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Yuma Daily Sun: Friday, April 15, 1938 - Page 1

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   Yuma Daily Sun, The (Newspaper) - April 15, 1938, Yuma, Arizona                             Today's News TODAY ...While It Is News... THE YUMA DAILY SUN And THE YUMA ARIZONA SENTINEL Mtatfi TODAY By Full LtaieJ VOLUME 89 YUMA, ARIZONA FRIDAY, APRIL is, 1938 THE YUMA ARIZONA 89 WIRE FLASHES liy United 1'rt'ss 18 IN CRASH CAIRO ftlghtcvn persons wort' killed fiiul IH injured today In 11 collision of a railroad workers train and a lurry loaded with high- way laborers near Suez. MINI-; FATAL CH1CO. C'al. --Collapsing Um- bers in a of a mine in the Feather river region were blamed Imliiy for tho death of E. O. Cul- len, mint: operator. IIKI.D AS ItlllU.I.AK SACIlAMIsNTO, Cal. Police hold Hi yoar old Robert Scolchle.r nf HiMio. Nuv., today, asserting hi: ronft'SKed 10 daylight burglaries in which he obtained more than from Sacramento homes. NATIONALIST TROOPS REACH SEA Leaders Confident Pum Will Priming Prog. Be Passed Enjoying One on the House Cal. Kix'd L. Down- ey, former postmaster at Mil roc, C.i I., freed by federal auth- oriliu.i today after a Jury in United .States district court here acquitted him of charges of em- bezzling postal funds. S. IHKKCTOU WASHINGTON Archibald A. .San Francisco, a.skcd the ir.'i'ji..ta'Lu commission today for permission to serve as officer and director of the 'South- i'in Pacific Co. and affiliated roads. .MKKTS CITY Tho an- nual convention of tin; Southwest difcli id of the American associa- tion for health and physical edu- cation continued here today with general sessions and l.'l .sec- tional scheduled before the adjournment .Snliirdny. CAIUNKT HI'IJT KCMOKKI) TOKYO Reports of an im- pending cabinet reorganization were circulated today as Japan faced reverses in the Cliine.se war and one of (he most critical times in her modern history. HUNT MAN" ANNlKTON.-.Alu. --Sheriff W. I1. CVUcM illPHiipi-cd a pospc of "wlM man" hunters today and re- ported that an all day search for a HtnitiRo Korllln-HUe family in ri Choeeoloeco valley swamp was in vain. Coiton led a tfroup of farm- ers and c iti into the swamp after rural residents reported see- ing a tiKin, woman and child whose bodies were covered with hair and who at times walked on all fours. SINGERS PRESENT PROGRAM AT 20-30 SUPPER MEETING The. supper meeting of the Yu- ma club members in Cly- mer bouse last night was featur- ed with entertainment by the Roll in IVase singers. Clifton L. Hark ins, president, officiated at the meeting, and Mr. and Mrs. William Westovcr, Kd Odlc of Los Angeles, and Al Fraucnf old- er of Yuma, were club guests. The club will be in char- go (f Kiwanis club luncheon program in I ho Masonic Temple next Thursday noon, it was an- nounced. and the usual supper moe.t ing of the organ i linn will not be held on that night. Hospital I 'alien Is discharged from I he V in in 11 Ctoncral hospital were an- nounced today noon as follows: Mian Sybil Woforcl. of Ihe Hluehird Auto Court, was admit- ted April D and discharged yes- terday. James Clack of Bard was ad- mitted April and discharged April 15. linby .Jack (Jill, son of Mr. and Mrs. jofiquin (.iill of North Oiln valley was admitted April J) and discharged todny. Baby Isaac Kucrta, three old son of Mr. and Mrs. August inn I hmrta of Andrade was admitted April 7 and dis- charged today. Val Melton of Hard WHS admitted April 8 and discharged Ijday. WILSON Press Stuff WASHINCTON. April 15 (U.R> -President Roosevelt today dedi- cated his depression lending-spending campaign, back- ed by of potential credit expansion, to distributing prosperity among :ill the people. To that end. he shot millions of Idle flold into the credit spending pool and notified congressmen last in a fireside chat to their r'nis-'JlneiU-. th.'it br a wages and hours bill passed at this .sc.sHion. Leaders Ounfhlritt