Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Arizona Republic Newspaper Archive: January 02, 1965 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Arizona Republic

Location: Phoenix, Arizona

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for Liking us on Facebook

  • We are retrieving your image from the archive...

  • We are converting your image into tiles...

  • Almost done...

   Arizona Republic (Newspaper) - January 2, 1965, Phoenix, Arizona                                The Bowls Rose Mich. 34, Ore. St. 7 Cotton Aik. 10, Nebr. 7 Sugar LSU13, Syrac. 10 CITY MAM Orange Texas 21, 'Bama 17 bU 14-90 G (Details Page 33 \ Pictures Page 35 f Phoenix Weather Mostly fair; cooler with frost this morning. Predicted liigli SC. Yesterday's temperatures: high 54, low 41. Humidity: high M, low 48. DetaUs, Page 7. The Arizona Republic Today's Chuckle A real test of will power is to have the same ailment some person is describing to you-and not mention it. 75th Year, No. 230      telephone: 271-8000 Phoenix, Arizona, Saturday, January 2, 1965 d     Ten Cents STEEL PRICES STUDIED Car Crashes Take 2 Lives A PHOENIX bank official and a Patagonia man became Arizona's first 1965 traffic fatalities in separate accidents yesterday. Dead are James David Fitzgerald, 29, of 822 N. First St., and Mike Valenzuela Rivera, 20, of Patagonia. Phoenix police said Fitzgerald was pronounced dead at Good Samaritan Hospital after the car he was driving was involved in a three-car collision in the 4600 block of E. Camelback shortly before 3 a.m. The Arizona Highway Patrol reported Rivera was killed about 6 a.m. yesterday when his northbound car left Arizona 82, 2 miles south of Patagonia.  Investigators said 1 Day In 1965 2 Traffic Deaths Rivera, alone in the car, was traveling at a high rate of speed when the car broadsided and overturned. the deaths put Arizona's 1965 traffic fatality toll at 2, the same figure as on this date a year ago. Five other persons were injured in the Phoenix crash. One of them, a passenger in Fitzgerald's car, was listed as critical. Fitzgerald's mother and sister were killed last June 9 in a car-train accident in Flagstaff. Police said William Robert Dupuy. 22, of 3433 N. 47th Place, an employe of Mountain Shadows resort, was driving west on Camelback at a high rate of speed when he lost control of his vehicle on a curve. THEY SAID Dupuy's car struck the rear of another westbound car occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Peter Schneider of 1621 W. Colter. The Schneider car overturned and skidded several feet, trapping the couple for several minutes. The Schneiders suffered minor injuries and were treated and released from Good Samaritan. Dupuy was admitted in good condition. After colliding with the Schneider car, police said, Duty's vehicle crossed the center ine of Camelback and collided head-on with Fitzgerald's east-bound vehicle. TWO PASSENGERS in Fitzgerald's car, Robert Joseph Smith. 29, of Los Gatos, Calif., and Amy Chaffin, 20, of 3501 N. 63rd St., were injured. Both (Continued on Page 4, Col. 1) India Says Tension High in Red China NEW DELHI (UPI)-The Indian government said yesterday that "tension is mounting" in Communist China because of the U.S. decision to station the nuclear submarine Daniel Boone in the Pacific. A government statement said Peking has imposed a curfew along its entire coastal area. In Taipei, Formosa, Nationalist Chinese military spokesman Rear Adrn. Pei Yu-fen confirmed reports that Communist China has massed a large number of troops in the southwest part of the mainland. He said the troops were moved into provinces bordering Vietnam after the Gulf of Tonkin incident last August. The United States bombed North Vietnamese bases on the gulf following a North Vietnamese torpedo boat attack on U.S. ships. Pei said the Peking regime may throw troops into the Vietnamese war at any time. Until now, Chinese aid in the guerrilla war has been limited to training and supply. 