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Yuma Daily Sun: Saturday, April 18, 1942 - Page 1

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - April 18, 1942, Yuma, Arizona                             SATU ;OM :AS, THE WEATHJEKAT U. B. Wwttwr Highest 24 hours 77 Lowest UiBt 24 hours 50 Average high this date 85 Average low this dutc 3LUME Meet .he lion lesdayl "oincrtl il martef ilans it Kul The THE YUMA ARIZONA SENTINEL- ca N'aiJ uitteil ir-l obe 'belli! Somrl I. .fif PROCLAMJITIOH iKIZOKA FLEDGE LL UJfc MERCHANLSHIPS cean-Going Tanker nd Cargo Vessels Included In Order War Shipping Administration To Direct Operation of Merchant Marine, In Close Cooperation With Navy WASHINGTON, April 18 i taken title to or is using 75 per War Shipping Administra-. cent of U. S. freighter tonnage, tion' has requisitioned "all esscn- j The War Shipping Administra- tial ocean-going tankers and dry' tion, recently created by Presi- cargo vessels owned by American dent Roosevelt, has taken over citizens." Admiral Emory S. Land, j functions of the Maritime Com- adrninistratpr. announced today, j mission in directing the operation The announcement said the ac- i of the American merchant marine, tion affected "several hundred j Under the requisitioning order, the owners of vessels affected will become agents of the War Ship- ping Administration, which will conduct all future merchant ma- rine operations, presumably in close cooperation with the navy. There has been criticism that certain private ships wore alleg- edly disregarding naval instrui-.- tlons in submarine-infested wa- ters. However, it was stated that this was not connected with lo- Taylor, 62, a retired Baptist min-j that the gov- iHler. died at o'clock yesler- ernmcnt js noj. day afternoon at the Yuma valley shjp 6f hy lhc home of his .son., .Earl Taylor. ___rter basis, with the owners be paid "at a reasonable rate." The government already has Rev. J. R. Taylor Retired, Dies At Son's Home 111 for over a year. Rev. J. n. VriBi-JLS the Treasury of the United States that the .arniSVf cvfry Hcrlcfn citizen be enlisted in of systematic thrift; and s WHIRKAS it 12 suggested that every wage-earnpr in the State sign oleSffo regularly out of current inoom. through the Furcnase of Dsfense Savings Stamps and Bonds; and nit in'critioal h, aare not in conflict already signed by so aany of our workers, ape doing their without complaint; F I Sidney P. Osborn, do hereby deslffmte c. citizen to pledge to set aside regular savings Savings Bonds or Stamps. Taylor had been -active in the! ministry o'f the Baptiat church, j Some 14 months ago, his health j failing, he Taylor canic j here to live-with the'son. j Rev. .Taylor was born'in Beat-; tie. Kansas in 1879. Close living relatives are the son here: anoth- cr son. William, in Lane. Kansas: i the widow, with her husband thru his lingering Illness; three broth- I and one sister, all living- in Kansas. Funeral services will be held at tin- Valley Baptist church Monday afternoon at with the pas- tors of the three local Baptist churches--Rev. J. G. Anderson. Rev. Ray Corsage and Rev. C. S. Scott-- -officiating. Interment'will take place in the Yuma cemetery. Gets Record Rain; Big Crop Damage E If R 7.1 0 STATE purchase o, uc. I hire hereunto hind and caused tlis Great Seal "of tiis- State of- Arizona be affixed this Eighth day of April, in the year of our lord One Thoussnd Nino :.'undrta and Forty-tine. R o H Home Destroyed By Fire Near Noon Today MIAMI. Fla., April IS iU.R) A two-day rainfall which left many streets partly under water, and crop damage estimated at close to 52.000.000 in south Flor- ida broke all existing April iw- ords in Miami, the weather bu- reau revealed today. Meteorologist Rrncsl Cars on said the Thursday-Friday down- fall totaled 13.10 inches in the downtown Miami area and 19.38 inches at the bureau's municipal airport station. Highest fall re- corded for April previously had been 10.75 in 1809. Woman Jailed As Member Subversive IIS PLANES i Plans Completed I DAinuACC For War Bonds RAID BASE AT RANGOON Flying Fortresses Make 2nd Attack On Invasion Port NEW DELHI. Indiai April Kt resses in their Fire of an undetermined origin broke nut shortly after noon today in a house near Sixth street on i Orange avenue, causing 'complete destruction of the roof and the interior. The house was owned by Mrs. Oriola