Congressional leaders were con- fident that the new recovery pro- rnuhl be enacted, thirst sur- veys of congressional .sentiment revealed opposition in pump prim- :ng tactics, but less strong thnn that which finally junked the gov- ernment bill last week. Congressmen are coming up for re-election this fall and they lih'jly to vote for anything that promises to bring prosper- ity. In swift reversal of balance-lhe- EXPECT EASTER SEAL QUOTA TO BE REACHED SAT. Expeclation that Yuma coun- ty's quota in the Easter Seal drive, will be reached by close oC the campaign tomorrow night j wus expressed today by Mrs. W. j L. Ellison, county chairman. Nearly 70 per cent of tho I county's quota has been se- j cured and it is expected the bal- i ance will be obtained by a force j of workers who will sell the seals j in the business district tomorrow., North End I'lireporU-rt i No reports have been received us yet from the north end of UK-' j county or from the Koll-Welllon j district. Funds derived from sale of the j seals will be used by Ihe Arizona I Society for Crippled Children for i mainlenance scholarships, assist- ing crippled children taking slate; vocational education courses. i COUNCIL HEARS PLEA ON FIRST STREET PAVING Although the, proposed paving of First street as a Works Pto- gress Administration project was j not on, the city council's calender at the called session Wednesday night, municipal officials heard without formal comment a re- port by Lester LJ. Woolever that many property owner's concerned in the project were opposed to a Loyalist ;pain Cut In Two As Port Of Vinaroz Taken Offers Pupils For Best Gila ,t Project Slogan of Eleventh avenue. As the owner oC a number city lots in the vicinity of Four-I teenth avenue on First street, I There's a prize awaiting the Woolever said he did not wish to I school boy or girl in this section stand in tbe way of street im- j provcmcnt, and that neither did he wish to sec any Individual who j could not afford paving- stand to lose his property because of the I wishes of a majority. Cost: Uncertain whose slogan boosting- the Gila project is considered the best sub- mitted. m Jutjdanl over the Senate's passing of its own version of the lax bill instead'of the one previously passed by the House, the" happy huddle above shows, left to right, Senators Henry F. Ashurst of Arizona, William E. Borah of Idaho and Carl A. Hatch of New Mexico. They expressed their -glee at deleting the con- troversial undistributed profits tax and otherwise modifying the House measure. BOY SCOUTS OF YUMA DIST.TlF HAVE CAMP OUTING HERE APR. 22 Slogans must be turned in im- mediately, however, to be in the i competition. I Directors of the C-iia project, He indicated that, since the ac-1 in discussing plans for getting lo- luul cost of the not certain, but paving work is that it possibly will exceed the earlier estimates, cal residents as well as people of other parts of this stale and olther states inlereslcd in he it might be well to plan a narrow- j Clla project, decided to have i er pavement without concrete' some stickers printed calling at- I curbs and gutters. tention lo Ihe project. "I think most property owners. These stickers will be used on would like lo have the street i envelopes and literature sent out To Give Cups for Boys and Girls Show Events I budget economy plans the New Deal .snipped federal purse strings. Explaining his new strategy last night to a nationwide radio iiiuii- encc, Mr. Roosevelt called for popular support of a government strong enough to cope with "the I'orcea of. business depression." hut He said dictatorships grew out of weak and helpless govern- ments, not out of those which were strong. His chut was concil- intory with n good word for thr merchant big and little-- and the hanker who had pride in his cont- I munity. The chat and a pump-priming j in classes for boys and g message to congress which pro- Small cash prizes will perhaps ceded it