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Sun Advertiser: Thursday, May 17, 1951 - Page 1

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   Sun-Advertiser (Newspaper) - May 17, 1951, Yuma, Arizona                             WtottorotYi Highest last 24 hours...................89 Lowest last 24 hours.............61 Average high this date..............92 Average low this date............60 Relative humidity at 11 a.m. SUN- ADVERTISER SUCCESSOR TO THE YUMA WEEKLY SUN AND THE YUMA EXAMINER FOKKCAST to Friday Night: Mostly clear this afternoon, to- night and Friday. Kising tem- peratures. VOLUME 47 3-1331 YUMA. ARIZONA. THURSDAY. MAY 17. 1951 flit Ctnfj Copy NUMIER tO Ruling on Bradley 'Upheld By Solons Committee Votes 18-8 That General Needn't Till About Truman Talk WASHINGTON. May 1" (U.R) Senators investigating Gen. MacArthur's ouster voted today that Gen. Omar N. Bradley need not disclose what President Truman said in secret about the Far Eastern five days before he was fired. Thc unofficially as 18 to 8 removed any pos- sibility of contempt action against the five-star chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. It did nut cool senatorial tem- ers heated by three days of lolitical wrangling. Chairman Richard B. Russell, Ga., of I he Senate Armed Ser- Three Killed In CriKR VI lltfll BUCKEYE. May farm workers were killed instantly today and a fourth was critically Injured when their automobile and a Southern Pacific passenger train collided at a crossing two miles west of here. The car, a ID-IB sedan, was de- molished. The engine was damag ted slightly but proceeded into Phoenix under its own power. The train was en route'from 'Los An gcles to New Orleans. Buckeye Coroner Billy Meek identified two of the dead us Jose Lenzo, '50, Arlington, the driver, and Stephen Pablo, agi and address unknown. The third was not immediately identified. The fourth occupant of the cai was taken to Marlcopa County hos in Phoenix where his condi "tion was listed as critical. Investigating- officers were un able to identify him. Meek said the. collision occurro about 5 a.m. when the automobil Jailed to stop at the crossing. On of the victims was pinned in the wreckage and. the others were thrown 30-feet by the impact. Meek said R. W. Beene, Tucson, the train engineer, told him the car. approached the tracks about miles an hour and appeared ready to stop. Beene said the train was traveling 75 miles an hour. Forty feet from the crossing, he said, he realized the vehicle was not going to stop and applied the brakes. Meek said there would be no in- quest. Relations Commit ee, citing historic precedents and rulings, had defended Brad- ey. iresident's confidences, Russell said, would have been a blow at the "security of our country." The chairman inittee quarrel said had the coin- developed Air Force Planes Fly Over Yuma Armed Forces Day The sky over Arizona will echo like that of a. giant airdrome Sat- urday, May observance of the 'second Armed Forces Day. The gigantic fly-over will take in almost every city and hamlet in the whole state. Taking part.in the aerial parade will be B-50s from Davis-Monthan AFB, Tuc- "aon, Arizona, F-80s from Williams AFB, Chandler, Arizona, and the sleek F-84 Thunderjets from re cently reactivated Luke AFB Phoenix. Ariz. This will be one of the greates aerial reviews that has ever been witnessed by residents of the Cop per State. At 10 a.m. the aircraft, wil rendezvous over Tucson. Fron there they will proceed on thci; .Jong route over the State. The B-50s' route will be Tucson Phoenix, Prescott, Wlnslow. Wil Hams, Flagstaff, Blyth, Yuma Ajo. Nogales, Douglas, and the back to Davis-Monthan AFB, Tuc- son. Two flights of F-8'ls will leave Luke AFB, at 10 a.m. and will proceed over the following two routes. From Luke AFB to Pres- cott, Williams. Scligman, King- man, Topoc, Vidal, and return to fcLukc. The second flight of F-8is will 'along party lines" and that he regretted the ''puiiticiii overtone." Russell's statement angered Sen. Alexander Wiley, Wis., whose questioning raised the issue. He tnld the chairman he "resents" the charge that he was politically motivated. Wiley said that in demanding' testimony about the April 6 