bruk. Counter Blows Sfrnck While Rommel stepped up his pressure from the west, Lieut. Gen. Neil M. Ritchie's British Eighth Army countered with new blows from the cast in an effort to. wipe out all resistance. Farth- er east, other British units were repotted "mopping up" small forces that were left along the original axis line of advance last week. front dispatches said a large enemy force was involved at Knightbridgc and both sides were hurling all available equipment into action. Despite recurring sand storms, British infantry units were on front-line duty. Rommel was making no further effort to withdraw additional me- chanized forces through the gaps in the mine rr, T-V June 3 Eighth Army, seizing the initia- tive in the Libyan desert, has captured the German stronghold of Segnali by sending a raiding column 30 miles west of the Im- perial main positions a Middle East Headquarters revealed today. communique The British comniander-in-chief, Council Asked For Additional Night Policeman A letter from the Merchants as- sociation of the chamber of com- merce, urging employment of an additional policeman for night du- ty was read at the city council last night. I Recorder Ersel C. Byrcl was in- structed to write the association stating that funds for this pur- pose were not available but that if the group could show how the necessary additional funds could be raised the council will consider the matter. City Attorney William H. West- (Continued on Page 4) CITY TO SELL ROCK CRUSHER A resolution authorizing adver- tising for sale the city's rock crasher was adopted by the city council last night. Mayor W. S. Ingalls explained j and Rumania third. DECLARATION OF WAR GETS HOUSE OKAY Bulgaria HwWgaryuv And Nantcd In 3 Resolutions WASHINGTON, June 3 The house unanimously adopted today and sent to the senate three separate resolutions declaring that the United States is in a state of war with Bulgaria. Hungary and Rumania. All three had declared war against this country last De- cember. The senate is expected to "pass the war resolutions against the ax- is satellites tomorrow and send them to the White House for Pres- idential signature. No Discussion There was no house discussion of the war declarations as Demo- cratic Leader John W. MeCormack, Mass.. called them by one first, Hungary second, RAF Chalks Up Greatest Air Raid in History on Cologne COVCNTKY TONSfc f that for the duration of the war no more WPA labor would be av- ailable, hence the city's paving program was at an end. There- fore it was suggested the crusher he sold. Engineer W. L. Ellison good cost crusher was in and originally said the condition Negroes' Riot In Bahamas Quelled NASSAU, Bahamas, June 3 British soldiers, police and volunteers patrolled Nassau and its suburbs today to prevent new outbreaks :.by native. Negro labor- who rlBU'd -jfcmbiy Chart "d here fie creat RAF raid on Cologne, durinj which 1500 bombers ound sue! hov; this raid in ether death-riea'in? air attacks on European Telcplwio) ;ounds oi coin r- Thus, for the third time in six months the house had acted to recognize the existence of war be- tween this nation and axis coun- tries. The first vote came on Dec. 8. when war was declared on Jap- an. On the second occasion, Dec. j 11, war was ddclared against Ger- many and Italy. The vote for the declaration against Bulgaria was announced as 357 to 0; that against Hungary as 359 to 0; and Rumania. 360 to.O. Rep. Jeannette Rankin, R., Mont., who was the lone dissenter when war was declared against the Berlin-Rome-Tokyo Axis, was not present when the rolls were called today. s _____F terday, prolestlngThe small wages they were being paid for work on a large United States project. Nassau was quiet last night, and officials believed the trouble was over. But while the riot was at its height, to Negroes smashed windows along fashion- able Bay street and damaged or i by seven members featured the looted liquors, rare perfumes and I Program at the weekly Rotary Sketches Feature Rotary Program Brief autobiographical sketches JAPS RENEW ATTACKS IN CHEKIANG Chinese Resist Strongly On All Fronts CHUNGKING, China, June 3 reinforced Japanese columns, operating behind an in- tense artillery and aerial barrage, renewed heavy attacks today on the i Chuhsien Rector in Chekiang prpr' vincey a. The Japanese attacks worn strongly resisted by the Chinese west and northwest of Kinhwa, which the enemy recently captured. Chuhsien is about 43 miles from Gen. Sir Claude J. E. Auchin- fabrics worth thousands of pounds, leek, disclosed that British forces The mob moved into Grants yesterday stopped another axis attack on their southern flank near Bir Hacheim, 48 miles south- west of Tobruk. NEW YORK. June 3 British Broadcasting coin pany said today that Italian Premier Bcnito Mussolini was) reported to be Libya. Town, Nassau's large Negro sec- tion, Monday night and burned a police station, a fire station and an ambulance. Rites For Mrs. Florence Shook Thursday at 10 Funeral .services for Mrs. Flor- ence II. Shook, who died Monday night at the home of her daugh- ter. Mrs. Jack Winn, 820 Second nvenue. will be held at the O. C. Johnson o.hapej _.tojnorrow_ morn- ing beginning at it xvas an- nounced today at the Johnson mortuary. Interment will take place in Desert Lawn Memorial Park. 