1,000 Men Sent Into Viet Fight SAIGON, Vietnam (AP) A fleet of U.S. helicopters ferried two fresh Vietnamese battalions to Binh Gia yesterday to beef up battered government forces in the five-day fight with a surprisingly tenacious Viet-cong regiment. The battalions totaled about 1,000 men. The first large-scale showdown of the war was developing around Binh Gia, a Roman Catholic refugee village on a rubber plantation area 40 miles east of Saigon. Witnesses said a U.S. Army captain advising a Vietnamese marine battalion and the battalion commander were killed Thursday in the ambush of a marine contingent trying to check the identity of the dead in four fresh graves believed to contain the bodies of four U.S. helicopter crewmen. Conffarmatfon of flie death of the captain would bring the toll of American casualties in the fight to five killed, two captured by the Vietcong and at least 11 wounded. In Saigon's outskirts, Vietcong snipers shot at some U.S. servicemen water-skiing on the Saigon River New Year's Day. None of the GIs was hit, but a U.S. Navy commander in charge of the recreation facility was slightly injured when a youth threw a grenade at him as the Navy officer drove to the scene on his motorcycle to investigate. The snipers apparently were concealed in the river bank near a water sports club maintained in a Saigon suburb mainly for U.S. servicemen. None was caught. Aircraft searched throughout the day for two Americans aboard a spotter plane that vanished in mountain terrain of central Vietnam near the Laotian border while on a reconnaissance mission from Da Nang. THE TWO airmen were identified in Washington as Capt. Kurt C. McDonald, the pilot, son of Mr. and Mrs. Craig W. McDonald, San Bruno, Calif.; and Sgt. Edward R. Dodge, son of (Continued on Page 4, Col. 5) 1964} Worst Year on State Roads By ROBERT I. MELBO THE YEAR 1964 was the bloodiest in history on Arizona highways. The count stands at 584, 67 more than the previous high of 517 set in 1959, and 71 more than were killed in 1963. And before statisticians can close their books on 1964, the toll is expected to go even higher as delayed death reports trickle in. BUT WHILE the statewide toll was up. Phoenix and Maricopa County reported fewer deaths in 1964 inside their boundaries than the preceding year. Phoenix counted 71, down 9, and the county reported 192, down '51. However, Phoenix police finished out 1964 with one of the busiest traffic accident nights in history. Thursday night officers investigated 180 traffic accidents, 32 of which involved injuries. One was a fatality. "It's bad," E. R. Menhennet, executive director of the Arizona Traffic Safety Foundation, said vesterday of 1964's grim fatality record. "But it (the toll) is up all over the nation." MENHENNET said 43,000 persons were killed in the United States in traffic accidents in 1963. "But it could go even to 45,-000 for 1964," he added. "No one knows what's causing it. There's a lot of theories." He explained that one factor contributing to the Arizona total is the increase in cars and motorists on Arizona highways. "In 1963, on a national average, 5.5 persons were killed per each 100 million miles driven. That year Arizona's fatality rate dropped for the first time below 7, to approximately 6.6," he said. MENHENNET explained that he doesn't feel Arizona's 1964 death rate will increase, even with the highest state death count on record, because of the hundreds of million more miles driven by motorists in the state. "This is the only improvement that Arizona shows," he said. "The rate has been dropping every year." Nearly 40 per cent of those killed on Arizona's highways are out of state residents. The fact that Arizona is a "corridor state" is another factor in the record toll, Menhennet commented. TWO MONTHS in 1964 set death records of their own Ninety persons died in July and 70 in August. The 1964 count surpassed the 1963 toll on Nov. 16 and topped the 1959 record the next day, "The high death toll on the highways is going to continue until every individual accepts his own responsibility," Menhennet said. "Respect for the law, respect for the rights of others, and an ability to share the road with other drivers is what's needed." LONESOME NO MORE-Yesterday was a doubly happy one for Phoenix Zoo's Leo the Lion as he and his 18-month-oId bride, Reina, were placed together for the first time and in the zoo's new lion �public Phst* tn Nylt LMthim home. The moat-type enclosure permits zoo visitors to view the proud beasts as if in natural surroundings. Cost of their