White House conference which preceded MacArthur's recall he sought only to "maintain thc dignity and thc power of the Senate." Asserting that the Administra- tion has no right to withhold any information needed by Congress. Wiley told committee members the question before them was whether they are "mice or men.' The sipinWili' Interrupted Broclley's testimony on Tues- day after lie had told the com- mittee that lie ami the joint Chiefs of Staff on military grounds, unanimously approved Mr. Tnmtan'H derision to fire MiU'Arthur. When it became apparent that he committee could not remove Is procedural quarrel yesterday, Bradley was excused from further estimony until Monday. Russell had ruled that Bradley need not answer Wiley's ques- ions about the private talks and Viley had appealed his decision. Wiley asserted that the senate's 'dignity (and) power" were at stake. He said no government of- 'icial has the power to "shut off" nformation that Congress needs. When a witness persists in re- using answers "ordered" by a committee, the usual procedure is .0 cite him for contempt of con- gress. But Republicans generally admitted they didn't have, the votes to overrule Russell. Yuma Needs the Panthers (AS KIMTOKIAI.) CATURDAY will be Baseball Day in Yuma. and it dc- serves widest possible support from everyone who lias Yuma's welfare and future development at heart. Baseball Day has been proclaimed in order that the Yuma area can give financial supixjrt to a worthy and important community Yuma Panthers baseball team. The Panthers are in financial difficulties and will not be able to finish the current season unless they receive help immediately. To make it easy for the community to extend this needed financial the Yuma County Sports Association is launching a one-day advanced ticket sale, on Saturday. Books of ten tickets are being sold for 57.50 each. At least of these books must be sold, If the Campaign is to be a success. The ten tickets are good for any remaining Panther home games, so that every purchaser will receive lull value for the money he invests in the campaign. This is not a campaign for donations or gifts. Aside from the fact that organized baseball fills a long-felt recreational and entertainment need in this com- munity, the existence of the Panthers is important to Yuma in other ways. First of all, it keeps Yuma "on the map" in the minds of hundreds of thousands of fans who are devoted to the Great American Game. It gives Yuma a certain stature among cities where organized baseball has its homes. It is a form of prestige that cannot be purchased any other way. Secondly, the existence of the Panthers is the most Important single reason for maintaining the city-owned Panther Park as a baseball that park it- self has already brought the San Diego Padres here for Spring training and undoubtedly will attract major league teams from the East in future years. The effect of this one factor, alone, is worth all the effort and support this community can exert. The value of having a big league baseball team come to Yuma for Spring training can hard- ly be assessed, but. it. is a well known fact that cities throughout the warmer areas of the U. S. are fighting to attract a team. Few of them, however, are as well quali- fied as Yuma from the standpoint of climate. And now, since organization of the Panthers has made possible an excellent ball park, there is no reason to believe that Yuma will not soon host a big league club. Yuma would' be foolish, at this point, to allow the Panthers to fail because of lack of support. Chinese Red Attack Fails To Collapse Allied Line Russia Challenges Assembly Right To Ban Arms Shipments WASHINGTON, May 'he vote by which the Senate MacArthur investigating com- mittee decided, 18 to 8, that Gen. Omar N. Bradley need not dis- close a confidential conversation with President Truman. Senators voting that Bradley need not answer-48: Democrats John- son. Kefauver. Hunt, Stennis, Long, Russell. George. Green, Mc- Mahon. Sparkman and Connally. Saltonstall, Morse. Flanders of N.J., Lodge and Tobcy. Senators voting that Bradle> should be ordered to talk 8: Democrats (2) Fullbright and Gillette. Republicans (6) Bridges Knowland. Cain, Wiley, Hicken