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Miami Daily Arizona Silver Belt Newspaper Archive: August 2, 1915 - Page 1

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Publication: Miami Daily Arizona Silver Belt

Location: Miami, Arizona

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   Miami Daily Arizona Silver Belt (Newspaper) - August 2, 1915, Miami, Arizona                                 THE  VOL. Yin. KO. 253.  11 KILLED IK  MIAMI, ARIZONA, MONDAY, AUGUST 2, 1915.  PRICE FIVE CENTS.  ETHEL THOMAS AND EARL KERR DIE EARLY SUNDAY MORNING FROM INJURIES RECEIVED IN FOOTHILLS OF FINALS—AUTOMOBILE PARTY ON WAY To ATTEND DANCE AT SCHOOL HOUSE AT TIIE TIME THE AFFAIR OCCURRED.  SAD AFFAIR CASTS AN ATMOSPHERE OF GLOOM OVER THE EN-TIRE COMMUNITY AT THE COUNTY SEAT—( Alt WHICH WAS OVERTURNED AT THE FOOTHILLS CATCHES ON FIRE AND AWFUL DISASTER RESULTS.  Miss Ethel Thomas and Earl Kerr died yesterday at the county hospital at Globe as the result of injuries received in an automobile accident in the foothills of the Final mountains Saturday nlglvt. 'Miss Thomas died while being taken to the hospital at 3 o’clock Sunday morning without regaining consciousness. Kerr's death occurred shortly after 8 o’clock Sunday morning. He was conscious up until a few minutes before his death. The sad accident threw an atmosphere of gloom over the entire community Sunday.  Miss Thomas and Kerr were members of a party which was going to  to relieving the sufferings of the victims of the tragedy until the arrival of Dr. Wales, who was readied by telephone at the ranger station. Miss Thomas was taken to the ranger station and her wounds dressed. An attempt was made later to remote her to the hospital, but death occurred before reaching there. Kerr was immediately taken to the hospital and every effort made to save him, but his injuries proved to be more serious than they were at first thought to be, and after several hours of fearful agony his death resulted.  Miss Thomas, who was about twen-  the Pinal school house to attend a ty years of age, was employed at  dance there, the others being Mia* Anna Fabina, Miss Elsie Cuff, W. J. Jordan and C. D. McDonald.  Jack Mills was driver of the car which they hired for the occasion. While driving up a steep grade near their destination the engine “died” and the car began to roll back down the hill. The emergency brake was applied, but failed to hold the car. In order to stop the machine Mills then turned it towards the bank, but as it neared the bank the rear wheel struck a large boulder and the car turned over from the shock.  All of the members of the party escaped safely from the machine except Kerr and Miss Thomas, who were pinned underneath. From some cause not yet determined the gasoline took tire and the two helpless occupants were enveloped in the flames. The other members of the party then attempted to release their companions and finally succeeded in overturning the car and roiling it down the hill.  It is stated that at the time of the overturning of the machine the girl was crying that her head hurt and her companions tugged away at the machine. Suddenly a slight explosion occurred and the automobile caught fire. Despite the danger of receiving burns and bruises those who had escaped when the machine turned over kept bravely on with their work. Hut gasoline had dripped from the tank of ( tlie automobile on to the clothing of the victims and their injuries and burns were beyoud description.  They then turned their attention  Neary’s confectionery store. Kerr was an employe of the Arizona Eastern railway at Globe and was twen‘v-  ANOTHER TO COME B. B. GAME  RAMSEY'S LACK OF CONTROL COST THE CONCENTRATOR CITY ROYS THE VICTORY SUNDAY AFTERNOON.  AT LEAST THIS IS PRESENT PROGRAM, GLOBE AND MIAMI  locals having combined to  SECURE RESULTS.  AFTER DISASTROUS FIRST IN-[CELEBRATION TO llE XING, MIAMI FOUGHT GAMELY TO PULL GAME OUT BUT WITH-OCT SUCCESSFUL RESULTS.  HELD AT MIAMI AND PLANS ARE LAID TO MAKE IT BIGGEST EVER HELD IX DISTRICT.  LT.  ft  L  By the Associated Press.  NEW YORK, Aug. 2.—So great a crowd was at the funeral of Lieutenant Becker that the police reserves were called. One carr’age was filled with floral tributes, the largest of which bore the device, “Sacrificed to Politics,” Previously the silv r banner bearing the allegation that Becker had been murdered by Gov. Whitman was removed.  STILL HOLD  Ramsey’s lack of control cost Miami the game at Globe yesterday. The result of the game was decided in the first inning when Globe scored six runs as the result of seven passes and a hit.  