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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - April 14, 1942, Yuma, Arizona                             HIE WKATHKK AT HIM A by II. 8. Highest last 24 hours 87 Lowest last 24 hours 05 Average high this dale 85 Average low this date FORECAST Cloudiness late thtt Uter- 'veiling, Wednesday fall'. ..res about the same. VOLUME 88 YUMA. ARIZONA TUESDAY. APRIL 14, 1942 THE YUMA ARIZONA s. V VOLUME II W w ww _ LAVAL RETURNS TO POWER IN FRANCE YUMA NURSE CHOOSES FIERY DEATH Mrs. J. Waidler, Despondent, Sets Fire to Clothing Mrs. Aletha B. Waidler, about 50 years old, long-time Yuma resi- aent and ma.-.'--, diuU early this morning in the Yuma General hos- pital ns a result of burns suffered last evening when she saturated her clothing with gasoline and then applied a match to it. Mrs. Waidler had been making her home with Mrs. Joe Ward at 272 Fourth Avenue, and at about o'clock, in the absence of Mrs. Ward, went to the hack 3'ard and made the suicide attempt. Mi's. Ward's son reported to Joe Rcdondo, deputy sheriff who in- vestigated. that Mrs. Waidbr went into the kitchen, apparently to se- cure some matches, then to the back porch where she found the gasoline and splashed her clothing with it. She then went down the steps to the back yard and set fire to herself. Immediately shr. was enveloped in flames. Two passing soldiers, attracted by the commotion, rushed to Mrs. Wimllcr, stripped off their shirts and smothered the flames. Had this action not been taken, it is said, the woman would have been even more severely burned. Physician Summoned A physician was hurriedly sum- J. H. Smallwood 41, in Yuma 20 Years, Dies Definite funeral have not yet been made for James Hattington Smallwood. 41, colored, a resident of Yuma for the past score of years, w ho died at his home at 129 N. 10th avenue early this morning. Services will, how- ever, be held from Johnson's mor- tuary. Smallwood was born in Chicago. and altho but a youth at the time of United States' en try into the World War, he served with the army for some months before the armistice. For some time he ha_s been em- ployed by the E. F. Sangninetti firm as a janitor. He had been ill since', late last year. Close surviving relatives are the widow, one daughter, Sarah, aged and a brother. KNOX URGES 40-HOUR WEEK BE RETAINED Says Abolition Would Delay War Program- WASHINGTON. April 14 Secretary of Navy Frank Knox declared today that abolition of the basic 40-hour work week would result in "confusion and delay" in ____________ JiiB Deputv_ _the before MTsTWaid- Knox "tolcTTiouse naval affairs committee that the labor situation loi- was taken to the hospital. She was conscious and said repeatedly to the deputy: "I'm still living but I'll soon Continued on Page 2 Employers Urged To Open Doors To Older Workers could be improved, but said the problem was one of psychology. He cited the "amazing" increase i production after Dec. 7 to substan tiate that statement. Prefers Tax .Method Knox also told the committee he PLAN BOND PLEDGE CAMPAIGN Each Resident to Be Asked to Buy Stamps Regularly Initial plans were laid out yes- terday for the War Bonds and Stamps pledge campaign which will open next week, at a meeting in the Yuma County Chamber of Commerce offices. Governor Sidney P. Osbom in a recent proclamation designated the week of April 20-25 as Arizona Pledge Week. During- that week Arizonans will take part in a nationwide program for. voluntary purchase of defense stamps and bonds. Will Contact All The Yuma County Defense Savings Staff, through its work crs, will contact. every prospective bond and stamp purchaser during the week. The Yuma area will be divided into several districts, with workers assigned to each district They will contact all persons in that district, and urge them to fill out pledge forms, a fascimile of which appears in this issue of The Daily Sun. The purpose of this drive is to impress on eveiy per- son in the nation the necessity of purchasing- stamps and bonds for the successful prosecution of the war effort. Records will