looper and Brewster. (Kefauver, Cain, Green, Spark- man, and Tobey were not present but voted by proxy.) Western Union Operators Begin Strike In East PHILADELPHIA, I'a., May 17 -A strike by 7.10 Western Union operators at Philadelphia and Cincinnati, 0., shut off virtu- ally al! telegraphic service foilay in parts of Pennsylvania, New Jer- sey. Delaware mid Ohio. Operators remained on Hie job In main offices throughout the rest of the country, but there were re- ports Hint t h e walkouts in i g h t spread to Detroit and perhaps oilier large cities before the day Is over. Thousands of messages piled up in the offices at both cities where upcrvisws were swamped trying i keep a trickle of traffic flowing. The Philadelphia Local (No. 22) f the Commercial Telegraphers 'nlon. AFL, described the work .oppage as a "spontaneous demon- In protest against the sc of supervisory personnel In the 'raffle Department. Union spokesmen here and at Cincinnati ch a r g c ri supervisors vere being taught bow to handle lie machines in case the tclcgraph- rs strike July 1 for a 25 cents-air lour wage increase. Company officials denied super- 'isors were being trained to break i strike but were being schooled o take over in case of fire, flood, 1 a similar "act of God." The union said it expected slml- ar walkouts at Boston, Detroit, Syracuse, N. Y., and possibly at Cansas City, Mo., and Oakland Jalif., today. A special meeting vill be held in Chicago to discuss a strike, the union office said. FbUSHTNO, N. Y., May 17 Russia today challenged the the United Nations General Assembly to ban arms shipments o Commfmist China. The Soviets contended that sanctions could be voted only by the Security Coun- cil, where they could use the veto. Chief Soviet Delegate Jacob A. Halik launched a bitter attack on the proposed embargo, on the Unit- ed States, and on the procedure ;he UN seeks to follow as a tense meeting of the Assembly's 60-na- tion Political Committee opened to debate the embargo plan which was approved last'week by the Special Committee on Korean Sanctions. Russia. Malik said, would not WASHINGTON. May Chairman Richard B. Russell. D.. Ga., today recessed the hearings on General Douglas MucArthur's ouster participate in the consideration of any such proposal. The Senate hearings on Gen. Douglas MacArthur's proposals for Far Eastern policy and action by both houses of Congress in unan- imously demanding that the UN adopt an airtight, worldwide em- bargo against the Chinese Reds were used by Malik in his attack on American policy. "The Senate and the House of Malik said, "have hastily and with an extra- ordinary procedure adopted a de- cision designed to help the ag- gressive quarters of the U. S. to impose on the UN in committee and in the General Assembly this shameful resolution which they want to foist on the world. "General (Defense Secre lary George C.) Marshall, in his testimony before the Senate com- mittees on May 11. openly recog- nized that the State Department had exercised pressure by all means at its disposal on countries of a world war has been fostered by the U. S. ruling quarters which have sought to thwart a peacefu settlement of the Korean question trying to dictate their proposals and even voting hypocritically u favor of proposals especially the proposals concerning discussion o: China's UN representation and thi future of Taiwan. This Is now ii the public record." Antelope District To Meet Monday Patrons of Antelope Union trig! school district are invited to at tend a mass meeting at 8 p.n Monday. May 21 at Mohawk Va" ley school. Garland Wisby, president of AUHS board of trustees, has cal ed the meeting to give school di: trict patrons an opportunity to di.c cuss the bond isue of re cently voted to provide funds fo construction of the new AUH buildings. Oliver M. Frank, Southern Par (NKA T SPY ON THE Communist positions, this Marine peers through urtillcry spotting glasses from u Marine observation point overlooking Chunclion. (Exclusive NEA-Acme photo by Stall Fhotogrnplier Bert AsliwonliJ UN Forces Fall Back On Eastern Front Lea Rae Hodges Wins Annual Osborn Award for Service Thru Journalism Weinberg Freed On Contempt of Court Charge WASHINGTON. May