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Sun Advertiser: Thursday, March 1, 1951 - Page 1

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   Sun-Advertiser (Newspaper) - March 1, 1951, Yuma, Arizona                             WtrtWr of Yi Highest last 24 hours............... K Lowest last 24 hours 39 Average high this date 76 Average low this date 48 Relative humidity at 11 a.m.. SUN-ADVERTISER SUCCESSOR TO THE YUMA WEEKLY SUN AND THE YUMA EXAMINER Forecast I'urrrast to Friday Mght Mostly cloudy with widely scat- tered showeis tonight and Friday. Somewhat wanner tonight. Local- ly windy tonight and Friday. VOLUME 47 Telephone 3-3331 YUMA, ARIZONA, THURSDAY. MARCH I. 1951 C opy NUMIEK 9 Expect Red China s BidaultWill Jry Form New French Govt. PARIS, March Uidault. former Premier and lead- er of the Popular Republican Par- ty agreed today to try to form u new coalition government to replace that of Rene Pleven. Pleven's middle-road coalition government resigned last night amid a domestic squabble over a new and complicated elec- High-Ranking Prisoner Rtvtals Red China Will Huri Troops In Korean Fush ON THE WEST-CENTRAL FRONT, Korea, March 1 (U.R) Red China will throw troops, including the long-missing 3rd Field Army, into its most powerful Korean offensive of the war this month, a high-ranking Chinese prisoner has told U.S. officers. The Chinese will support the attack for the first time with Russian-built jet fighters, heretofore seen only over northwest Korea far behind the fighting front, he said. The prisoner said the commu- nist objective will be to smash UN forces while they are in at- tack formations, break through their lines into southern Korea and force one or more "Dun- kerquc" evacuations. He said the rested and presum- ably re-equipped and reinforced 3rd Field Army will join the bat- tered -Hh Field Army already fighting south of the 38th Parallel in the offensive. The 3rd Field Army has been out of action since it forced the outnumbered U. S. 10th Corps to evacuate northeast Korea by sea last December. The army surrounded the U. S. 1st Marine Division and elements of the U. S. 7th Infantry Division .around the Chosin Reservoir and oral system. Each party wants look extremely heavy losses trying the system modified to give its h 18-Year-Old Drait Law Fades' March 1-- for quick Senate passage of the Administration's 18-yoar-oUl draft bill faded somewhat today. Amendments caused the trouble. Sen. Wayne Murso. It. Ore., had sevei al ready to offer. Action on the amendments will cause the delay. But Senate Democratic Leader Krnest MeKarlnnd. Ariz., .said he hopes for votes on some of the amendments by the end of the week. One amendment that Morse intends to offer would cither set the lower draft age limit ut or hold the term of service tu 21 months. The Administration bill provides for an 18-year-old draft and 26 months service. hi other congressional developments: LA13GK -Labor's walkout fioin representation in the gov- ernment's mobilization program stirred Sen. John Bricker. H. O. He said it wus a "terrible mistake" and would ask the House-Senate economic controls committee to look into it. TROOPS -Senate Republican Leader Kenneth S. Wherry wild must resolve a "deadly dollar grab" among the military services. The outcome, he said, will determine the pattern of the nation's defense establishment for years to come. Meanwhile the Senate foreign relations and armed services committees went into closed session to consider resolutions on the troops-for-ISuropc issue. House agriculture committee snid that farmers' needs for production materials nre being "disregarded." It called for "those in charge of the defense program" to revise farm policies. COMMUNISM The House "Un-American Activities commit- too will hold hearings next week which may lead Lo an investiga- tion of communism in Hollywood. own group the advantage. Bldault was asked to form a new government by President Vincent Auriol. He promised to start con- Hultations with party leaders im- mediately and report by tomorrow whether he was likely to succeed. Bidault was premier for s i x months in 19-16 and again from October, to June, 19BO. He was Foreign Minister in sev- eral post-war French govern- in vain to prevent them from es- caping to the coast. Chinese Nationalist intelligence reports more than a month ago Senate-House Deadlock in State Legislature Appears Dissolving PHORNIX. March 1 possible break appeared today threatened deadlock over the Arizona Senate's refusal to act on two controversial bills the House said that the 3rd Army had with-1 passed earlier in the leiguslative drawn to Manchuria to rest and regroup after the northeastern battle. The high ranking Chinese Com- inuniit prisoner, whose name and position cannot be disclosed, said the Chinese command has been waiting patiently to build up its ments. He was not Included in the supplies for the new offensive. Pleven cabinet, at his own re-i The recent Chinese-North Ko- qucsl. rean attack through the central Pleven declined to try to form mountains toward Wonju was not a new government because his a major offensive, but designed wife was taken seriously ill three only to discourage an Allied cross- days ago and now Is under con- Ing of the Han river into Seoul tinuous medical care. Pleven's resignation marked the. downfall of France's IBth govern- jjl ment since 1944. Court Upholds Retirement Act PHOENIX, March Arizona Supreme Court upheld the public employees retirement Bet- as it effects state an informal decision handed down late yesterday. '4 The court announced its ruling a memorandum opinion. It will is- a formal written opinion at a later date. .Action was rushed on the mea- sure so that the legislature might be given time to consider appro- priating funds to .put the act into operation. The state, awaiting court rul- and force the 8th Army to realign 'ts divisions, he said. ingi had not taken acton to pro- vide necessary funds for the act since it went into effect July 1, 1949. Since that time state em- ployees have contributed approxi- mately to the fund. The Supreme Court has empha- sized the ruling applies only to that portion of the public retirement act as. it effects state employees. The retirement act. provides for pensions at the age of 65 accord- ing to the salary and length of service of the applicant. Arizona Protestant Churches Oppose Draft PHOENIX, March (U.R) The Arizona Council of Churches announced today it formally op- josed universal military training and the drafting of 18-year-olds. In a resolution to bc sent to Arizona's congressional delega- tion, the church group charged universal military training would destroy the freedom from military service which has been a "cher- ished part" of our national her- itage, would introduce the danger of militarism, would invade the rights of the individual religious conscience and would add rathei than detract from the posslbillt} of war. The Council represents approx- imately members of the Protestant denominations in Ari- zona. 2 Ex-Pima County Officers Arrested In Vice Probe TUCSON, March 1 A Pima County grand jury continu- ed its probe into vice and crime in the southern county today alter returning indictements against two former officials yesterday. Arrested by sheriff's deputies were Bryce Wilson, former county attorney, and former Undersheriff Maurice T. Guiney. They w ere jailed on counts of conspiracy, re- ceiving bribes and receiving the earnings of a prostitute. Guiney was indicted by the 19- man jury on five counts and the ormer county attorney also faced ive counts. Both were held under bond. When Guiney was jailed he la- bled the charges "A frame." "I'll prove in court that I'm in nocent. that I have been framed and he said. Wilson's only comment was a .erse, "I'll probably file a coupk of complaints myself." Both men were held on S5.00C bond. Charges against Guiney in elude three he accepted money ii amounts of 5300 and from Alice Miller, who the charg cs claim had prostitutes workin] for her. The break came when the lower chamber announced it would de- bate two Senate-approved mea sures dealing with administration of the state's liquor laws. Appearance of the Senate bills the House committee of the vhole calendar came as a sur- prise and apparently ended the ower chamber's boycott of mea- ures from across the hall. First indication the House plan- ied to withhold action on all Sen- ite bills came two days ago when he lower chamber announced it vould consider its own measures only in committee of the whole sessions yesterday, today and next Tuesday. Reports indicated that the House loped in this manner to force the Senate to act on the disputed oil and gas conservation and land ease bills which an upper chain- jer committee recommended shelving for at least a year. The committee felt that fees provided in the leasing act would not bring the state a sufficient re- irn. With the' liquor bills scheduled !or debate today, there were re- ports the House may have giver up its attempt to force the Sen- ate to act on the oil and gas mea- sures. Both proposals were still in senate committees and the uppei chamber gave every indication o: keeping them there. The liquor bills measures the senate would like to sec forward- ed to Gov. Howard Pyle would freeze the issuance of new liquor licenses for a year and require a license applicant to wait a year before reapplying for a permit if it was previously rejected. The Senate yesterday recom- mended passage of a constitution- al amendment to limit the gover- nor's tenure to two terms. T w o other amendments were tentative ly approved by the House, on to limit the House membership ti 72 and the other to nbollah t h existing board of pardons a n c paroles. Sen. Harold Giss, Yuma coun .y, urged passage of the gover 's tenure limitation, argulnj that it would prevent any chic executive from "stacking" slat departments with political favoi tc's. He wu specifically referring to the new health, welfare am correction department. The proposed amendment, whlcl must be referred to a vote of th people, comes up for a final vot tomorrow before it goes to th House. In recommending a limit on th House membership, the lowe chamber failed to act on a pro vision which would have increa ed the Senate's site to 28 mem bers. As the proposal cleared th House committee, it leaves t h present ID-member Senate undi turbed. reesto e in Paris Lay Groundwork For Foreign Ministers' Meet MOSCOW, March 1 (U.R) llus- ila agreed today to a Western pro- 'HSU! for a meeting of British, American ami Soviet rep- In Paris Monday to ay the groundwork for a i'uur- lower foreign ministers' confer- Deputy Foreign Minister Andrei Jromyko formally accepted the nvltations of the three Western lowers In notes handed to tho niiv bassadors shortly after '1 p.m, (7 A. M. Gromyko met with the three ntcrvals. The French embassy said later t had received for 17 visas for Russians who wish to go to Paris. The list of names ncluded Foreign Ministry Coun- sellors Victor Lickhachcv, Michael rlvanov and Nikolai Kozhevnl- 
                            

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