moved the Roosevelt ad-1 given for the fun events ministration into its second great j of tbe cups. drive against depression. Close as- cups will be given fur a- sociates of the president said the dull competition exeepl (orgrand chat and message npened the lOISS championship pl.ic To Odd Fellows Grand Lg. Meet Members of the horse show com mittee, in charge of ararngements for the fifth annual Yuma horse show, met Inst and went over plans for the show. Among other things it was de- cided to give cups for first places boys and Plans for a district camping -yr i i period at Joe Henry Memorial IMcUttBQ park in Ynma, with Boy Scouts from the nine troops in this tiis- trict participating, were outlined i at a meeting of the Yuma dis- 1 trlcL Boy Scout committee held lust night ft the city hall. t> 1 It wus also decided to invite i Scouts from the Imperial j troops of the Imperial-Yuma ar- ea council to attend the event, which will begin next Friday night, April '22, uml conclude the following night. lie said, "but I am afraid that some will be opposed to the i program unless the costs are kept j down." aaid thai a 20-foot or "slightly wider" paving would be sufficient, and that a pavement of that kind might be approved J providing it was not too costly. I Widened At Intersections He alao advocated that tlila j paving1 be widened at intersec- tlons so lhal ears or vehicles ap- from the Yuma arcn. But what to say? Then the idea of having stu- dents compete for the prize. There's one Ihe slogan must not be over 10 words in length, and. 11 must be turned in at Ihe office of Attor- ney Hugo Fanner on or before April 22, one week from today. 10 Take Final y. lo- on A IA 111 200 In District Henry Bandy, mid-Frank Far-1 proochlnp; it from' the Intel-sec- 'TTvilTliniif iniie 111 vullev nri> nf the (Jons would not, in ttlrniiifr onto' '-'Attllllllrt tlUIIO 111 lodge of Odd Fellows to the grand u, "kick up" dirt und gravel 01 lodge convention which will he j the pavedway. held in Phoenix April 18. 19 and "That's 20. it was announced hy Noble j Grand Clyde E. Shields. A short regular business ineet.- There lire more than 200 Scouts general election campaign. Immediate res'.lltM were: I. Truiihfi-r of (il idle tfoltl "u' government ere- I (CONTINUED ON PAGE THREE) U. A. Polo Team Arrives; Plays j In Valley Today j The Universily of Arizona polo players arrived here Ibis morning and were to clash at the McDan- iel field with the McDaniel bro- thers' team tins afternoon start- ing at The university team consists of 'Charles Moss, No. 1; Boyd j son. No. 2; Guinor Hathaway, 'NO. 3; Hilly Dent, No. 4; I'ill 1 Perkins, alternate. They were ac- companied by Major Faulk. j The McDaniel team; Ed Mr- Daniel No. 1; Wilton Woods. No. 2; Ralph McUaniol, No. ;j; Ted McDaniel, No. -1. j Ribbons will be given i lo Admission I'Ve I Jerision was also reached charge 50c admission fee for Ihe 1 hree sessions of the The :'ame fee nf fiOf will be charged for single .sessions, but the same ticket will admit tin- owner to all thnv sessions. A fee of 2Hc was fixed for children. Members of Future Fanners nf America were granted permis- sinn lo run the refrrshnK-nl eon- i ei-sion on a percentage basis. Oiiiimitteeme.n expect this In In- tbe best show ever put on here. A HUNT TO BE HELD SAT. AT CITY P1 in the Yuma district. Chairman Hindle pre- instead sided at the meeting1 last night. i Other members of the committee present were: A. O, James H. Gordon, Asa Henry Frauenfelder and L. Bark- all the latter two from (ladsden. Hugh M. Wilrnx. nf fVntrn. executive of the Imperial-Yuma council, also attended. It was decided lo hold the next engineering mailer j over which I cannot pass I .said Mayor S. IngallK. ing" will be held Monday night at1 Eagles hall. Krnest Junkcn was initiated last meeting night. Jack Painter I Named Editor Of Councilman Samuel deCnr.st1, saiil thai the project, already aji- proved by the WPA, should not. fail. He left the council table lo' confer informally with Woolever. No other council action wa.i taken on the paving project. It is scheduled to be considered April 19, providing engineering details arc available at that time. Engineering work is now being rushed, and will include the fin- al estimates of cost. Final examinations in the terhiiven First Aid i .Mirse wore given lust night at the grammar school building by Dr. D. B. Mar- elms, instructor for the session. Praelir.