Joseph W. Weinberg, named by the House UnAmerlcan Activities Committee as "Scientist X." was acquitted contempt of court charges today. Federal Judge Alexander Holt- zoff ruled that the suspended Uni- versity of Minnesota scientist had a right to refuse to answer ques- tions of a federal grand jury con- sidering possible perjury charges against him. Weinberg contended that his answers might incriminate Holtzoff had cited Weinberg for contempt last Friday after he re- fused to discuss with the grand jury his activities in 1943. At the time, Holtzoff tentatively ruled Weinberg should hnve answered more of the questions. These were four questions which Weinberg answered at a hearing of the House UnAmerican Activi- ties Committee two years ago. The government contended, last week that Weinberg waived his privilege Lea Kae Hotlgos, junior class student at Yumii Union high school last night was awarded the fifth annual R. E. Osborn Memorial Award for service to her school through journalism. The award was presented by Jones Osborn, publisher of t h e Yuma Sun, at last night's annual Press club banquet attended by staff members of the high school publications, their advisers a n d quests. Miss Hodgi'M last year on the editorial staff of The Ther- nometer, high school ncwspajvr. and this year is business manager El Saguaro, the YUHS year- book. Editors and lop staff members 'or the two publication.! for next year were also announced at last night's affair. Mrs.'Barbara Niul- son, Thermometer adviser, n n ndunced .that Mary Coe will be next year's editor-in-chief. Other staff members will be: Elaine Cnl lopy, school news Joyce Wayne, assistant editor; Ernie Bristow, feature editor; Margaret Jo Edwards, news editor; Betty Lou Miller, assistant news editor. Sam DcCorse, sports editor; Jim- my Rolle, advertising manager Ann Steenbcrgen, circulation; and Barbara Vomicil, business mana- ger. Mr. Niclson also presented a gift to Aiirclio Ciirvajal, this year's editor, from the members of his staff. Ralph Johnston will be the TOKYO, Friday. May force of ConnnunUts acked United Nations for'ctg all icross the 120-mile War today, but failed to he Allied line. A dispatch from the Kant On- .nil Front said a large force of southbound Reds had croiweU the ukhan and Soyang river in a gradual buildup of Round Two .of uicir spring offensive. Thty s w a r me d over and .hrough valleys, the dispatch Hid. The rent of the dispatch WH cen- sored. Allied troops fell back on the Eastern and Kant-Central rrotits. A. U. S. 8lh Army communique said these were line straightening operations, although it wa> conced- ed the enemy hud knocked a Mf hole In South Kiu'can linen In the InJR urea, ncnr the cast' coast. C h I n c H D and North Kor fulling; by lhi> under Allied artlllrry, firing Ihr rule iif urn; round every two' nilnnlcs, and homhH and nttck- lint gnu builds fired from war- liliuitut. A lute report fruni the KsiNl. Cent ml Front iwld ratlmitt- i-il enemy cmimltltx credit to artillery fire In I he. laHt two was 7, A nearly full moon Illuminated the battle field Thursday night and 12 B-2U bombers dropped DO tons of high explosive bombs on. enemy communications arid airfield tar> gets. The much publlclied Red Air Force had not made its threatened appearance. The Reds-were Ing on small arms, mortarn and Russian-type 76 millimeter' light n'cw 'adviser to'the "paper next year. Miss Shirley Schwengle, year- book adviser, announced that James Casey had been given the editorship of thc FJ Sagtiaro again next year. He is editor of this vear's hook also. Casey announc- ed that Carolyn Ham would be ills associate editor; Lea Rae Hod- business manager; and Elea- nor Berg-horn, copy editor. Principal speaker last night was Charles Southern, associate pro- essor of English at ASC Tempo. Mr. Southern's remarks concerned "words in action" and he caution- ed the high school journalists that all the "smart" remarks and "wisecracks" in high school news- papers could not make up for one broken heart caused by a careless unthinking writer. Mr. Southern in- troduced Dr. Leslie Bigelow who related two classic stories of the newspaper world. Billy Sanchez was loastm'aster, and guests included Principal and Mrs. L. T. Rouse, and Vice Prin- cipal and Mrs. L. C. Dingcss. artUlery____ There also were that in their East Central Front they were using 'rifles and millimeter howltien, ibly captured from.the earlier offensives.' The only Red breakthrough came in the Injc area. South Korean flanks were exposed and o t her iOK units were endangered; Ani- rican forces rushed Into attempt o seal the gap. In the first 24 hours of the new   Tlif Drfrro- Department today Mid Amrrirnn rasnallirs in Ihr Knrrnn War have rrnrhod n now total nf an ini-ri-ii.v nf I.