new home was $20,000. (Story on the zoo, Page 21.) Fair Skies In Prospect Over State THE RAIN and snow which made driving hazardous for many a reveler early on New Year's Day apparently have abated. The first of the year arrived with snow falling at Flagstaff and at other points in the northern and eastern mountains. GENTLE rain continued to fall in the Valley until mid-morning yesterday, when skies began to clear. This clearing trend was expected to continue over much of the state today, the weatherman said. State Labor Chief Protests Hayden Bracero Proposal The Arizona Highway Patrol^'''^"'"^^^y- JOHN EVANS, secretary of the state AFLrCIO, yesterday sent a telegram to Labor Secretary W. Willard Wirtz protesting a proposal that Mexican na-tionals be imported to fill Arizona farm labor jobs under immigration provisions. The proposal was made Thursday by Sen. Carl Hayden, D-Ariz., who urged Wirtz to provide means for Arizona produce growers to use Mexican labor to prevent crop losses. THE EXCHANGE came as about 2,000 braceros in Arizona, including nearly 300 in the Salt River Valley, began returning to Mexico. A bracero law that permitted the importation of Mexican laborers into the United States for the past 13 years expired at midnight Sen. Hayden, in his letter to Wirtz, said that vegetable grow- ers in Arizona whose crops are now on the ground will suffer losses that will affect the state'sjjn 1921. reported yesterday that there were no roads closed in the state and no chains were required. It cautioned, however, that roads within a 30-mile ra-j whole economy, dius of Flagstaff and in the! THE SENATOR asked the Payson-Heber area were slick. 1 labor   secretary  to  establish OVER THE state, the weather! is expected to be generally fair today and tonight. It will be locally warmer in the northern part of the state today. standards allowing Mexican farm workers now in Arizona to remain under a long-standing immigration act permitting temporary employment of foreign agricultural workers. Evans, in a tersely worded telegram, told Wirtz: "I have no desire to see growers ruined but, despite their pressure, the. fact is that the last extension of the bracero program was granted for them to get ready for the present situation. "UNORGANIZED and disadvantaged farm laborers and po- Union Jack Flutter.s Aj2;ain in Ireland DUBLIN (AP) - Fluttering frorri the tower of Irish television's 360-foot transmitter in Dublin yesterday morning was a Union Jack, a symbol of British rule which ended in Ireland tential workers among unemployed have no voice or recourse if you permit unfair foreign competition without adequate effort to recruit American workers. "Until an intensive recruitment program is undertaken to offer presently unemployed Arizona and U.S. citizens ... the same fair competitive job opportunities ... as the highly preferential treatment a 11 0 t e d our friends from outside the country, such importation is a mockery of the free enterprise system and certainly of any call to arms in a war on American poverty." LB J Asks 'Look Into' Increases By CHARLES MOHR New York Times Service AUSTIN. T6X.-President Johnson has asked Gordon Ackley, the chairman of his Council of Economic Advisers, to "look into" recent selective increases in steel prices. White House Press Secretary George E. Reedy announced yesterday. All major steel companies have increased the price of galvanized sheet and coils steels by $6 a ton. Galvanized sheet accounts for 5 per cent of all steel shipments by dollar volume. Asked if Ackley was expected to make recommendations for some course of presidential action. Reedy said Ackley was expected to report whatever "he deemed to be necessary." Some dbserven believe the steel companies are testing the Pesideat with the selective increases and that, if they do not meet strong White House opposition, they might gradually move to increase prices of all products. The problem is compounded by the fact that the companies and the United Steel Workers Union will negotiate a nev/ work contract this year. Wage increases agreed to then could push prices up further and contribute to inflationary pressures which Johnson is anxious to prevent. In April 1962 the steel companies announced a price increase which drew the ire of