-il tests in artificial respir- at ion. application of the digilal points of pressure to .stop bleed i ing1, the application of bandages iand llic transportation injured persons, wore included in the sub- jects covered. Kadi member of the class alternated with i Hi HKNDAVE, April troops occupied the Mediterranean seaport of lati; today, cutting Loyalist -Spain in two, Na- lioiuiliht headfjiiartcrs at Bur- gos annuimccd. The Nationalists thus severed all land communication between the provisional capital at Barce- lona in the north and Valencia and Madrid. Generalissimo Francisco Fran- co's forces were expected next to push to the north of Vinaroz com- pleting the encirclement of Tor- tosa, on the delta of the Ebro river. Capture of this city would give the Insurgents a splendid seaplane base close to the Loyal- ist territory. Many of their planer so far have been operating from the island of Majorca. The Nationalist forces advanced over three highways in the Vin-' nroz sector. (Jen. Miguel A ran da, com- the uriuy in the sector, Invited new-sim- per uccotn- piiii.vliig htm to lunch this af- ternoon hi famous fur cciiturk'H for Itn neu footli A dispatch from Barcelona dis- closed that, the grand headquar- ters of the international brigade had been transferred from Alba- southwest of Valencia, to "somewhere In This, with a dispatch that army headquarters in ".southern were being evacuated, was taken to mean that the Loyalist intend- ed to concentrale their defenses in the Culalonian and Madrid a- reas for the final phase of the war which ends Its 21st month Sun- day. The Nationalists had at their mercy the coastal road which con- nects Barcelona with Valencia. Inquest Held In Death of Mrs. lames Phillips All .small children of the com- munity are invitrd to take part nf Lh( in an faster egg1 bunt to be held tomorrow afternoon at two o'clock The Wildcat quartet will return at I be city pavilion under aus- hci-e next Friday lo play another, pices of the Yuma Elks lodge. Yuma valley team. A (lrt Abo Marcus will be in charge. Mr. and Mrs. 1C. J. Painter, of the upper Yuma valley, have re- ceived word that their son .lack Court of Honor, when boys will i Painter, sophomore student at' come up for advancement in rank. the Stale Teachers college in on May JO at 8 p. in. in Ihe high' Flagstaff, was recently elected school audilorium. editor of the weekly coll-i IVlrS Ke.ports on Oimporee. j ege publication, for Ihe ensuing Ul 1T1I tt. Executive Wilcox reported on year. the Camporee held at El Centre j -hick has been serving as assis- April -1 and 5, with boys al-: tant editor to Harry Biller this tending. He also announced plans term. Inquest wn.s being- cmniueled for tbe summer eamp in tbe San i The new editor received a afternoon by Justice of Peace.. Diego mountains, Camp Han Kcl- large majority of votes over the M- Winn into tbe dentil ol j .CONTINUEDON PAGETWO. other two contestants. Ml'-s- Phillips, tnund. ._ dead shortly before noon at her' home in the Yuma Death was believed lo be duo 1 to heart failure. Tbe body was found by u sun, i Warren, high school student, when he re turned home I his noon. It was lying" on a bed where Mrs. 'Phillips had apparently fallen af- tor suffering a heart attack. Tbe family residence is on Ave- nue B south of llth street. Surviving; are tbe hushiiml. two sons, Warren and Sam. and two ladder, made j daughters, Ailecn and Monettc. steps wired Elderly Painter Admits Killing and the "Victim of an accident" Neighbor CHJld in imaginary situations. Thiso laldne. the examination, i which the rnm-se were: ANCBLES April 15 (U.R.- .1. Iji-ntlcy. Kalph Crnn-1shcriff EiiScnc Biscailus today lonl llarolil Kmiiloli. K. announced that Charles McLacn Clark. Joseph Donovan. Lieorfre j 05 year old house painter. n. K. Paine. K. H. 1'crry. llml confessed he mistreated anil ILc I Hitchhiker Robber Sentenced From Yuma Fails in Escape Attempt. JC. C. Officials Bring Up Proposed Headquarters Change Before Council STATE PRISON, Florence, Ariz., April 15 iU.R> A murderer mid M rubber Siiwed t'heir way out 11 last nigbl and were plotting to tbe prison wall when eaplured them abnul midnight. The crun-icts were identified by retiring Warden A. J. Barnes as Tmiy Meyei.s, Yuma enmity robber serving 10 to 20 years, iiml Corbel t Slillwell. serving life fur tin- iirst-degre': niurdcr cell In t he i v. two umre to reach the outer of the cell block iiiu! were trying to fig- ure an escape through a locked door In the yard when guards, on n routine midnight clu-ckup, found them. They bad a of lumber wit.h th len. had killed Jenny Moreno, 7, and left I her body in a clump of weeds where il was found last night. 1 McLachlcn was taken into I custody nfter neighbors reported .smoke was coming from his home. Deputy .sheriffs said they found McLaehlen burning: bloody over- Plans for the ISiisli-r sunrise' alls and a child's undergarments, service to be held on Avenue H, A few minutes Inter the Mor- nl tbe rim nf (he Yuma mesa.j about five miles south of Yuma, arr being" completed by the Fed- eration of Christian Young Peo- ple, a union organization of all Christian young- people of Yuma and vicinity, federation officiiils announced. The service will stnrt about a. in. Various organizations are represented in the prognim which will be announced tomorrow. eno child's body way found. It lay in a clump of weeds only about 100 feet from McLachlen'g home. City Raids Net Tax Payments On Vend Machines and taped to the hick nf (iuards said tin sides hecausi H. Kunm-llH of Cneliiseil.v ban been smuggled to Formal luros looking to was given by the. the establishment of Yuma Conn- the reason for ies ty Chamber of Commerce nctivi- change, committee as i contemplated I nf .hi me.'i coimly. Twn liars Suwrd They sawed two bars from their ''Policy of Safeguarding Prison Ruins Indicated At City Council Meeting SO] llot.h men we i c locked in (CONTINUED ON PAGE TWO 1DAY BEFORE EASTER Bu y and Use EASTER ties in a building to be located on US 80 highway near Yunm'.s civic center on Kirst street met official city favor Wednesday night, when chnmber representa- tives were asked lo confer with j City Attorney VViilinm H. West- over regarding possible locution of the proposed new commerce building on city properly. Appearing at the special ses- sion of Ihe cily council, A. O. Brniissard. Clarence C. Dtinhar and John E. Hubcr, comprising a .special chamber committee, ex- plained I ho reloenlion and build- plan and inquired' regarding avntlablily of properly in what is termed the city's civic center. teuton For To belter represent Yuma cily and Yuma county fry locating on the avenue over which around 200.000 inter-slale privately own- ed inutur tannudllv. As proposed, an adequate struc-1 lure, architecturally designed in: keeping' with the desert region and the -100 year old history of European explorations and .settle- ment here, would be constructed. Sites Two possible sites were discuss-' ed one on a tract west of Llie city bull and on the north side, of First ulreel, and the oilier on Ihe east of the city hall ami on Ihe opposite or south side or' First slreel. Tbe expecled growlh of Yuma through the flibi project, stabil-' economic condilions through- out the nation which would slim-' ulate agricultural prosperity in Ymim's great fertile valley, and the need for the centralization ofj civic activities were considered in making" the proposal to