- in n writ. With Grand Theft Three Yuma men have been charged with grand theft for al- legedly obtaining money under false pretenses. The charges were brought against George Williams, Lonnie Graham and Edward Lugo by G. C. Morse of Somcrton, represent- ing the Yuma Mesa Grapefruit Company. They are accused of drawing a check for by fraudulently representing 116.7 'tons of barn- yard fertilizer ordered by thc grapefruit growers. Williams and Graham were or dcred held under bond and Lugo was released on his own re- cr.gnizancc. BULLETIN! VOKK. May Western Union announced to- day it its supervisory t ruining program. touched off n walkout of j trlrgraph to avoid j frrrfTIT land and France, in order to con- strain them to vote for this em- bargo. I "This whole trend for the prc paration and eventual unleashing" Gets Suspended Terms For Getting Jobless Pay While Employed Justice of Peace Judge Ersel Byrd passed a 30 days suspended sentence on each of three counts against Readtis L. Brock, 137 2nd avenue. Yuma. for receiving Un- employment Compensation while he was employed. Brock had pre- viously made full restitution of the monies ptud him. testimony before the House Com- mittee. The contempt ruse against W r, i n h e r g virtually collapsed however, when Government Pro- seeutor Frank Cunningham went before Holt7.0ff todny and said :i federal immunity statute sus- tained Weinbern's id refuse to answer the grand jurors. WASHINGTON, May for automobiles and other civilian products will be cut about one-third belmv pre- Korean levels for July through September, the government an- nounced toilav. Four Feared Drowned As Heavy Rain Brings Floods In Oklahoma, Texas CLINTON. Okla.. Mny 17 Foiii' persons, including t o heroic school boys, were feared drowned today ns torrential rains pushod rivers out of their banks in the Midwestern wtates. Meanwhile, an Arapalio, Oklii.. school bus. missing since yester- diiy. was found at a farm house early today with of its occu- pants safe. Weathermen saw no letup in the J rains which drove scores of por- I .sons to higher ground in Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas as streams threatened farm houses and near- by towns. Near Pampa, Tex., where 12 Suggested Cut In Armed Forces Is Hit WASHINGTON. May 17 (U.R) President Truman said today that Sen. Robert A. Taft's "very fool- ish" suggestion to cut the armed forces' manpower goal by 300.000 men was "an invitation to war" with Russia. "Penny-pinching n o w m a y mean throwing away the lives of our soldiers later on." Mr. Tra- in the country will suffer." Mr. Truman did not mention Taft'K name, but the president left no doubt that he meant the Ohio Republican leader who is re- garded as a leading possibility for the 1952 GOP presidential nom- ination. "A suggestion was made by one senator the other dav that we [economic programs. I Speaking before the National j Conference on Citizenship, the house wives and wage earners to form n huge lobby to biing pres- sure on Congress for an exten- sion of strong controls over prices, and rents. "If they are not." Mr. Truman snid, "our whole economy will be lion mm." said Mr. Truman. "At a time like this, such a cut would i be very foolish. "Slashing the size of our armed I forces would not be economy, it would be an invitation to war." The projected goal for the armed forces during the next fis- cal year is 3.500.000 persons. Taft "a Inrge of personnel" which he believes be cor- rected. The president quarreled gen- erally with any idea of "penny- pinching." delay or reduction in the defense program, saying nation faced thc "very real danger of war" with Russia while "some people think j there