'HOPPER MENACE ELIMINATED, SAYS LAUDERDALE PHOENIX, Ariz., June 3 (U.R) A grasshopper menace in .south- eastern Arizona has been elimin- ated, although several weeks of "mopping up" will be necessary, J. L. E. Lauderdale. state entom- ologist, reported today. The infestation of 'hoppers was especially serious in the Sulphur Springs Valley area and airplanes were used in spreading the poison bait. The legislature appropriated for the control work this year. Lauderdale and federal officials advised Gov. Sidney P. Osbom that an appropriation of would be needed from the next ses- sion of the legislature to combat the grasshoppers next .spring. Mayor Submits Proposed Budget For Fiscal Year Beginning Next July 1 Mayor W. S. Ingalls presented to the city council last night his pro- posed budget for operating the city government for the fiscal year beginning July 1. The budget, which would provide for raising by direct taxation, is lit- tle changed from that adopted for the current fiscal year. The budget comes up for adop- tion in July. The proposed budget follows: General Fluid Revenue necessary to meet ex- penditures budgeted, Estimated revenues from mis- cellaneous .sources, Direct Tax, Si'ccinl Fund Refunding bond. Interest, Library funil, Bund fund, Firemen's Pension fund, Special improvement bonds and interest fund, Total, Total to be raised by direct tax- ation, Details of General Rudgct 1942-10-13 LEGISLATIVE- Salaries councilmcn, Board of equalization, Elections publications, etc. Advertising ordinances, Total, ASSESSOR-- Salary, assessor, Salary, assistant, Office supplies and expenses Total, Salary, Office supplies ami expenses, Total, on PugeC) club luncheon meeting at Clymer's yesterday. President Clarence H. Trlgg pre- sided. Pat Murphy was program chairman. Those who spoke brief- ly outlining principal points in tiioir life stories were: Murphy, Joe Lewis, Norb Scares, Leonard Cue, C. G. (Chuck) Ekstrom, Richard Loo and Sam Park. President Trigg read excerpts from the district governor's month- ly letter. Tlie Yuma club last month had an average attendance of SS.46 per cent. Three clubs--- Tempo, Superior and had 100 per cent a tendance. 513 U. S. Soldiers Listed As Killed In Philippines June 3 A total of 513 American soldiers and 479 Philippine scouts were listed as killed in the Philippines up to within a few days of the fall of Bataan and Corregidor, when disrupted communications prevented transmission of a more complete list. The xvar department revealed those figures today in making public the'names of 75 additional U. S. soldiers who were killed in action or who died of wounds in the Philippines. Others Wounded In addition. 930 American sol- diers and 754 Philippine scouts were reported wounded in action. The war department said there also were numerous soldiers of tht Philippine. Commonwealth Army who lost their lives in defending their homeland. Previously, the War department th'a.t soldiers, bluejackets, marines and casuals, including civilians were-last re- ported on Corregidor and the oth- er Manila bay forts and all were presumed to be prisoners of war. It was also estimated that ap- proximately American and Filipino combat troops, several thousand non-combatant and sup- ply troops and about clv- llinns were on Bataun and pre- sumably In the enemy's hands. Kinhwa. Fighting Heavy Heavy fighting also was report- ed soutli of Nanchang in Kiangsi province and on the Kwangtung front, near Canton. At Kunming. American Volun- teer Group headquarters disclosed that the "Flying Tigers" during May destroyed or damaged 62 planes and prevented the Japanese from consolidating for a major drive into Yunnan province. Brig. Gen. Claire L. Chennault's airmen inflicted heavy casualties (Continued on 4) HEART IS FATAL TO 6EO. DE CORSE George G. deCorse, 62 year old native Yuman and an employee nf the local utility company since 1806. died shortly after last night following a heart attack, members of the family announced. A wake will iieid tonight beginning at at the O. C. Johnson chapel. Funeral arrange- ments will be announced later. He was horn in Yuma May 5. 1SSO. Surviving are the widow, Mrs. iF.rances deCorse, five sons, .George Jr., -Henry. Clarence, Joe. all of Yuma; a daughter, Mrs. Lucille Burnett of Burbank, Calif.; 14 grandchildren; three brothers. Charles of Los Angeles, Sam and Ben. of Yuma. and a sister. Josie deCorse. Funeral services will be held at the Johnson chapel tomorrow af- ternoon at with the Rev. A. M. Krahl of the Yuma Indian Methodist Mission officiating. In- terment will be in the Yuma ceme- tery. Mr. de Corse was a member of Lodge No. 10 of the Alianza His- pano Americano. All members of the lodge were asked by officals to meet at the Johnson chapel tor_ morrow afternon and attend the services. Big Naval Construction Program Is Planned To Complete Two Ocean Navy Within Next 24 Months WASHINGTON, June 3 (U.PJ the number of ships of the pres- Chairman Carl Vinson, q., Ga.. ent- fleet- Vinson predicted the originally projected two-ocean navy prob- >f the house naval affairs com- 1 uittee announced today he will be complctetl within introduce legislation for a vastly tnc "ncxt 24 months" and that as increased navy construction pro- gram estimated to cost 000.000. It will provide tor "fast as the ways become vacant the new program will get under- He said the new program would authorize: 500.000 tons of aircraft carriers. tons of cruisers of both light and heavy types. tons of destroyers and destroyer escort vessels, which he described as smaller but similar small vessels for patrol and to the real destroyer, duty. It was believed the pro-i 800 small vessels "suitable for posed plan would virtually double use as patrol and mine vessels." tens of- new combatant vessels, including tons of addition- al aircraft carriers. To Produce 300 Ships said the program would produce more than 500 new fight- ing ships in addition to some 800 Will Discuss the 1943 Cotton Crop Insurance Program at Phoenix Meeting; Public to Attend Gco. A. Pickering, secretary J. Carl Wright, assistant to the the agricultural conservation as- of the crop insurance sociation, has received a letter in-l-corporation, will be present at the viting all in Yuma county who are 'meeting as well us representatives interested to attend a meeting in ,'of the Washington office of the Phoo.nix on June 10 for the pur- 'agricultural adjustment agency, pose of discussing the procedure. I, Any persons or organizations In- U.S.O.WAR FUND NOW TOTALSS978 Additional subscriptions report- ed today by the Yuma county com- mittee of the U.S.O. War Fund drive bring the total to It is hoped to finish the local drive within the next ten days unless the quota of S2500.00 is reached before that time. Send in your do- nation now and help give the boys "a home away from the committee urges. additional contributions Jol- RAF. HITS RUHR AREA ..S25.00 The low: Wing Yick Lung Co. Mittry Bros. Construction Co. 25.00 H. C. Kelly 20.00 Wednesday Afternoon Club 10.00 George Holmes 10.00 Dr. A. I. Podolsky 10.00 Nurses' Ass'n......................... 5.00 Elmer L. Price 5.00 R. E. Crowder 0.00 j Garden Club 5.001 W. R. Trumbo 5.001 Mr. Mrs. N.H. Leong W. H. Wallace 5.00 Mr. Mrs. R. D. Gray 5.00 P. K. Coffeen 5.00 Ralph L. Brown 5.00 Yuma Fire Dept..................... 5.00 John F. Hum........................ 5.00 S. Ingalls 5.00 Postal Cleiks Auxiliary 5.00 Lloyd Brown 5.00 Mr. and Mis. B. Burkitt -1.00 (Continued on Page 5) Envisage Nightly Attacks On Target By Bombers LONDON'. June 3. Royal Air Force renewed ham- mering attacks on battered Ger- man war industries and the Eur- opean coast today, while official air circles envisaged a program that would concentrate bombers over a single axis target area in three hours. Earlier attacks by more than planes' on Cologne and Es- sen revealed that the Bomber Command had been successful in organizing "monster raids." it was stated in official sources. Thus the previously disclosed proposals for raids by an average of planes nightly or more than a month may be re- garded as feasible at some future date. Hope to Double Record Air experts said that in the Cologne raid, the planes were timed to reach their targets at six second intervals for 90 min- utes. But In future raids, they said, it is hoped to double the number of planes in a period of two hours, thus putting a bomber on the target every three or four seconds. This plan, it was emphasized, will depend on ability to provide the necessary number of bomb- ers in the future and is not to be expected on anything approaching a sustained scale in the near fu- ture. Nor is an average of bombers in the air nightly likely to be achieved for a long time. Meantime, RAF torces of sev- orai hundred, such as bit the Ruhr and other areas again last l- night, will be employed on a sus- VOLUME 130 laps Raid Alaska WASHINGTON. June 3 Four Japanese bombers and about IS fighters today raided Dutch Harbor, Alaska, where a U. S. naval station is lo- cated. A naval communique said the attack lasted ap- proximately 15 minutes at noon, E.W.T. No further details were made available by the na- vy in its first announce- ment. Text of Navy Department communique No. 83, as of 4 p.m., EWT: "North Pacific Area. "I. Information has been received that Dutch Har- bor, Alaska, was attacked by four Japanese bombers and about 15 fighters at approximately 6 a.m. local time today (12 noon EWT) The attack lasted approx- imately 15 minutes. "2. No further details are available at this time. "3. There is nothing to report from other areas." Dutch Harbor is located on UnaUska, one