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Tucson Daily Citizen Newspaper Archive: March 23, 1967 - Page 2

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   Tucson Daily Citizen (Newspaper) - March 23, 1967, Tucson, Arizona                              PAGE 2 TUCSON DAILY CITIZEN NEW NAMES ON LIST? NASA Disbands All 3-Man Astronaut Teams SPACE CENTER, Houston for a fresh tstart in the .wake of the Apollo 1 fire, the U.S. Space Agency has disbanded all three-man teams of astronauts assigned as Apollo crews. v Tht action raises a possibility that names might appear on the next crew lists. No such re-assignment expected until of at crews s least next month, after the Space Agency decides what spacecraft and program changes are needed as a result of the Jan. 27 tragedy. Austfonaut chief Donald K. (Deke) told UPI in an RIPS CURRENT SETUP Donaldson Calls For Countywide District Arizona's system, of financing public schools was called inade- quate, inequitable and intoler- able today by Dr. Marion Don- aldson, superintendent of the Arnphitheater.School District. Donaldson, one of four panel- ists', at-a Chamber of Commerce he had made this observation as a "young soph- omorjc teacher" in 1936 and "I still have the same opinion to- day." Other speakers at the Aztec breakfast were Dr. Robert 'Paulsen, dean of the University jof Arizona College of Educa- ;tion; Hugh Summers, business manager of. Tucson District 1, and Donald Hansen, a member of the Tucson District 1 Com- imittee of 100, which has made a i study of public education. t i Donaldson said that even IV i rrice 1 ix [Reported f, WASHINGTON (UPI) The '.Justice Department announced, ;tpday it has launched an antitrust investigation into the operations of an international cartel; which allegedly schemed to inflate prices of a vital heart The move was disclosed by Atty. Gen. Donald F. head of the depart- Antitrust Division. turner told the Senate on Antitrust and that he acted on the of documents uncovered Senate investigators., .'rv The subcommittee said the are minutes of of -multi-nation which manipulated the world supply and manufacture quinine and quinidine. "On fte basis of these .i documents we have begun an ihvesti.gation to determine whe- ther the American antitrust 'laws have been VTurner said. Firms involved in the cartel tare in England, West Germany, 'Prance and The Netherlands, ;-the subcommittee reported. ;1 One of the Dutch firms listed a cartel member had been a perpetual U.S. federal vcourt injunction since 1928 to fstop any price-fixing, involving "-quinine. Subcommittee staff members -testified Wednesday that the pages of the cartel's diary tell the day-to-day story of conspira- ''ey which cornered the market '.on the drugs. Quinidine, a derivative of qui- nine, is used by heart patients. hough .the state "pays mil- ion to support education, "the system still is not right. The wealth of the state should edu- cate all "children despite where ihey may attend school." A proponent of a single countywide school district, Don- aldson s'aid it is highly inequi- table for people in the Continen- tal School District to pay 72 cents per in valuation and property owners in his district to pay ?8.70 per He also cited the rate in Vail, in Ajo, in Sa- huarita, ?8.15 in District 1 and .65 in Flowing Wells as exam- ples'of this inequity. Donaldson pointed bonded indebtedness to pay for school facilities ranges from zero to 100 per cent. The educator chided the State, Legislature for not providing more funds for education this year. Summers predicted the school property tax rate would contin- ue to go up "unless Something is done soon." He noted that 60 per cent of the physical proper- ties in his district have been built in the last 14 years and the s'chool student population has doubled in the past 12 years. He reported 84 per cent of the teachers are not drawing their maximum salaries. Hansen, also a proponent of a county district, said the rate in District 1 would drop from to if there were only one district in Pima County. Paulsen told the audience it was its duty to find the funds for education. Edgar Butterbaugh, an ac- countant and member of the Amphitheater School Board, moderated the forum. Zunno Picked As Instructor Lt. Frank Zunno, head of the city police intelligence unit, has been selected to represent the International