be. kept of those who fail to sign, the pledge cards. Those Attending Attending the meeting in which the plans were formulated were Mrs. Evelyn eha'Irmnn of the Tuma County Defense Sav- ings Staff, A. N. Kelly. E. C. Byrd. John Nankervis, C. B. Andrews, George Wilson, and R. E. Jee. Jr. Others on the committee who were unable to attend the meeting were W. H. Westover and James B. Rolle of Yuma. Waltice Ham of Don Ingham Is Elected Commander of VFW; Post Has Membership of 111 Don E Ingham was loney. Vcrnon C. Wright. Curtis 0 T rMirfnf.i commander of the Sunshine Cap- ital [lost of the Veterans of For- eign Wars last evening at the an- nual election of officers meeting. Other officers elected were: Curtis II. Kcene. senior vice eommamfcr; A. O. Williamson, junior vice commander: A. J. Ed- dy, judge advocate; Dr. R. R. Knotts, surgeon; S. E. Foote, chap- lain; John L. Flood, quartermas- ter. Delegates named to the state department encampment to be held in Yuma May 6-9 were Rus- sell S. New, Byron R. N'ash, S. E. Foote. Ernest Wagner, Roy Loos- H. Kcene, John L. Flood, Clifford 13. Edwards. R. Miller, C. B. Andrews, C. M. Bail- ey, Al Kidcn, A. J. Eddy, Cliff Newman, K. K. Surber, H. H. Baker. L. K. Murphy, J. J. Hoyt, Hilmer Haupt, George J. Duke. Quartermaster Byron Nash re- ported the post now has 111 paid up members, the largest member- ship for some time. Ralph Garcia was initiated as a new member. Plans for the state encampment were discussed. Following the regular post ses- sion members enjoyed a feed with ier, A. O. Williamson, E. U Ma- j members of the Auxiliary. House Approves Joint Memorial Urging Military Road To Gulf PHOENIX, Ariz.. April to congress asking curbing of pro- _ joint memorial, stressing the fiteering and strikes, advantages of locating war Indus-1 Bill Approved tries in' Arizona, was introduced; The house approved, with no dis- today in the house of representa- j scnting votes, a bill appropriating lives at the special session of the; for improvements to the na- WASHINGTON', April M (U.Ri Prrsiilent Roosevelt called on Am- j -critiin employers today "to open their doors to older a means of speeding the "gigantic war production program in which we are engaged." i 1Q In a proclamation setting aside the week beginning May as Na-1 tional Employment Week, Mr. i Roosevelt urged that particular at- tention be given to the employment of the older workers, especially j veterans of the last World War. j Mr. Roosevelt also invited the j attention of private industry to j the necessity of training and em-: ploying women as well as older, men. preferred to recapture excessive in- dustrial profits by a heavy excess profits tax rather than hy limit- ing projects on war contracts to n specific percentage. As far as the navy is concerned 1 there is no need for labor legis- j lation at this time, Knox said. He added that increasing th sic work w from 40 to -l hours, approved in a bill by Chair- man Carl Vinson. O.. Ga.. wa> merely a means of reducing wage.' BULLETIN! WASHINGTON, April Laval's rcappoint- nicnt to the Vichy cabinet to- brought renewed demands in congress for American seiz- ure of nil French territory con- sidered necessary for the war effort. 15th legislature. tional guard armory at Prescott. The memorial was addressed to i A joint memorial, introduced by Donaid Nelson, War Albert W. Dudley of Yuma. ask- U. S. and Mexican officials make arrangements for con- Board chairman. Legislative action in the war: to emergency program in the house struction of a highway from San and senate yesterday was confined Luis, near the Arizona border, to to committee hearings, the passage the Gulf of California was also of two minor bills by the house: iipprovecl. The highway_ wouldI _be and appointment in the senate of. intended primarily for military ust a committee to draft a resolution. in event of invasion. U.S. FORCES RESISTING ON CEBU Greatly Outnumbered Defenders Continue Battling Invaders WASHINGTON. April 14 Greatly outnumbered American- Filipino forces on Cebu island in the Philippines, living up to the example set in Bataan. are