Ihe cily.; Mnyor TngaUA and council mem- hers listened and commented fa- n PACE Fivr. Assessor Asks Persons Who Have Built New Homes To Notify Him All persons in the county who j have luiiit m-w homes, added to. or improved e.xisiting .sti'uclurtis, or hfivo moved strurtnres from one locality to another, are asked by O. .1. Lovett. enmity iisscsnor, ton notify his office. hnve listed al be said, "and have on tile iissfssnii.'iit appeared to be Ihe assessed. "Just the other day." Lnvett id, "tbe assessment roll changed to allow for a home that had been leslroyed by f i re. I happened to see a news item about', th, it, otherwise the owner still Ill new placed tbem Dlls at wliat V.'lllli would be better, bowevei1 if own- ers of tbe.se new homes would tnlk with us and check on oiir entries." l-ovcll also said Ihnl j.ons whose liome.s have lieen ilrslro.vcd flrf shnulil re- piiil i( II IIU'V are mil In Iv. be assessed for it." He pointed out that the slale law requires properly owners lo render returns to the iissessor an- nually, and urged Ihnl all persons comply with this law. Roy Ciimpbcll and K. P. Clark, deputy assessors, were named by Lovetl lo receive returns from property owners and to talk with them regarding; changes in prop- erty since the last jissessmenl per- iod. A pnlk-y of safeguarding' re- maining ruins of the old territor- ial penitenti.iry on Prison hill was indicated Weilnesilny night when the Yuma city eounril ix- (piesled Carroll M. P.niley, past emmiiandcr of the VKW posl ben. to investigale tbe cost of rehaug- ing the l.UUO puutnl ii-i.ii-tjiiri-ed that bad falh-u or been re- moved from tin- old prison celis, and wliie.h Bailey said might be carried away. "We have heard." Bailey told uncil. "that these iloors I might be taken In the northern for Yuma through the years and all time to come." Councilman Fred Freilley said he believed the old iron doors couluil he a.s also din Councilman Samuel dcCorse. "IL would In1 quite a said I'Ycdley. "Those doors are heavy, it would lake a. chain dcrru.l; such as auto tow ears have, to lift one. Some were bent when they were unhinged or fell, and would have to be Should lie a I'ark "Xothing- should be taken from the olil prison said Mayor Waller S. Iniralls. "The value purl of the county to lie used oa branch county jails being limit there. Wants To I'rotcsl "If thai is true. T want lo pro- ninjr to be recognized. It should be behalf of the Veterans an historical park and museum." The city's "occupation license" i raid on roin and vending ma- i-bines brnughl payrnrnt of fees yesterday on JO machines, con- n.'rcalion of three alleged illegal gaming devices, and the contem- plated seizure today of mechan- ical postage stamp venders. Miss Lizzie Frank, city asses- sor and ex-officio tax and license collect or. still held several ma- chines for non-payment of licens- es ami it was that cily police were to seize a number of ollirrs. Tbe of tire was not ce.m-eMie'i over tho legality of the devieo seized, but left that phase of the issue up to the police tic- lAimihuM' Hy hief Machines so were examined of i police Chief Isaac Polhamus, IU'; and if they showed "a payoff" in lest mi of Foreign Wars. "The VFVV has a wonderful picture planned for Ihe rc.'itora- tion of this historical old prison and for Ihe conversion of the old prison grounds into a museum vhich record th" growth of that old territorial institution the part it lias played in the mak-; cojn or merchandise, they were ng of Yuma are jusl now bogin-1 in office. Any type of vending- machine, su< li as stomp. gum, Tbe mayor then asked Bailey j peanut and other devices, is to investigate the costs of jecl to a quarterly occupation ins? tbe iron doors on the cell license tax of Miss Frank blocks. said. "If it is not too costly." he said j Failure of nors of the nui- the city can t'ind a to pay this license fee "I" i i the seizure.   

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