Noriega. Furniture from the living and dining rooms was re- moved after .being slightly dam- aged by water. The single roof collapsed soon after the fire broke out. leaving two brick chimneys standing unsupported. These were toppled by heavy streams of water from the fire hoses. Some damage was also nearby houses, in which the blister- ing heat cracked windows, and ruined paint. The fire was brought under control by'city and volun- teer firemen, who worked from botli sides of the house, playing twin streams of water on the roof. No one was injured. Orgdnization third major raid in the India-Burma War theater heavily attacked the great Japan- e.se invasion base at Rangoon Thursday night. United States AJr in India announced SACRAMENTO, April 38 The arrival of pretty Leona Men- ier today brought to four the num- ber of defendants in jail here on charges they were members 'of the isolationist Friends of Pro- gress group in Los Angeles and failed to register as members of a subversive organization. A Churchill Aids Churchill Funds Raised For First U.S, Flier To Bomb Tokyo AUBURN, TT Y., April 18 (U.R1- Joseph Doran, veteran at World War I, said today he had collect- ed more for the pifot of the.first American plane to bomb Tokyo and that hc expected'the fiiiui would reach Maj. John Strange Spencer Churchill, having served with distinction in South African and European fighting, today assists his brother, Primn Minister Win- lion C'luriiiHj; on home Irout.. Final plans- for' the W'ir Bund and Stamps pledge campaign wore completed (Jus week, and .the j will get under way in the business district Monday, it today bytMrs.'fSyelyn man of the Yuma county defense savings staff. j Mrs. Smith suggested that mem-j bers of the families should discuss the manner in which they will fill the pledge, so that a minimum of: time will be used by the canvassers.! and pledges will not be duplicated by different members of the fanii- j ly. Businessmen are uko reminded! that the stickers they will.receive when they sign the pledges should be placed in their home windows, j so that canvassers will know that: family has already pledged. Business districts will be covered during the first two days, and can- vassing in the residential areas will take place later in the week. i headquarters today. Docks and harbor installations at the great Burmese' port, near which -10 Japanese transports with tens of thousands of fresh Jap- anese troops were reported three days ago, were .showered with heavy bombs. Planes Undamaged The giant American p lanes flew through heavy enemy' antiaircraft gun fire without damage to planes or personnel. It was the second big Ameri- can Fortress raid on the niost dangerous invasion base in this area of the war. On the night of April 3 the Fort- resses under Maj. Gen. Lewis H. Brcreton, commanding, had at- tacked the Rangoon, started three great fires, and re- turned with all planes and all men safc jat Bcrchtesgadcn. NEW CABINET COMPLETED BY LAVAL Retains 3 Posts In Government Which He Heads VICHY, April 18 Henri Philippe Petain today in- augurated a changed form of gov- ernment for France with Pierre Laval as chief responsible to Pe- tain and. with Admiral Francois Darlan as Petain's heir apparent in supreme command of all arm- ed forces. (The German radio said that the new Vichy regime was a Petain- Laval-Darlan government. Dis- paTches from not com- pletely clarify whether pro-axis Laval would be the chief power in the new government as had (Continued on Page 3) STATE K.C. CONVENTION OPENS HERE Banquet Sunday Night; Business Session Monday Initial sessions of the 35th an- nual Knights of Columbus con- vention will be held today, with registration starting at the San Carlos hotel at 1 o'clock. Dancing and a floor show are scheduled for tonight at the In- ternational Club in San Luis. Com- munion Mass for candidates and members will be held Sunday at 'the Immaculate Conception church [with the candidates being served i breakfast at the Valley cafe fol- lowing the mass. Second degree will he held at 1 p.m.. followed hy a luncheon and entertainment at Clymers. A scenic drive is planned ladies at with the third degree held at At" the convention banquet will be held at the Elks club. Business Meeting Monday On Monday there will be a mass for deceased members. The state council will meet at the Elks club at 10. with