stub- bornly resisting Japanese invas- sion troops in "heavy fighting." the war department announced to- day. It was the first reporl from op- erations on Cobu since radio communications from that island went dead last week end. To- day's army communique said briefly that "communication with Cebu has been re-established.' ran Breaks Off Relations With lapanese Gov't TEHRAN, Iran. April M- ran severed diplomatic relations Japan today. The. Iranian cabinet. In closed cssion. deckled on the diplomatic break after disclosure that the 'apaiifsc legation in Tehran has }een acting as a center for axis propaganda and subversive acti- vities, aimed at the Iranian gov- ernment and the Allies. The On .Mindanao communique also told of operations in Mindanao, south of Cebu. This gave further evidence that American-Filinino resistance in scattered areas of the Philip- pines is by no means ended, de- spite the fall of Bataan and the close siege of the Manila bay forts. Corregidor gunners, already fa- mous for their deadly aim. train- ed their bigt guns yesterday two Japanese Japs Claim Prisoners Taken With Capitulation of Bataan Forces TOKYO. April those captured, the communique Broadcast -Recorded .By (U.PJ In said. The balance were Filipinos. San Francis An imperial headquarters communique tonight declared 40.000 American and Kil- were taken of ipino war prisoners with, the capitulation of forces Maj. Gen. Jonathan M. wright on Bataan peninsula. (A war department communique originally fixed the number of American- and Filipino troops on the peninsula at but :'..50n marines and sailors were known to have escaped to Corregidor.) Art- Americans There were 6700 Americans, including 12 high officers, among Somerton, Mrs. E. V. Haydcs of Salome, and K. O. Mason of Park- er. CLARKDALE MAN PLEADS GUILTY TO MURDER COUNT PRESCOTT, Ariz., April. 14   CUIILIUI [I! H-C.T, "B---------- savings. It. would freeze wages. Mr. Roosevelt that income from general prices and rents. in de- i wages, farm products, interests fcHsc areas, as of a date yet to be i and dividends has increased since the depression era. Increased prices and taxes enter his pica. Austin said he kill- ed Carpenter because he was hav- ing illicit relations with Mrs. Aus- tin. Judcje "icon set tile time for sentencing at 10 a. in. Friday. Gather For Annual Arizona Pioneers Reunion PHOENIX, Ariz., April ---The people who more than half a century ago had faith in the fu- ture of an untamed, arid country --Arizona's pioneers gathered here today in their 21st annual reunion to relive and retell the of the past. More than 2000.of the oldtimers, residents of the state who arrived before. Dec. 31, 1890, came from all parts of the state to attend the day-long ceremonies. discussed last evening at a ing of the Education. Human Re- sources and Skill committee of the Yuma county defense coun- cil. It was brought out in the dis- cussion that such discs would ex- jcdite rescue work in case of a disaster in any of the schools. After discussion it was voted to determined. Problem Unsolved be The major problem yet to solved is the control of excess pur- have taken of that. If prices and wages are frozen chasing power. Present plans are at present levels, and consumer to divert it into savings-cither luxuries are restricted, there compulsory or voluntary pur- chase bonds, there influential government offic- would be no place to spend the except through "Black Markets" that would ere-i jnr. ]niiiieiii.iii! gvvi.1 tola favoring each method. The ate a form of inflation decision Is up to Mr. Roosevelt. Approval of manufacturers as jvcl! as consumers and labor Is That's where the voluntary or compulsory savings program comes in. BULLETIN! SAN FRANCISCO, April It Admiral Luke Mc- Namec, president of MncKay KiiUlo and Telegraph Co., to- dny announced the of a Hew direct rkdlo-tclcgraph service IwtH'ecn the MaxiKay nullo station linrc mid the AmiilRamatcil wireless station; near Sydney, Australia. rain than over forces. American military tie for control of Manila the finest harbor in the Far Eas continues. So long as Corrcgido