is still time to piny politics." j Mr. Truman steered clear of I the controversy ovor conduct of cnn and his firing o! Sen. Douglas MacAithnr. Most nf the president's speech before tho Citizenship mcct-in? spon.sored by the. National Fxlu- ration Association and the De- partment of Justice dealt witr the domestic side of thc defense has suggested a drop in the goal effort. Here were some of 'jimilies were evacuated. Nationa guardsmen and sheriff's officers- stood by for possible rescue work the earthen dam on Lake Me Clellan threatened to hurst. Two Clinton boys were fcare' wept away in the flooded VVashiU river after their loaded school bu stalled at the edge of thc streair Rescue workers readul 10 otlnj children trapped in thc bus only 30 minutes before the vehicle was swept away in thc rushing water. The Oklahoma Highway Patrol said a student from Southwest em State College at Weather ford was missing along with an unidentified Indian boy from Clinton. The missing college student was alo Simpkons of Elk City. Okla. Guy Jackson, a student friend of Simpkons. was rescued early to- day after clinging to a telephone pole when hist seen. Armed Day To Be v Observed Sat. Company L, Yuma's- unit of the Arizona National Guard, will ob- serve Armed Forces Day Satur- day with open house at the arm- ory, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., feat- uring a weapons display, Capt. Elfren G. Coz, commanding of- ficer, announced today. The guardsmen will have an Armed Forces Day Dance a't the armory Saturday night, to .which the public is invited, the captain said. The public is also invited'to watch the guardsmen fire their at the rifle range Sun- day, Coz said, and civilians are welcome to try out their own marksmanship, us one 'target will be. for civilians only. Tom Clark, chairman of the Yuma American Legion Post's Armed Forces Day Committee, said there will be a simulated strafing attack by jet planes dur- ing the day and the Air Force has also promised that a B-36 will pass over Yuma Saturday. The Yuma post of the Veterans of Foreign Wars will 'nave a free Armed Forces Day dance, open to the public, at their hall on Prison Hill Saturday, night, starl- ing at -3 o'clock, Jim Burse an- nounced. Hearing Set for Three Women on Morals Charges Prices: Pressure has cnscd off little lately" but will conic tack "stronger than ever in the icxt few months." He said if >rices are not held down until a' Cfist the middle of next year, "the :o.st of living will go the have ti> have more ;f we ;iro to pay for our defense iro.sram und hold dqwn inflation." Cveryonc must pay his fair share. KonMjin Aid: "There is no in slashing our foreign ported bond each. Complaints ecatise unices against the three were signed by id program" be Plan Rites for Mrs. Maxine Bogle Friday, 4 P.M. Funeral services for Mrs. Max- ine Bogle. 31. of Yuma. who died Wednesday night at the Yuma General hospital, will be held in the chape! of the Johnson Mort- uary Friday'at 4 p.m.. it was an- nounced today at the mortuary. The Rev. S. M. White will the officiating clergyman. Interment The trio was arrested by Yimvi! in Desert Lawn Memorial fficers over the weekend and Park. She was bom October 12. 1919 in Wist. Okla.. and resided in Yu- limn for hearing was set for next Thursday afternoon in justice court for three Yuma women charged with keeping and residing in a house of fame. lilies are strong Kremlin i Sheriff .Tim Was'mmi. j mn for thc PRst 10 ywrs. Sur- night take- ;hem over and Irene Robot ts w.is charged with I viving arc the husband, 'Johnny langcr of war would ino.rc.ixc." keeping a disorderly house, a Uople. of IMS 1Kb. a son. Spending: "When we talk about: house of ill fame al 106 Gila street.! Johnny Jr..: n rtsugtiter, Barbara; Cutting non-do.fcnse expenditures, we must be .sure that we don't tut. the strength that supports' vir effort." The, other two. Tony Marino, were charged with residing in a house of ill fame, re- sorted to for the purpose of pros- 1 titution. W Vjllrt Stl vti.. 5 Walters and her parents. Mr. ar.d Mrs. L. Davenport of Aril.: brother. James U Davenport, Jr.. of Tucumcari. M., a t-r. Mrs. Winlaiid of   

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