a luncheon and cards for the ladies scheduled at the Del Sol at The program ;for .the banquet Sunday ;night __ Toastmaster. .Isaac Polhamus. Invocation. Rev. Arthur Valle. Welcome. L. B. Moran. Spanish-.Songs, Charro Alvarado Welcome to Bru- ncau. PiaVio Screwballs, Gene and Whitcy. "Our L. J. Felix. "When Irish Eeycs Are fimil j ing." Loonard MeKeough. i (Continued on Pagr-1) Japan Admits Fires Started At Two Of Its Biggestjities Washington Says It Has Had No Confirmation of Attack; Official Word Believed Withheld Until Ships Return WASHINGTON, April The army and navy had no con- firmation today of official Tokyo radio reports that the Japanese capital had been bombed by "Al- lied" planes for the first time in the war. But unofficial sources believed the United Nations, notably the United States, are well-equipped to carry out such a raid either by sea or land based planes. They pointed out that: 1. An American task force early in .March raided Mnrc.ns island, enemy base only 930 miles from Japan's biggest port, and that a similar force of aircratt carriers, cruisers anil protecting destroyers ronlll have slipped within strik- ing distance of the island kingdom. 2. Tokyo would be within casv range of giant bombers based on secret airfields alcng the China coast. A raid of this kiml would require les; daring than vras lUsplayiMl by army airmen in last week's inlliv hop, skip anil "bomb-heU- out-of-'cm" attack on Japanese BY UNITED PKESS Japan announced today that Al- lied planes, taking the war to Japan for the first time, had bombed Tokyo, the world's third city, and the industrial and naval base cities of Yokohama, Kobe and Nagoya. (Tokyo Radio in a Chinese-lan- guage broadcast recorded by CBS in Kan Francisco, identified the planes as American.) airplanes raided Tokyo for the first the radio said.) Admit Fires Caused After hours 'in which it assert- ed first that no damage had been done and then that damage was slight. Tokyo admitted that in- cendiary bombs had caused fires at Nagoya and Kobe, two of Japan's greatest cities. It was said that the Allied planes machine gunned villages in the attack area. The attacks extended over a 275 mile area of the south coast of Honshiu, the main Japanese islnml. along which all Japan's greatest cities are strung. BULLETINS! SAN l-'KANCISCO, April IS (U.Ri---Tin- army today ordered three hirgc. Los Angeles areas cleared oj .Japanese, by April 28 in Hie latest .exclusion or- ders iinitounced by the War- time Civil Cnnlrol Adminis- tration. The orders affected Japanese, both aliens and American The proclamations Issneif by Lieut. Gen. .John L. De- Witt, head of the Western De- fense Command, set April '-'I and 2'i as dates for those af- fected to report at civil con- trol centers to make arrange- ments for leaving their homes April 27 and 28 by hns and train for the recep- tion center in Owens valley. These sources believed that the undoubted effect of such a foray on the Japanese people, plus what- ever material damage to Nipponeai j war industries resulted, would justify the risk. The war department said it 'lia'd I "no confirmction" of the reported attack. The navy said merely th'it jit had "no official I If Allied planes did raid Tokyo. i it was felt that it wimkl hi- several days or weeks boforo any official word is given out from lii-ie. lirlirvril .Naval Crnll Must felt that if the I Tokyo raiib reports mi the homb- int; raid aiv authentic, the attack- ing planes most likely were U. S. naval craft operating from or 'more carriers from waters close ID the island kingdom. j They pointed out that the Jap- an; se reportedly have a sizeable j naval force in the Indian ocean and that the remainder of its fleet un- j douUedly is spread out guarding j the extended supply lines to the Southwest Pacific. I World's Largest Submarine Overdue, j Considered Lost Big British Bombers Germany, Augsburg Raid Far Into Works Attacked LONDON, April IS Britain revealed today that it had sacrificed seven of a fleet of. 12 giant Lancaster bombing planes to make a daring dusk raid yes- terday on Augsburg1, far inside Germany and only 110 miles from Adolf Hitler's once-safe retreat Brcreton himself piloted his flag- ship. Mrs. Whitney Dies Of Heart Ailment NEW YORK, April 18 Gertrupe Vandcrbilt Whitney, about 63, mistress of two palaces rind a great fortune, mother of a famous son, and possessor" of con- siderable artistic'talent, died to- riav heart disease.. Four of the planes were shot down south of Paris; three more crashed to earth in the target area. Huge, riant Attacked But the planes bombed the great Maschinefabrik-Augsburg- Nuremberg works, popularly call- ed the man makes the Diesel motors for German sub- marines. It was from Augsburg lhat Ru- dolf Hess, Hitler's heir, took off to fly lo Great Britain, where he has' since been imprisoned. The'raid was made while it was still light but the-British planes, j intent on destruction, attacked I from low level and two dived to 200 feet above the sprawling- works to drop their bombs and see them burst fairly in the tar- get. Bombed at 8 I'. M. was just after 8 p.m.. when the planes dropped their bombs. The five survivors landed at their bases well before midnight. While the Lancnstcrs were fly- ing .homeward, a great force of British planes went over to bomb I Hamburg. Germany's greatest anil j moat-bombed port. This was the seventh day of j Britain's greatest and most for- oclons aerial offensive of the war. (Continued on Page 4) SA.CRAMKNTO. April Culbert Olson today invited California Sheriffs. board of supervisor chairmen, local (li-fcusi; council chairmen and county farm commission- ers to meet in Sacramcntu next Frday to coordinate plans for establishment of mi'ii "Sharpshooters" in the stale militia. UHIXfiKINfi, April IX (UR) who had SIM-II their IIHMI, women anil child- ren dead, mangled and bleed- ing in tin- streets after Jap- anese air raids and wistfully wondered when Japan would In; paid back, rejoiced roihiy in reports that Tokyo had IHMMI biimbed. Japanese reports of lhi- at- tacks threw Chungking into tin- greatest uproar since tin' outbreak of war. April (U.B__The Japanese apparently have captured C'elm, si-roml largest rlt.v In riiillppim's, a war department said t inlay, LONDON. April IS IU.R) The .Fiv.e French submarine Snrconf. .the world's largest submarine, is :considerably overdue and must be ;considered lost. Free French head- 1 quarters announced today. No. 1 Mother, '42 To Mrs. William N. Greensboro, N. C., sues the honor of being named "Hie American Muthui ol 1DJ-' by llic-tioldni Kulc l-'uuniljlion. I he mother ol 13 children. Mrs. i has helped her husband i build ti wuUtiiule cuul buoincs-.-. Tokyo had an air raid alarm period1 extending from shortly be- fore noon to around 4 p.m. Thr alarm was sounded through- out the Japanese, island group [mm Hokkaido in the far north to To- huko and Kyushu in the south- west. Admission that the Allied phnt'-. had used incendiary bombs meant that Japan for the first time had been hi ought face to face with deadliest peril mass fires aiming the flhnr.ily built homos of wnoil paper which form large parts of her cities. Central defense headquarters 'it 'Tokyo said fires at Nagoya and Kobe had been brought under con- trol by -I p.m. Iloinhs at fl Places H paid incendiary bombs had i bcfi: dropped at six places "in the i vicinity of" .Nagoya and that throe places at Kobe were hit with fire bombs. Japan ami all the world had .every city ln.it was vulnerable to bomb attacks and thnt aftei i tin first enemy plane had flown over country its people would mver. so long as the war lasted. another night ferling securiv Tokyo asserted that nine Allied p'n.nes had been shot down by in- toixeptor planes in the vicinity of ci.--wiied, fire-fearful Tokyo with its 7.000.000 people. City Caught Unaware Broadcasts which spoke of Ihousriniis strolling the streets ulun the air raid alarm sounded. just before Allied planes began flying over Tokyo from all direc- tions, indicated that the city was 'ca-.isht completely unaware. Tokyo said that noon-day rush kept on their way as diil irais and buses, thinking thai .t was a piactice alarm. Emphasizing- Japan's constant fear fot the safety of its Emper- or Hirohito. whom it believes to i bt- a more than human descendant i of goddess of the Sun. Tokyo j went out of its way lo announce thai the imperial family was -..-ell." Th.re had neon no report cf tin indisposition to any member of it. BULLETIN! April IK inrii and I'O'i- gri'sslunul leau'rr-i tnilay hiill- i-d thr rrportrd Immbinjr of Tiik.vn anil oilier Important .lapanrsi- Industrial irati-rx us liuruliliiiK thf- start a real nfCrnslvK.   

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