holds out the bay is of no use t the Japanese. Its guns contro the entrance and. while ammuni lion lasts, they can make it long on any enemy vessel attemplin to pass through the narrow cliai nel. Youth4entenced To 8-15 Years On Robbery Charge fr .ludsc Henry C. Kelly yesterday scnlrnccd Harry Howard Maser. to serve .a term of not less i eight nor more than in the state penitentiary. AXIS FRIEND NAMED VICE PREMIER Also Given Post Of Interior" Minister Allies Alert As Laval Returns To Power in France LONDON, April 14 British official spokesman said to- day that Pierre Laval's return to power at Vichy was very grave news, and Allied governments were tensely on the alert in the belief that France was passing through a crisis of world moment. Disposition of the French fleet, the possibility that French North African colonies might aid the Germans in Libya, threat of a Vichy attack on Free French Af- rican territories, a possible Jap- anese bid for Madagascar, the French island off Southeast Africa which dominates a vital Allied Indian ocean supply route; the danger that Vichy might concede Germany submarine bases in its colonies and the future of Vichy- United States relations became urgent matters. 1'ri'ssurf Increased -Germany had put Marshal Hen- ri Philippe Petain under increas- ingly irresistible pressure to make up his mind, at once whether to cooperate fully-with the axis. As part of the pressure, the German forces in Occupied France had restarted executing allegcf terrc'iists and had threatened to shoot innocent hostages unless I men responsible for sabotage and attacks on German soldiers wore caught. The border between Occupied nnd Unoccupied France had been closed and London dispatcher from the Swiss frontier reported that the entire French border had been hermetically closed. VICHY, France. April relations with the allies reached a critical stage tonight when Pierre Laval, arch advocate of axis collaboration, returned to power in the cabinet and the gov- erment issued-- but later withdrew A charge that the United States had "insulted" France. The statement said France "re- jected" Sumner Wells' reply to a French protest over establishment of an American consular office in the free French, town of Brazz'a- ville, West Africa. Then, 30 min- utes later, the statement was with- drawn and the government cabled dispatches regarding the state- ment "killed." Laval, succeeding Admiral Jean Francois Darlan as vice premier, assumed control of the national police which he had long sought: Darlan was stripped of minis- terial rank but remained chief of the defense forces and official heir to Marshal Henri Philipp'c Petain. the 85-year-old chief of state. He thus remains in con- of the French fleet. I'uelicu Loses Post Pierre Pucheu lost his post as interior minister. The change came, after terrific German pressure on Vichy for full co-operation, in a dramatic ovef- (Continued on Page 2) Rise of Laval Seen As Marking Serious Crisis THREE HURT IN TRAfflC_ ACCIDENTS on charges of robbery. Maser was nnestcd i 16 by officers near King-man after la i tinning 40-mile gun battle. He I and another youth were returned i to Yuma. where Maser admitted of i.lames H. Piar of New Orleans.! whom they had picked up in Houston. Texas, earlier in the BULLETIN! WASHINGTON, April I K. (luthric, re- signed chii'f War I'ro- iliii'linn I'.imnl's textile divi- sion, charged today before Ihc1 senate committee- investigat- ing the wir program that members (if bis .staff bud trircl deliberately "to clrlay conver- sion of some of the largest consumer goods industries" war work. WASHINGTON'. April 14. fll.B Diplomats dared not speculate to- day on the effect the appoint- ment of Pierre Laval as vice pre- mier in charge of foreign and in- terior affairs in the French gov- ernment n-.ight have on Ameri- can-French relations. They were in nffrceiiH'iil. how- ever, that the Vichy reports of collaborationist Laval succeeding Admiral Charles Francois Darli.iu marked a scricua crisis in French policy and cue that could not but have 'important rep.