After Ramsey had walked six men with three scores resulting and only one out, lie was relieved by Johnson, who tried gamely to hold the Globe players. But Johnson had not warmed up sufficiently and a pass and a timely single resulted in three more runs. Afu.r the first inning  eight years of age. Both the young  lu,t ftve llits wert * made off Johnson, people were very popular among the Globe scored once more in the  members of Globe’s younger social circles. It is reported that they were engaged to be married soon.  Kerr’s father returned from a visit to California Sunday night and did not learn«of the tragedy until ills arrival at Globe. Mrs. Kerr is on a visit to Kansas ICty, where the body will be taken for burial. The young man’s sister was at his bedside during his last hours and his agony was forgotten in attempts to console iter, telling her that he did not think his injuries were serious and that lie would surely recover. He was conscious until near the end.  The body of Miss Thomas will be taken to San Francisco for burial.  C ARRANZA GETS MEXICO C ITY  By the Associated Press.  WASHINGTON, D. C., Aug. 2.— Consul Silliman of Vera Cruz today confirmed the news of the reoccupa-tion of Mexico City by the Gonzales-Cmrranza army. The Red Cross representatives, in a massage, stated that people were dying from starvation at the capital and tiiat conditions were frightful. They are hunger stricken and are eating dt«d horses and mules.  The Red Cross message said there was no corn in the city. “Some of the people are eating leaves, grass, weeds and dead horses and mules,” the report continued.  eighth on a pass, h't and error.  After the disastrous first inning Miami fought gamely to pull the game out. But the breaks of tin-game were against them as the best they could get from eleven clean hits, whicli included four two-baggers, was four runs.  TIIE BOX HCORE     GLOBE—    AB. R.    H. O.    A.    E.      Miller, 2b        1    2    3    2    1      Whitt. If    3    0    0    1    1    0      Thompson, lb    . .3    1    0    6    1    1      Coy, rf ......    3    1    0    1    0    0      Barton, 3b    . .3    <>    2    3    1    0      Shute, cf    •»    1    0    2    0    9      Bigando, ss . .    . .3    1    2    1    3    0      Watson, c    . .2    0    0    7    4    1      Hatch, p    . .3    0    0    2    1    1      •Steiner, cf ..    . .1    0    0    1    0    0      Totals    .26    7    6    27    13    4      •Steiner relieved    Shute    n 8th.          MIAMI—    AB.    R.    H.    O.    A.    E.      Barker, cf        0    0    2    0    0      Ward, 2b        0    1    3    2    1      Felts, If .....    4    0    0    1    0    0      Guynup, lb .    . .4    2    3    4    0    0      Ramos, rf        1    1    1    0    0      Mioore, 3b , .    4    0    2    2    1    0      Taylor, c ...        0    2    9    3    0      Boland, ss . .        0    0    0    1    1      Ramsey, p    0    0    0    0    0    0      •Johnson, p .    . .4    1    2    2    1    0      ••Baroldy ..    . .1    0    0    0    0    0      Totals. , .    . 35    4    11    24    8    2     The members of the Globe Labor Council at a meeting held at the county seat late last week decided to unite with the labor unions of Miami in the work of making the proposed Miami Labor Day celebration the greatest ever seen in the history of the district. A committee of five represenCng the union men of Globe was appointed to cooperate witli Miami. it is understood that the representation on the celebration committees is to be equally divided between the Miami and the Globe locals.  Governor Hunt has been invited to come as the orator of the day and it is thought that he will accept the invitation. W. B. Cleary, of Blsbe-, •was also invited to deliver an address, but on account of a prior engagement it will not be possible for him to participate. However, it is thought that S nator Worsley will be able to come in the place of W. B. Cleary.  The Labor Day committee lias been organized as follows: General committee: J. Tom Lewis, chairman; H. S. McCluskey, secretary: Carpenters, Matt Jacobson; Electrical Workers, Nelson; Cooks and Walters, Banks; Boiler Makers, Reagan; Clerks, Rose; Painters, Hobs; Barbers, Williams.  A BIG REDUCTION IN THE INTERSTATE EXPRESS RATES  New interstate express rates which will result in a reduction of about thirty per cent from the old rate are now in effect at the local Wells-Fargo office.  A reduction of nearly thirty per cent is made in first class rates under the new schdule and about thirty-two per cent in second class rates. The reduction in rates on second class mater is of decided importance to local shippers as fruits, vegetables and other food products which constitute a large percentage of local shipments received in Miami, come under that class.  Under the new schedule each pound increase iu weight means a corresponding increase in the cost of the shipment. Under the old tariff a flat rate was charged up to a certain weight. For example the same rate applied to two articles, one weighing twelve pounds and the other twenty. For a shipment weigh  ing over twenty pounds there was a decided increase in the rate, which applied to all shipments weighing over twenty pounds and less than thirty. Under the new schedule the exact weight of each shipment is determined and the tariff charged on each pound.  The reductions in rates from Miami to various pointB in the state are shown In the following table: MIAMI TO—  New Rates Old Rates First Second First Second  •Johnson relieved Rams-y in 1st •♦Baroldy batted for Boland 9th.  SI MM IKY  Homo run—Ouynup.  Two-base hits— Kamos, Guynup, Taylor, Johnson, Barton.  Struck out—By Johnson 7; by Hatch, 5.  Base on balls Off Johnson, 1; off Ramsey, 5; off Hatch, 1.  Hit by pitcher—By Johnson, 1. Passed ball-—Taylor.  Wild pitch—Hatch.  Stolen bases—Thompson, Barton, Sacrifice hits—Ward, Whitt, Watson.  GLOBE CLERKS VS.  60 WHERE BRIGHT BLUE BLAZES BURN  By the Associated Press.  EL PASO, Tex., Aug. 2.-—Foreign merchants arriving here say General Villa, at a meeting of business men at Chohuahua Saturday, ordered the confiscation of all stores and declared lie would expel all merchants to the border. The telegraph was at their disposal if they wished to protest. He said:    “if    the United  States doesn't like this action, It can go to hell. I have been fighting for twenty years and can fight as many more.” Among the plants taken over was a $5,000,000 British corporation.  MITAU, CAPITAL OF COUIILAXD, IIAS, HOWEVER. FALLEN INTO HANDS OF TEUTONS—HAVE ALSO REACHED NAKFAY.  ANSWER TO LATEST UNITED STATES NOTE TO TEUTONS MAY DEPEND I PON ANSWER OF GREAT BRITAIN.  By the Associated Press.  BERLIN, Aug. 2.—Mitau, the capital of Uourtland, Russia, has been occupied by the Germans. The Teutons have also reached Narew, overcoming an obstinate resistance. The Russians still hold Warsaw.  Globe  Miami  HCORE IIY INNINGS  ., ...6 00000010- 01090010 0-         Class    Class    Class    Class      Phoenix ,.    .$2.60    $1.95    $3.50    $2.50      Tucson ..    . 2.10    1,58    3.50    2.50      Bisbee .,.    . 2.10    1.58    4.00    3.25      Mesa ....    . 2.85    2.14    3.50    2.50      Bowie . ..    . 1.55    1.17    2.00    1.60      Yuma . ..        1.77    5.50    2.75      Prescott ,    . 3.10    2.33    4.90    3.60      Douglas ,,    . 2.10    1.58    4.00    3.25      Winkelman    3.10    2.33    4.39    3.10      Nogales .    . 1.85    1.39    4.25    3.40      Safford ..    . 1.36    .98    1.40    1.10     MINING ACTIVE ABOUT PAYSON  Paul Harrison, of Payson, who has the government contract for carrying the mail and parcel post matter between Globe and Payson. was a Miami visitor yesterday, Harrison reports that there 1b considerable ae-  A good sized crowd attended the ball game here yesterday morning between the Miami second team and the Globe Clerks, which was won by the “Seconds” by a score of 11 to 6. An admission fee of 25 cents was charged which netted t nough to pay all expenses, including the transportation of the visiting team.  BURNING HAY STACKS  By the Associated Press.  POMONA, Cal., Aug. 2.—Posses are searching for two pyromaniaos who set seven large hay slacks afire last night. The loss is estimated as high as $20,000. The fire department of Pomona and Ontario fought the flames half the night. A farmer who saw the incendiaries tired six shots as they disappeared.  ANGELEH •♦NEW MOVEMENT”  By the Assocalted Press.  NOGALES, Aug. 2. -General Angeles today dented that he had any intention of forming coalition witn General Maytorena to produce a third party in Sonora. He declined a state mission, however. He arrived yesterday and was hailed as the leader of the new movement.  STORM IN WYOMING  By the Associated Press,  CHEYENNE, Wyo., Aug. 2.—A disastrous storm occurred in eastern Wyoming Sunday. Grain, railroads, and highways suffered heavily in four counties.  IK MIAMI OIL COMPANY—  According to latest accounts the standard rig which was hauled to Roosevelt the latter part of last week from Mesa, is being placed in the field by the Miami Oil and Develop ment company, organised in Miami several months ago by Dr, Snyder and W. B. Harris.  SIX EXECUTED  By the Associated Press.  EL PASO, Tex., Aug. 2.—Six Mexican merchants at Chlhuahu i were executed Saturday, and forty-two were thrown into prison, according to foreigners. General Villa said:    “The United States can go to  hell."  MEXICAN BORDER TROUBLES  By the Associated Press.  DOUGLAS, Ar!z., Aug. 2.—General Callcs confirms the report that he sent a message to the consul at Nogales to get non-combatants out, as lie intends to bombard the place with bombs and aeroplanes. A force of Carranza men took Imuris by surprise. A troop train of Vlillstas is on the way to recapture a blown up mine.  FREIGHTER A.HIIORE  By the Associated Press.  SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., Aug. 2.— The American steamer freighter Georgian is ashore at Duxbury Reef, near the Golden Gate in a dense fog. There is a crew of over thirty aboard. Life savers and tugs are rendering assistance. The ship is intact and the sea smooth.  TWO BOATS SUNK  By the Associated Press.  LONDON. Aug. 2.—The steamer Clintonia lias    been  doed. Fifty-four of    the  aboard her have been    saved.    The  steamer Fulgens lias also been    sunk.  The crew was saved.  British  torpo-  persons  THREE-CORNERED ROW  By the Associated PreBs.  BERLIN, Aug. 2.—“Notwithstanding reports to the contrary," says the Overseas News Agency, “the German government has not decided whether the American note regarding submarine warfare is to be answered. The government awaits the text of the American note from Gr« at Britain before deciding.”  3,000 BUILDINGS BURNED  By the Associated Press.  ATHENS, Aug. 2.—-Travelers report 3,000 buildings of Constantinople, including the German hospital filled with wounded, were destroyed by fire last week.  FIRE AT 1 OF BALL GAME  G EKM A N-AM EH I CAN ALLIANCE  By teii Associated Press.  SAN FRANCISO, Cal., Aug. 2.— Hopes of a German-Austrlan victory by sea, land and air were expressed in the convention of the National German-American alliance by C. J. Hexamer, president, who yesterday assailed the United States arms for the allies and said it was a nauseated licks-spittie policy for the country.  TEUTON BARBARITIES ALLEGED  PARIS. Aug. 2.—The French investigating commission reported to the premier that it hud proved the barbarities against the Germans, citing instances of dumdum bulku, und relating a series of massacres of French wounded and prisoner.-, the n suit of orders of German General Stenger to take no prisoner . Massacres occurred after several bat-  Wliile the ball game was b lag played at Globe yesterday afternoon between the Globe and the Miami teams, the Globe fire department  wus ;ti ef<   called out by a fire which broke out]__,    ,    -_____________  on the roof of a house belonging tc WESTERN ELECTRIC RESUMES Mr. Sanders, located about two doors j CHICAGO, ill., Aug. 2—The West-from the school house on 8cho<iCern Elbctric company resumed work  Hill. The flames which, were confined to the roof and the upper portion of the Sanders residence, wero quickly extinguished.  toduy for the first time since the disaster to the Eastland. A revision of the casualties shows 830 identified, 2 unidentified and 140 missing.  RATTLESNAKE  BRALEY:  BITES 1.  J. C. Braley, in charge of the Five Points mining properties, is rapidly, recovering from the effects of a rattlesnake bite received last Friday evening. Mr. Braiey was feeding hay to his team and as he gathered up an armful of the hay the snake, which was concealed in the loose bale, nailed him in the finger. A lingature was immediately placed around the finger and Mrs. Braley rendered first aid to the injured. This prompt action undoubtedly prevented a much  more serious infection and possibly saved Mr, Braley's life. Mr. Braley states that for esveral hours after being hit the pain was excruciating.  Mrs. Braky a conuple of years ago suffered similar wounds from a rattlesnake while hunting for a bunch of keys which she had placed on a rafter over the door. In that instance they succeeded in killing the snake, but in the case of the snake which nipped Mr. Braley the reptile succeeded in making bis escape.   

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