of the Aleution islands, and lies about miles northwest of San Fran- cisco. It is miles northeast of Tokyo. WPB Order Bars Construction of Wildlife Building Because of the War Production re- Board's order Xo. L-ll, prohibit- House Unit Votes To Abolish CCC tained basis, it was added. Fourteen planes failed to turn, against SS lost the night be- j jng construction other than de- fere. But the smoke and ground construction, start of work haze, so thick that observation the U. S. Fish and Wildlife was difficult, hindered German Service building has been post- anti-aircraft fire and it was be- poned. it was announced today by lievi-.l the loss ratio was probably j Qeno A. Aimmdson, manager of lower than in any of the throe the wildlife refuges in the''Yuma raids so far in the new offensive area. which is aimed at smashing Ger- H naci been planned to start man industrial centers one by one. construction soon on a service building at First street and Fourth avenue, and much of the needed material had been secur- I ed, Amundson said. PLAN RITES FOR CRUZ PAYAN Funeral sonvices for Cruz Pay- an, 63, of Gadsden who died early today will be held at the Yuma Catholic church tomorrow, at an hour to bo set later, it wa.s an- nounced at the O. C. Johnson mortuary. Burial will take place in the Yuma cemetery. WASHINGTON, June 3 The house appropriations commit- tee today voted to abolish the Civilian Conservation Corps. The committee, reporting a 51.- I5S.451.660 bill for the Federal Se- curity Agency and the Labor de- partment, struck out an item In continue the CCC in operation on a curtailed basis durin." the 194.'-; fiscal venr start-! ing July 1. The adminislration had jlhf home in Gadsdcn. Bike Licensing Ordinance Urged Born in Mexico, aii.sdfn 20 years 'O two sons. Ramon and Isaac City Recorder Ersel C. Byrd suggested at last night's council meeting that an ordinance be providing for licensing of hicjvli-s. He stated the police department is having difficulty establishing he came to i of stolen bicycles, at it. Surviving times two or more persons claim- thr same machine, neither both of Gadsden. and a daughter. having the serial number. Mrs. Trinauad Alunuz of El Paso. City Attorney William H. West- Texas. A wake will bo hold tonight at an ordinance and report back at the next meeting. over wa.s directed to prepare such proposed to operate CCC j camps. The Labor-Federal Security ap-: propagations .subcommittee had di-1 vided three to tiiroo on a motion; to strike the CCC funds from the] bill, the tie vote permitting its re- j timlicm in the measure by th .subcommittee. The CCC has been cue 01 th major targets of the congressional' economy bloc ever sir.ee 01 the war. California State Militia Company Being Organized in Bard Section DAUGHTER BORN TO 7HELMA SNARDi, FORMER YUMAN A daughter was horn in Italy about the middle nf last month to Thelma Molina Inimli. former and policies to be followed for the cotton crop insurance, pro- gram. The meeting is to be held at the Waricopa county agricultural agent's'office, Went Mndlson teresled in stabilizing the income of cotton producers are asked to be present or hiivc representatives prc-ionl. Anyone having sugges- tions hi-, would liltc to be incor- porated In the program is naked to street, Phoenix. It will -start at. send In these suggestions Ininv ii.m, Slops toward formation of a j munition. Regular drill periods California State Militia company' are to bo held and the company in t h e Bard-Winterhaven-Fort members are to elect their own Yuma district were taken at a officers. held Monday night at Thinned Bard, with men of the district Meetings planning tor next week signing enlistment cards. j were announced as follows: l-'rank Imperial conn- nesday night. MWT. at KVir! l.y farm adviser, addressed the Yuma Subagency; Thursday nignt. meeting, explaining the purpose of MWT. Winteih.'ivon school- the militia, based upon the Home house. Guard units which have been or- I The men are to be trained in samzed in F.ngland to combat en- .scouting, tactics, camouflage, at- paratroops and assist the fed- lacking from ambush and com- oral troops in defending their batting paratroops. homo communities. To Serve At Home IJecruits who enlisted Mon-i.'i official, according to word reoeiv-j The Militia troops arc to serve njjjht wuv: eil by her mother, Mrs. Gus T. j.'inly in their own counties, while, Virgil H. Prater. Harrison If. Molina, now a I. Mecca, I the State Guard troops may be Calif. Mrs. Molina writes that she moved to other counties, Bcy- leceiveil the cabled announcement j selling said, via Zurich, Swllxerliinil. and I hut the new gi named -Margaret Joan. Enlistment is for the duration has been I of the war and each man must furnish his own firearm and am- Hunt. Henry A. Morley, William L. Wallace, Kdwanl C. Wilbur P. Owen, Leonard T. Wil- son. Karl J. L. W. Por- ter. Samuel C. Caddis. Aualn K tContinucdon I I)   

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