-rrussit.irj among the United Nations. The first question asked by those informed of tin- report.-. today: "Is there any inclira- .tien that the nxis may get I French But the Vichy ri- I pin Is did "ot indicate any innncd- I iate change in that situation, only that Darlan would retain his post I as national defense minister. which occurred I Two accidents yesterday afternoon caused injuries to three persons, one of whom is still in an emergency hospital. the sheriff's "-e isk the principals of the various schools of the county to consider the proposal and to assist in mak- ing a decision on it later. Members of the committee also voted to secure official U. S. war films for showing in the schools of the county. Chairman L. T. (Curlcy) Rouse welding truck he was driving over- presided over last evening's meet-' turned on U. S. Highway SO about ing. pin. Sheriff T. H. Newman left for j Florence this morning with Maser. where the youth will be placed in State Supreme Court Rules Drunk Driving Evidence Sufficient To Sustain Manslaughter Charge it was reported at office this morning. I Ralph M. Greer was knocked) unconscious and suffered numer- i ous cuts and bruises when the! with members Charles Gil- 1 10 miles east of Yuma, at about L. C. Diugess, Mrs. Gwyneth Ham, Mrs. Nellie Hammond and Mrs. O. J. Lovett also attending. Present also were A. O. William- son, general county defense chair- man, and C. L, Gleason, a mem- ber of the puolic relations com- mittee. .'Commendable work has been done -by this committee in con- ducting waste paper activities. p.m. Greer was taken to Dr. C. A. Eaton's emergency hospital where he was still under a doctor's' care this morning. No other car was involved. The truck is owned by the Tanner Construction com- The Arizona Supreme Court yesterday ruled that proof that the. driver of a car which inflict- fatal injuries to a person was intoxicated is sufficient evidence to sustain a charge of man- slaughter, in a unanimous decision written by Chief Justice C. J. Lockwood. i The case wax put t" Hie court Allied Bombers Score Hit On Ship at Rabaul CBN MacARTHUR'S QUARTERS, Australia. April 14 Sebastian Ponce. Ponce is charg- pany. Three c second accident, w ars were involved in the hich occurred on Avenue B near the Central canal ____ in the Yuma valley. According to making stamp sales, going on the the report at the. sheriff's office radio with education for defense I Castro, driving- a light pick- up truck, was pushing a sedan driven by Cccllo Murillo, when the roar of Castro's" truck was struck (Continued on Page 2) skits, and assisting In the man- agement of trade schools, which have been well attended In, this community. by the super! HEAD-1 county, in the ir court of Yuma ef the state vs. (U.R) -Allied bomber squadron." attacked Japanese bases again to-, fugio Perez clay after a series of raids In which I night. ed with the hit-rim killing of Re- last Christmas ating a motor upon the public highway while under the of intoxicating liquor collides with a thereon, causing injur- ies to said person from which very shortly dies, ipso facto estab- lish the commission of man- slaughter, there being no further or ailiiitii-nal proof of the ninn- :ier of the operation of the motor vehicle, on the manner of the ool- which was cited by The I'.mrt decided that the ques- tion had already been answered in a handed down in previous cas United States Flying Fortresses bombed the ship at Kabnul in what Glenn Copple. jr., Joe U Green. John U. ly jr., and Mary Wuppermnn aiv case 'liolle.' cases cited hy the dofomlant were Wise- in no way similar to the pivMent that would do much to compen-1 attorneys for the defendant, sate for the most recent British: (Jiirstlini Involved naval loss In the Indian ocean. A direct hit nnd two tliinuiffinfr near missus were scored. The question, us stated by the trial court was as follows. "Does pi oof that dii accused while opt r- Thf unlawful act which tlir state contends com- mitted was the upi'iatlon of motor vehicle while nmlfr th. in- riunu.-c ot ii'.tiixii-atms luiuoi.   

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