Association of Ciiefs of Police as a police in- structor, Police Chief Bernard L. Garmire said today. Garmire said Quinn Tamm, executive director of the IACP, requested Zunno's services from April 15 through June 30 to spend two weeks at the Metro- politan Police Department in Washington, D.C., and the bal- ance of time with the Baltimore City Police. Both department1; are under- going drastic organizational changes as recommended in re- c e n t surveys, according to Tamm. Zunno will work closely with a former Tucson Police Chief Paul Bohardt, now on the staff with the TACP. Auto Sales Still Down DETROIT (AP) Auto sales the second 10 days of March, Tthe auto makers reported yes- ;Pilot Loses ;Costly Dome jOver Alps BERN (UPI) When the observatory atop -'foot Jungfraujoch Mountain Cwanted to install a new cupola, offered to help with a '.giant transport helicopter and of its top pilots. The pilot, Jean Boulet, took ton dome to ;the summit but couldn't get it j'nto position because of bad On the way back to Karon in ;the Valais Alps, Boulet dropped ,'the cupola. He explained that the jettison "mechanism malfunctioned. "The cupola went down in wide, swinging like a he" said .somewhat admiringly. disappeared iri the moun- north of Brigue." helicopters still were for H today. terday, continued to slump well behind the pace set in 1966. General Motors sales were down 20 per cent, or about 000 vehicles, from the March 11- 20 period of 1966. Ford was down 39 per cent, or about vehicles, and Chrysler sales were down 11 per cent, or almost vehicles. American Motors had sales of down 16 per cent from the same period of 1966. For the industry as a whole, sales so far this year have been down 21 per cent from the chalked up between Jan. 1 and March 20 of 1966. GM showed the biggest de- cline in both percentage and number of cars for the year, down 22 per cent, or ve- licles fewer than the world's biggest auto maker sold up to the same point last year. Ford sales for the year were down 21 per cent vehicles) from last year's total by March 20, and Chrysler sales were down 16 per cent or below the sold by March 20 of 1966. Zxctft Sunday ky Ctllrcn PubHihta! Co. Ht North Stone SUBSCRIPTION MATES: Home-Delivered In 45e ptr wsek or S23.4D ptr yttr Tucion, 45c Mr week or il.95 month. Mill Rules: In Atfvunce, 17.25 month or yesr. Second rntM Tucson, exclusive interview the crew designations were officially dropped shortly after the lire that killed Virgil Grissom, Ed White and Roger Chaffee. "We don't have any crews assigned officially .to any missions at the present Slayton said. "There's hot much point in worrying about assignments until we know what we're going to Slayton said no idea what the composition of the new crews would be or when they would be announced. Immediately after the fire the space agency suspended schedules calling for two, and possibly three, manned Apollo flights this year. Crews were assigned to all these but no mention was made at the time they were suspended of dropping the crew assignments. Backing up the Apollo 1 prime crew Grissom, White and a team consisting of veteran Walter Schirra and rookies Donn Eisele and Walter Cunningham. Many observers felt this team would step in .to fly the first Apollo mission. The Apollo 2 crew, scheduled to make the first manned test in space of the bug-shaped lunar landing craft, consisted of James McDivitt, David Scott and Russell' Schweickart. Of this team, only Schweickart had never been into space. Apollo 3 crewmen were veterans Frank Bovman and Mike Collins, and rookie Bill Anders who would be making his first spaceflight. They, were to fly the first manned test in earth orbit of the powerful Saturn 5 moon rocket. Slayton said he thought the Apollo 2 and Apollo 3 crews, along with their backup teams, would "probably" remain the same when new assignments are made. he said, "I couldn't guarantee you anything. I guess all I can say in the crew area is that this is all unresolved at the present time." THURSDAY, MARCH 23, 1967 Peaceful Invaders Pretty Mercedes Abell, a student from Ohio State University, cools herself in the warm Atlantic Ocean at Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Miss Abell is one of the thousands of college students to invade the Florida coast over the Easter holi- days. The boys running through the surf, possibly for a closer look, are Jim Sullivan (left) of Malibu Beach, Calif, and John Keate, a Cornell student. (AP Wirephoto) Fathers Must Pay Support Or Be Jailed PHOENIX A new law providing jail terms for fathers who do not pay court-ordered child support will go into effect June 12. Gov. Jack Williams signed the bill Wednesday. The, meas- ure provides that anyone con- victed of failure to pay child support be jailed for not less than five days or more than three months. A second violation within two years would result in a jail term of 15 days to six months. The judge cannot grant proba- SALE! Delight the Whole Family Take Home a Pet from Sears Pet Shop SAVE Hamsters Reg. 98' These cute little make a wonderful pet. Their playful antics will delight you and vour child- ren for hours. Hamster Food 39 SAVE 24'! Healthy, hardy.slock. So cn- lerlaining and amusing. Re- quire little care. Buy yours now while you can save! S. SAVE Economical, Coxy Mouse Cages Rrg.Sl.29 88 ea. CHARGE It on Sears Revolving Charge comfortable home for your mouse. AH wire cage is sturdy, easy to keep c'lean. YOL'KK ONLY MINUTES A WAY FROM SKAKS SAVINGS! ,9SO r _ AND CO. tion, but may let the father ment hours, and spend the rest work during his regular employ- of the time in jail. APPARENT SUICIDE Artist Van Ryder Found Shot To Death The well-known western artist Jack Van Ryder was found shot to death today at his ranch home near Amado. Ex Officio Coroner Gilbert C, Soto said the shooting apparent- ly happened about 10 or 11 p.m. yesterday. He said it apparently was suicide. Born in nearby Continental in 1899, he spent most of his life in southern Arizona as a cowboy and rancher. It was Charles Russell, fhe famed artist of rug- ged outdoor scenes, who started him on his way to success. Van Ryder won acclaim for his murals of the West for the American Museum of Natural History and one of his paintings won the Corcoran Prize. In 1936 he had a one-man show of 33 oil paintings in New York Gains- borough Galleries.. Van Ryder interrupted his ca- reer for military service with the American Expeditionary Force to France during World War.I. Upon his return he set- tled near the Huachuca -Moun- tains. Near the onset of World War II he went with the 2nd Amer- ican Volunteer Group to serve with Gen, Claire Chenault in China for four years. He eventually retired as a lieutenant-colonel. He was act- ive since 1940 with the Civil Air Patrol. Among other activities, he was a free-lance columnist lor several Arizona newspapers. In later years he preferred to work in oils rather than with pen, pencil and charcoal, which he employed so well in his ear- lier years. He provided the orig- inal illustrations for the Jack Weadock book, "Dust of the De- sert." He had showings in re- cent years at Tubac. ,Residents of the area said Van Ryder hurt some ribs a few months ago. His home was ap- proximately a mile southeast of Amado. Friends said he re- ceived a visit during the holiday season from his wife who lives in New Jersey. Medicare Does Not Pay All Costs .vMany persons enrolled h. Medicare are under the wrong impression that the 'program provides full coverage of medi- cal expenses, Douglas Carter said today. Carter, district manager ol the Social Security Adminis- tration, explained .that benefi- ciaries are responsible for the first of a medical bill and for 20 per cent of the remain- der. Social Security, he said, pays 80 per cent of.the bill after a deductioi. of the The district manager also ex- plained that in order to get Medicare coverage at the start of their 65th birthday persons must enroll within a three- month period prior to the birth- day. When enrollment is delayed until the month >t the 65th birthday, coverage does not be- gin until the following month. A two to three-month delay in cov- erage results if the enrollment is later, Carter addeds IF YOU LET RALPH'S MOVING STORAGE vy do it for You... _, WUlf LMSS 127 W. 5th St. Strv'mg Tucson 41 Years Phone 622-6461 Sears Save 3 Days Only smoother ,nd lirar Choice Smooth Dripless Latex Flat Paint No Dripping, No Splatter, No Mess on smoothly, makes painting almost effortless. Takes only 30 minutes to dry. Beautiful finish is wash- able and stain resistant." Soapy water cleans paint tools. Sixteen attractive colors to choose from. 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