President Kennedy who exerted all of the influence of his office and obtained a repeal of the increase within 72 hours. Kennedy was praised for his forcefulness by some, but criticized by others for exerting undue pressure. Johnson is acutely aware of the fact that a President can be blamed for either intervening EVANS SAID in other com-j in such a situation or refusing ments that he doesn't believe Sen. Hayden is urging use of the Immigration laws exclusively to import bracero workers. Evans said he believes the senator's to intervene. At the same time, Johnson announced his intention to shift two U.S. ambassadors to new stand on the matter was mis-iP�^'^- interpreted. j Maurice M. Bernbaum. the "I hope his  position  would:ambassador to Ecuador, will be rather be to provide Americaniassigned to Venezuela. Wym-ueaucinn 11 was me worK ot a i workers with  adequate  labor!berley DeR Coerr, who is now NeTSVpS^r officials'standards so they can partici-:serving as ambassador to Uru-h=,H thp f\^0 rpmnvPri I pate in the American economv,": guay. will replace Bernbaum m Ecuador. Stories Inside A Prayer FATHER of all beginnings, as this New Year opens its portals before us, may we determine to walk through the doors with faith in Thy providence and confidence in Thy plans for us. Grant that in days of peace and calm we may prepare our minds and hearts for the emergencies and sorrows to come. Amen. Highs in the state today are expected to be 40 to 50 in the higher elevations and 50 to 60; elsewhere. Expected lows were 10 to 25 in the higher elevations  and 25 to 40 elsewhere. The high in Phoenix yesterday was 54 with a low of 41. Rain yesterday morning measured .09 inches. The forecast for Phoenix was; cooler with frost this morning, i The predicted high is 56. THE NEW Year's Eve snow-^ fall measured 4 inches at Flagstaff, 3 at Grand Canyon and 1 at Wirslow. Flagstaff has had a total of! 10 inches of snow this week. The Arizona Snow Bowl had another foot and a half of snow at the lodge and upwards of two feet on higher ski trails making ski conditions excellent. International JOHNSON administration hopes U.N. Secuity Council call for nonintervention in Africa has opened the door to a solution of the Congo crisis. Page 2. National Philadelphia's capering, bespangled Mummers give a rousing welcome to the New Year in a dazzling parade, as they have since the turn of the century. Page 23. Arizona Sarah Folsom, to take over the state superintendent of public instruction office Monday, says she will keep most of the present employes on the staff. Page 20. GENERAL INDEX pate iEvans commented. I "Millions of dollars of Ameri- C. Alan Stewart, the present ;can money have gone to Mexi- ambassador to Venezuela, has CO." Evans added. "I think;been reassigned to the State De-Arizona businessmen will agreeipartment in Washington. No we could use this state." those dollars in new ambassador has been named. to Uruguay 	Page	Page		Page Astrology	24	Edit, Opinion   7	Sports	33-39 Bridge	22	Fifer           21	Theaters	58 Churches Comics	25-27 62	Financial   53-56	TV-Radio Want Ads	59-CO 42-51 Crossword	41	Obituaries     41	Weather	7 Editorials	8	Pictures       57	Women	28-31 See 1964 Financial Roundup, Beginniug Page 53 Citfs 1st 1965 Baby is Girl A GIRL bom one hour into 1965 at Good Samaritan Hospital was the first .\ew Year's baby in Phoenix. However, the girl is the daughter of a Tempe couple, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cordova, First baby born in the Valley came only one minute after 1964 ended. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jesus La-paglia of Chandler, born at Community Hospital in Chandler. Eleven minutes later, the first boy of the New Year was born in Mesa Lutheran Hospital. He is the son of Mr, and Mrs. Edward Jlickcox of Tempe. The first baby in Scottsdale was a boy. born at 1:50 a.m. to Mr. and Mis. Robert Wallauer. 474 W. Second St., Scottsdale. Glendale's first 1965 arrival was Danna Marjean Blachly, born at 9:47 a.m. to .Mr. and Mrs. Howard Blachly, 6328 W. Orange Drive. First cWld born in Tempe this year arrived at Tempe Community Hospital at 5:30 a.m. It was a boy for Mr. and Mrs. Roy Williams, 2116 E. Mc^le Lane, Phoenii. i   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication